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    as it says on the tin. I've heard from many people that medicine's difficulty lies in its workload and the emotional/people side of it, rather than the challenging-ness of the actual scientific content. In this case, do you find the degree - and ultimately the job - truly fulfilling? Yes, I can see that it will be most rewarding because you are helping people improve their quality of life, but in terms of intellectual satisfaction. Most medical students are probably very bright and have a certain 'thirst' for knowledge; do you find this met with a medicine degree as opposed to, say, a science degree where you'd go into more depth? This is perhaps an atypical impression, but from observing the day-to-day work of a doctor, it seems like a lot of the work is rather technical/practical, or how best you can communicate with people, rather than using your originality or intellect. what do you think?

    i'm sorry if I've been rude or anything in this post as that wasn't intentional; it's just something I was curious about.
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    I find it intellectually satisfying science-wise, but then I'm not all that clever. In the first two years I've found myself reading a lot of history books and things, but that's really to vary what I'm putting in my brain and because preclinical medicine ultimately becomes a bit of a party trick of how many times you can do the same thought-pattern and how much you can remember.
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    The depth of knowledge required for preclinicals is equal to that of other undergraduate degrees. The exception lies in the third year of normal science programmes, where you are required to know subjects in great depth. However, as a medic, the opportunity arises to intercalate in a basic science (or other subject) and here you get to join third year students on their degree programmes, which is quite intellectually stimulating, and perfectly within the capabilities of any medic.
    For me, the staisfaction comes with applying the theoretical knowedge to the patients in front of you.
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    So if you can get As/Bs at Advanced Higher/A-level then it shouldn't be all that tasking? The trick is in memorising heaps of stuff?
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    Yes, extremely satisfying. Preclinical science wasn't easy and there's always opportunity to 'stretch yourself' if you really want to. Not forgetting there's the option of intercalating; last year I did a science BSc so it puts you on a par with other science undergraduates.

    I've also just finished a 8 week neurocardiology research placement at Ealing Hospital; we're looking to publish in a journal early next year so if you're keen, there really aren't any boundaries.
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    I know for me, it gave me a new appreciation for practical stuff. At school its very much Vaguely Clever-Do 'academic' things and Stupid-Do 'Practical' things (Suppose using practical as a byword for fobbing people off with unskilled jobs, as opposed to its real meaning, much like vocational). At medical school, I find the practical (In the truer sense of the word) bit the most interesting: applying yourself to a job to achieve something in particular. Its no coincidence this is roughly the same time I got interested in mountaineering.

    Suppose the point I'm edging around is, I haven't found it presenting many "WTF, how does that work?" moments in the way maybe a physics or maths degree would, except in neuroscience and metabolic biochemistry. But I do find it challenging enough to fill me up and the sheer scale and surreal details of the job should (Hopefully) keep me going for a lifetime.
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    I don't see medicine as an intellectually-based career, if you follow me. Generally, people with their main attributes revolved around intellect would find working in an environment where other people's opinions hugely matter quite unsettling. I do see medicine as an intelligent subject to study, however yes, the main idea is behind the ability to communicate well and practice good medicine for the sake of healing/alleviating pain/illness. Oh, and to know your stuff also.
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    (Original post by graemematt)
    I don't see medicine as an intellectually-based career, if you follow me. Generally, people with their main attributes revolved around intellect would find working in an environment where other people's opinions hugely matter quite unsettling. I do see medicine as an intelligent subject to study, however yes, the main idea is behind the ability to communicate well and practice good medicine for the sake of healing/alleviating pain/illness. Oh, and to know your stuff also.
    Academic Medicine?
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    From what I've heard, yes and no. It's a bit vague and it depends on what you mean by academic.
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    I love it, but it I don't find it intellectually satisfying as such. It's certainly less satisfying than my first degree in those terms, but then again, medicine is a vocational course, not an academic one.
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    Academic medicine, as in research and teaching...such as those with MDs. Sorry if the description is still a bit vague, but...basically doctors with MBChB/MBBS who primarily research.
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    Ah sorry, blonde moment, right...yes I guess Academic Medicine could be intellectually stimulating, but so few graduates actually go into the world of academia per se...so do few students find the subject academically stimulating??

    No. They do, it's just that the thrill of caring/joy of the vocation takes precedence over the intellectual capacity of the education. Or so I think. I'm not even a med student :p:
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    ok, thanks for the replies, everyone. it's always helpful to get some insight from current medical students.

    Also, how easy is it to do non-medical stuff while you are a medical student? I don't mean extra-curricular activities as such, but things like keeping up a language, or doing a module in something not directly related to medicine. It's just that though I really do want to do medicine as a career, right now I have a lot of other things that I am interested in as well (such as languages, or evolutionary biology etc) and would like to do further study.
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    (Original post by nucleophile)
    ok, thanks for the replies, everyone. it's always helpful to get some insight from current medical students.

    Also, how easy is it to do non-medical stuff while you are a medical student? I don't mean extra-curricular activities as such, but things like keeping up a language, or doing a module in something not directly related to medicine. It's just that though I really do want to do medicine as a career, right now I have a lot of other things that I am interested in as well (such as languages, or evolutionary biology etc) and would like to do further study.
    Quite easy. I took Italian lessons in my third year while also doing lots of Newspaper/Student Council/Union stuff.
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    to tell you the truth, NOT at the moment, (so far anyways) but eventually i hope so.
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    I don't know because I'm still preclinical and it's probably really different from clinical medicine.

    Although it's slightly worrying that I always thought preclinical medicine would be more intellectually challenging and thus satisfying, and I don't find it very. But hey, I guess it makes work-life easier. And maybe I'll write essays for fun (ha!). Or at least do other vaguely intellectual stuff.
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    Shhheeeeeettt! 4th year kicks off tomorrow.... Je suis not ready in any way. shape or form! xxx
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Shhheeeeeettt! 4th year kicks off tomorrow.... Je suis not ready in any way. shape or form! xxx
    fourth year's so like :eek:
    good luck, you'll be fiiiine ;yes;

    rather you than me :ninja:
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    I've gotta do peads first too... I guess I know what my costume for "thing you fear most' night is gonna be
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    you'll probably love it. :p: when is the 'thing you fear most' night? I'm so not up to speed on all this
 
 
 
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