Katski
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I really love physics, maths and computer science and I really would love to have my degree in physics with maths. I would however like an actual long term job as a software engineer or programmer. Is this possible / liable with a physics degree? If so what specialised physics degree would be best suited e.g. computational physics/ quantum mechanics etc.
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Kravence
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(Original post by Katski)
I really love physics, maths and computer science and I really would love to have my degree in physics with maths. I would however like an actual long term job as a software engineer or programmer. Is this possible / liable with a physics degree? If so what specialised physics degree would be best suited e.g. computational physics/ quantum mechanics etc.
Why don't you just go for a computer science degree instead? since that's what most tech companies ask for when you apply
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Mistletoe
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IMO Computer Science / Software Engineering is hugely more valuable than any other degree in the modern era (and they usually try to cram Maths/Physics with as much programming as they can via Matlab or Mathematica, but it is not enough to write good and useful programs)
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BigYoSpeck
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A programming role is entirely possible without any degree for the right kind of person. There are a lot of success stories of self-taught or boot camp students landing roles. With the strong maths background you will gain in physics with maths it should be entirely possible for you to also learn coding skills and provided you have a good portfolio of work there's no reason you couldn't land work as a programmer if you have the skills and a body of work to back it up.
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Mistletoe
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(Original post by BigYoSpeck)
A programming role is entirely possible without any degree for the right kind of person. There are a lot of success stories of self-taught or boot camp students landing roles. With the strong maths background you will gain in physics with maths it should be entirely possible for you to also learn coding skills and provided you have a good portfolio of work there's no reason you couldn't land work as a programmer if you have the skills and a body of work to back it up.
I find it highly unlikely that a Maths/Physics student will have the required knowledge of databases, graphics, programming paradigms and everything else to write anything of use outside of the domain of Maths/Physics. I would even go so far as to say that a CompSci grad from a polytechnic is more employable in Software than an Oxbridge/Imperial grad of Maths/Physics. Databases account for about 90% of corporate programming and there is very little of databases taught in Physics (and I assume in Maths too).

Furthermore self-taught programmers are not of the right calibre to land jobs in Software Engineering, that's why GameDev companies never post their job applications anywhere but seek agencies to recruit at Universities instead.
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Princepieman
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(Original post by Katski)
I really love physics, maths and computer science and I really would love to have my degree in physics with maths. I would however like an actual long term job as a software engineer or programmer. Is this possible / liable with a physics degree? If so what specialised physics degree would be best suited e.g. computational physics/ quantum mechanics etc.
Yes.

Study algorithms and data structures, basic CS concepts and pick up a few languages by making projects.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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BigYoSpeck
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(Original post by Mistletoe)
I find it highly unlikely that a Maths/Physics student will have the required knowledge of databases, graphics, programming paradigms and everything else to write anything of use outside of the domain of Maths/Physics. I would even go so far as to say that a CompSci grad from a polytechnic is more employable in Software than an Oxbridge/Imperial grad of Maths/Physics. Databases account for about 90% of corporate programming and there is very little of databases taught in Physics (and I assume in Maths too).

Furthermore self-taught programmers are not of the right calibre to land jobs in Software Engineering, that's why GameDev companies never post their job applications anywhere but seek agencies to recruit at Universities instead.
You should look up Travis Neilson, he has a Youtube channel called DevTips.

Self taught and works at google.

Or Quincy Larson is the creator of FreeCodeCamp, again self-taught.

The original poster loves physics and maths, university will give him a better education on that topic than self-learning ever will.

He wants to be a coder, and while a computer science degree is a great way to achieve that (it's my plan) it can be achieved still without that degree. And I would suggest someone capable of studying physics and maths at a degree level is exactly the kind of person with the aptitude to succeed as a self-taught or bootcamp trained coder.

I am not advocating he should pursue that route, I'm certainly not doing I'm going to study computer science because I know that is what will work for me. He wanted to know if it is possible, and it absolutely is.
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Mistletoe
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(Original post by BigYoSpeck)
You should look up Travis Neilson, he has a Youtube channel called DevTips.

