AS Chemistry Rates Practical: Arrhenious equation

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Marshall0307
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My teacher has said that as part of a practical write up for my practical on how the rate of reaction of sodium thiosulphate with hydrochloric acid changes as temperature changes. I need to use a calculation using the arrhenius equation.

I don't know what the frequency factor is or how to get it, and how to get the activation energy from my results (I have the starting temperatures in kelvin and time taken for the reaction to complete in seconds)

So the question is basically how do I get my activation energy and frequency factor so that I can find the rate constant (k) using the arrhenius equation?
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VioletPhillippo
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(Original post by Marshall0307)
My teacher has said that as part of a practical write up for my practical on how the rate of reaction of sodium thiosulphate with hydrochloric acid changes as temperature changes. I need to use a calculation using the arrhenius equation.

I don't know what the frequency factor is or how to get it, and how to get the activation energy from my results (I have the starting temperatures in kelvin and time taken for the reaction to complete in seconds)

So the question is basically how do I get my activation energy and frequency factor so that I can find the rate constant (k) using the arrhenius equation?
Hiya,

I'm not sure how helpful this is but if you plot a graph of lnK (rate constant) against 1/T (temperature) then the y intercept is the ln of the frequency and the gradient is -activation energy/gas constant (so the activation energy can be found). I don't know if this can be adjusted so that the rate constant can be found instead
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Marshall0307
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(Original post by VioletPhillippo)
Hiya,

I'm not sure how helpful this is but if you plot a graph of lnK (rate constant) against 1/T (temperature) then the y intercept is the ln of the frequency and the gradient is -activation energy/gas constant (so the activation energy can be found). I don't know if this can be adjusted so that the rate constant can be found instead
The first time I read it I was confused at first but reading more carefully this actually makes sense now, thanks a lot!
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VioletPhillippo
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(Original post by Marshall0307)
The first time I read it I was confused at first but reading more carefully this actually makes sense now, thanks a lot!
No problem, hopefully it helped you a little bit/gave you some ideas. I was doing Arrhenious the other day
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