Kofi18
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I am doing some coursework and need some help answering a coursework question in which we have to compare two books. For me it is The Picture of Dorian Gray My question is 'Although Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker seem to offer the reassurance of a return to moral certainty The Picture of Dorian Gray and Dracula are ultimately transgressive in their exploration of sin and sexual desire How are the settings/homes in both books linked to sin and sexual desire? (aristocracy) (Dracula, emergent middle class industry viewed as hardworking and productive and also general help in answering the question + critical theory getting an A/A* is imperative and any help would be greatly appreciated Is the figure of Lucy Westanara important in conveying these themes
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TSR Jessica
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Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you've posted in the right place? Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there.


Just quoting in Fox Corner so she can move the thread if needed :wizard:
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(Original post by Kofi18)
I am doing some coursework and need some help answering a coursework question in which we have to compare two books. For me it is The Picture of Dorian Gray My question is 'Although Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker seem to offer the reassurance of a return to moral certainty The Picture of Dorian Gray and Dracula are ultimately transgressive in their exploration of sin and sexual desire How are the settings/homes in both books linked to sin and sexual desire? (aristocracy) (Dracula, emergent middle class industry viewed as hardworking and productive and also general help in answering the question + critical theory getting an A/A* is imperative and any help would be greatly appreciated Is the figure of Lucy Westanara important in conveying these themes
I loooooove these two novels and I chose Dorian as my coursework in A-level and studied Dracula last year in uni which was fun! I've also just completed a literature module in Crime and Transgression!

But your question is SOOO long! I mean you have way too much going on there for starters. I think you should try and cut it down a bit so it shows more fluidity.

I'm not one for Eco-theory as in theory about surrounding in literature and so forth. And I don't think there's many settings in Dracula where you could link it with sin and sexual desire. Apart from the bedroom in the castles or just bedrooms in general. When you refer to sin; make sure you are careful with this. Sin is a word that stems from biblical studies and if you're not looking at the novels in a religious sense, I would get rid of the word sin and keep the word transgression instead.

Of course, I'm not going to do your research for you either. That's your job! But critical theory - if you're looking into sexual desires then Freud and Psychoanalysis will be your best fried. For example, I wrote about psychoanalysis when I used Dracula for my exam. And I remember referring to psychoanalysis how Lucy represents motherhood and how Dracula and the kids want to suck her blood because it represents babies sucking their mother's breast for food and companionship. Psychoanalysis is a weird one and a very complicated one so be prepared to read some ludicrous things!

I can't speak much for Dorian as it's been a while since I've read it. But you could allude sin and sexual desire to the garden that has the flowers and you could even allude to the drama theatre and its disillusionment of reality and that could be linked with sexual desire in terms of same-sex; it the Victorian society that was classed as a mental health disorder and illegal so the sexual desire Wilde alludes to could be him breaking from reality in order to get to those sexual desires.

But I think sexual desires isn't really that obvious in Dorian. Dorian Gray explores themes of corruption of the innocent, loss of morality, hedonism and the fall of society. It doesn't explore sexual desire as you could apply that in Dracula. So maybe stick with just the theme of transgression instead?

Good luck though - they are amazing texts!
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