Self taught and works at google.

Or Quincy Larson is the creator of FreeCodeCamp, again self-taught.

The original poster loves physics and maths, university will give him a better education on that topic than self-learning ever will.

He wants to be a coder, and while a computer science degree is a great way to achieve that (it's my plan) it can be achieved still without that degree. And I would suggest someone capable of studying physics and maths at a degree level is exactly the kind of person with the aptitude to succeed as a self-taught or bootcamp trained coder.

I am not advocating he should pursue that route, I'm certainly not doing I'm going to study computer science because I know that is what will work for me. He wanted to know if it is possible, and it absolutely is.
I would suggest that it's only applicable if the field in which he eventually works involves a lot of maths/physics for example developing Physics Engines for games. Other than that I can't think of how Maths and Physics can help you in programming. Can you suggest some areas where it can? I am all for being proved wrong.
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HANNAHBENLOLO
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Yes you can enter one of the software engineering graduate schemes
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BigYoSpeck
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(Original post by Mistletoe)
I would suggest that it's only applicable if the field in which he eventually works involves a lot of maths/physics for example developing Physics Engines for games. Other than that I can't think of how Maths and Physics can help you in programming. Can you suggest some areas where it can? I am all for being proved wrong.
There is a reason why Maths is a highly desired A level for computer science degrees.

The science of computation is fundamentally mathematics, just base-2 mathematics.

Being given a problem and told to create an algorithm to solve it, or being given a maths or physics problem and finding an equation to solve it are critical thinking exercises.

Plus you completely disregarded two self-taught programmers I gave you as an example of success stories.
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Mistletoe
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(Original post by BigYoSpeck)
Plus you completely disregarded two self-taught programmers I gave you as an example of success stories.
That's because there are thousands of self-taught programmers who never get the jobs they apply for because they are underqualified. A few exceptions doesn't prove much.


There is a reason why Maths is a highly desired A level for computer science degrees.

The science of computation is fundamentally mathematics, just base-2 mathematics.

Being given a problem and told to create an algorithm to solve it, or being given a maths or physics problem and finding an equation to solve it are critical thinking exercises.
Computer science is base-2 mathematics? No, binary is base-two mathematics. The arity of one numerical system does not define an entire discipline. You do CompSci no justice by suggesting it's encapsulated withing Mathematics. It's a lot more than that, as you're soon to find out.
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BigYoSpeck
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(Original post by Mistletoe)
That's because there are thousands of self-taught programmers who never get the jobs they apply for because they are underqualified. A few exceptions doesn't prove much.
There are thousands of computer science graduates who don't get jobs they apply for. It ultimately comes down to your other skills and qualities not just if they excel in an academic environment.

If someone asks me what the best route to being a programmer or developer is, I'm going to say do a computer science degree. Something I'm confident you agree with me on.

If someone asks me is doing a computer science degree a guarantee I'll get the job I want? I'm going to say no, the streets aren't quite as paved with gold as some might think. You need something that sets you apart from the crowd.

The original posters question is can he be a developer if he studies physics with maths? The answer is yes. I'm not saying it's the best way, it might be for him or it might not. But if he's set on it and his only concern is if it's possible. Then you can't say it's not, because there are real examples of people who have succeeded without a computer science degree.

But a computer science degree is still the best route.
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Java7
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It's entirely possible with any degree, since there are many self taught programmers. I'm one and most junior programmer jobs don't require a degree. I know an engineering grad who developed his own projects and another guy who dropped out and did the same thing to get a job.

So yes it is very possible.

Write your own projects in Java, C#, Python.

These could be software such as a POS system, shopping cart catalog, video games, mobile apps. YouTube provide great examples on how to achieve this.
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ETbuymilkandeggs
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(Original post by Princepieman)
Yes.

Study algorithms and data structures, basic CS concepts and pick up a few languages by making projects.

Posted from TSR Mobile
^

make up for the lack of taught practical programming by your building your own extracurricular portfolio
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