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    So here's my situation: If I can't get an unconditional offer, I'm hoping for a conditional offer in terms of APs, since for me they are MUCH easier to score higher on. Will I be hurt, however, if I don't submit my IB scores? Conversely, if I do submit my IB scores, will my potential conditional offer default to IBs?

    Here are my stats so far:
    10 APs, all 5/5
    IB History SL, 6/7
    IB Physics SL, 7/7

    Senior year schedule:
    AP Spanish, AP English Lit, AP English Comp, AP Biology, ______ and a few more self-studied
    IB English HL, IB Chemistry HL, IB Spanish SL, IB Math HL

    What should I do?

    Thanks!
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    ... you have an insane amount of APs....
    is that even legal???
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    But in all seriousness, you must be a very good student if you are doing that many classes and have scored well in that many exams. I don't think it will hurt to send both, it will look very good for you, and since I assume you are doing full diploma it will be easier for them to give you a conditional offer with the total points.

    I definitely don't think you should not send your IB scores in, unless you are predicted very low in a certain subject or something. Just APs = okay, but over 10 APs AND the full IB diploma = godlike.
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    arent offers to US students pretty much always unconditional? they were for all the americans i know of...
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    If you only submit one of them, they'll just be wondering what you've been doing all this time. (Admittedly 10 APs can fill up most people's time, but anyway...)

    Submit both of them.
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    they can revoke your offer if they find out you've put misleading information on your ucas form- wouldn't risk it if i were you.
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    those ap's are fantastic, i think though that only about 4 fives are necessary, after that, its all about your interview and app. Basically, if you interview well, you'll get an offer even if you leave out your IB scores
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    I am not sure if it's a good idea to take all the APs you're taking PLUS the IB. I don't know about AP, but IB not only demands excelling academic standards, but also large amounts of work (courseworks, group 4 project, extended essay, etc etc). Your offer is liable to be only in AP or IB terms, and taking both will only lower your chances of getting to your offer without much tangible benefits.

    If I were you I'd drop either APs or IBs after emailing your college's tutor for your subject and asking which to drop.
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    can i ask if you're taking the full IB diploma (as in CAS, ToK and extended essay?)
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    (Original post by thomasjtl)
    can i ask if you're taking the full IB diploma (as in CAS, ToK and extended essay?)
    Yes. At my school, IB is not too much extra work over AP, so lots of kids do both.
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    (Original post by me_lht)
    Yes. At my school, IB is not too much extra work over AP, so lots of kids do both.
    Slightly irrelevant, but I got blasted on here a few months ago because I said that my brother's high school offers many classes as AP/IB using the same curriculum. Loads of IB types told me I was lying and that IB is way harder Sounds similar to yours, where some people do full IB while others pick and mix between AP and IB, depending on preference.

    It seems that Oxford likes giving conditions to US high school seniors, even when they've met the minimum entry requirements. In the end, most Americans get way harder offers than UK students, which I think is unfair. No respect for our school system :mad:
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    (Original post by me_lht)
    So here's my situation: If I can't get an unconditional offer, I'm hoping for a conditional offer in terms of APs, since for me they are MUCH easier to score higher on. Will I be hurt, however, if I don't submit my IB scores? Conversely, if I do submit my IB scores, will my potential conditional offer default to IBs?

    Here are my stats so far:
    10 APs, all 5/5
    IB History SL, 6/7
    IB Physics SL, 7/7

    Senior year schedule:
    AP Spanish, AP English Lit, AP English Comp, AP Biology, ______ and a few more self-studied
    IB English HL, IB Chemistry HL, IB Spanish SL, IB Math HL

    What should I do?

    Thanks!
    You don't mention what you are applying for... When I asked on the Open day for biochem the admissions person told me to put down my last 6 subjects since they weren't all that interested in what you did in previous years.... They appear to be more interested in what you are "predicted" to score on the courses that you're taking now. For the UK students they typically have 3 or 4 A level subjects that they will receive conditional offers on. Even though I had 6 subjects listed (year before and the current year) they only picked the ones specific to the degree that I wanted to study and made the offer conditional on grades in those subjects. For biochem it was chem, bio and physics plus total points in IB. I'm not 100% sure, but I think it confuses them if you put in too many subjects and grades. I would focus on the requirements for which ever degree that you intend to apply for, make sure that you have the pre-requisites and contact the admissions dept and tell them that you intend to report grades for courses a,b,c, etc and see what they say.
 
 
 
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