What qualifications do you need to tutor people?

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BrainJuice
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I plan to study a MPhy Undergraduate at Uni, and I'm hoping to tutor GCSE students while there over the internet or in person. Can I do this or do I need to be more qualified? I have an A* in Maths, A, A*, A* in Sciences at GCSE but the GCSEs have changed now and they seem much harder in Science specifically.
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Reality Check
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Bear in mind that it is the parents who are paying for the tuition, not the students, and the parents would ordinarily expect to see the tutor having a track record in successfully tutoring students to the required standard, plus at least an undergraduate level qualification. It's not ver y likely that you would get much business tutoring students in any subjects you only had a GCSE/A level in.
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The Tutor Pages
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(Original post by BrainJuice)
I plan to study a MPhy Undergraduate at Uni, and I'm hoping to tutor GCSE students while there over the internet or in person. Can I do this or do I need to be more qualified? I have an A* in Maths, A, A*, A* in Sciences at GCSE but the GCSEs have changed now and they seem much harder in Science specifically.
Hi Brain Juice,

There are no official qualifications necessary to become a tutor, although Reality Check is right and many parents will look for a good track record or a degree. This is not true for all, however, as some parents will go for a someone who has recently taken the exams (especially if they cannot afford a more experienced tutor who may charge higher fees).

You are right that many of the syllabi have changed recently, and you would need to get up to speed on those changes were you to tutor those subjects successfully.

Do take a look at our advice page for tutors for more info on becoming a tutor:

http://www.thetutorpages.com/private-tutor-advice

Good luck!

Emma
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dragonkeeper999
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I did a fair amount of tutoring of A level students during my first couple of years at university (undergrad) - it seemed that parents picked me initially because I was a) cheap and b) had very good grades in those subjects at A level and was then continuing to study them at a top university.

Oddly I never came across any GCSE students wanting private tuition - you might find better luck looking for A level students as this is the point at which parents are less likely to have the required knowledge to help their kids themselves, they are more willing to invest the money and there is a clear goal (university) driving them
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doodle_333
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You don't need anything specific you just can't charge as much as someone with more qualifications/experience. However if you can get off the ground with one client (perhaps offer a 'test session' at half price) then you might get referrals and you can say you have experience.
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roflcakes1
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I know a lot of undergraduates who tutor - often it's enough just to be in the process of studying for a degree even if you haven't completed it yet (although most will prefer someone at least undergrad level). If you're doing physics I'd imagine you're a good candidate to tutor physics/maths/even chemistry at GCSE. If you've never tutored before you're gonna have to offer quite a low rate, as having previous tutoring experience is really attractive for parents and students. But once you get your first client you can expand pretty easily.

It may be a problem that the syllabus has changed, so you'll need to put in extra work at the start to get to grips with the different syllabus, including work to familiarize yourself with it as well as preparing lesson/tutoring plans so this might be a big factor which will reduce your earnings per hour worked (since you will do hours of work outside tutorials) but again once you've got this out of the way you can then expand without much extra work. Good luck!
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Vicki-Marie
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Be careful if you will be tutoring in a stranger's house - have a thorough phone conversation about the student's progress beforehand to check the family is genuine. Do you have a current DBS certificate? If not, ensure a parent is in the room if you tutor someone under 16. You can create a free profile on the First Tutors website or pay to advertise on The Tutor Pages (highly recommended - I get most of my Sociology and Psychology student referrals from The Tutor Pages). Good luck.
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