Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi having been to the first part of my induction at college my tutor is "strongly recommending" me to do AS Critical thinking, on top of maths, further maths, physics and chemistry. Knowing that unis don't really care about it, I said no, to which she replied "you either do that or another AS level". Now, bearing in mind I already have the subjects I need to do maths or engineering at uni I looked around and narrowed the subjects down to philosophy as an alternative to Critical Thinking. I found the brief overview of the subject quite interesting yet I don't know how difficult it will be to do it as a fifth AS. My questions:
    1. What is the workload of an AS level in philosophy (AQA) compared to that of Critical Thinking, and other A level subjects?
    2. Do you need to be naturally talented in essay writing to do philosophy? I got 9A*s, and 1A at GCSE, but prefer working logically (with numbers).
    3. Is Philosophy similar to critical thinking in terms of what you study?
    4. For those who have done philosophy/Critical thinking, did you enjoy it or do you regret picking it?
    Sorry for the long post but any last minute advice would be really appreciated (I have to confirm my choice tomorow)
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    1. I imagine similar. Maybe higher in philosophy. This really isn't an issue though, thousands take this qualification every year, it's perfectly accessible.
    2. Which are you talking about?
    3. No.
    4. I don't know many people who did philosophy, but all regretted it. Everyone in my school who picked critical thinking regretted it.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I did Critical Thinking and didn't regret it. It required no extra work on my part (other than sitting the exams), and gave me an extra A-Level.
    Personal opinion though. If you think Philosophy will benefit you more, go for that. I only picked CT as it was a completely extra A-Level for me.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Sorry I meant philosophy in the second question.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Philosophy is a much more respected subject, but some questions are just so subjective...

    I wonder if the examiner actually cares?

    e.g.

    Is equality a moral idea?

    Can a deprived upbringing exempt a wrongdoer from sin?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I can't really answer your questions but i'd go for philosophy.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    1. What is the workload of an AS level in philosophy (AQA) compared to that of Critical Thinking, and other A level subjects?

    I would think that philosophy has a greater work load, especially the bits relating to religion where you need to remember bible extracts... "for instance in Genesis 1:3"

    2. Do you need to be naturally talented in essay writing to do philosophy? I got 9A*s, and 1A at GCSE, but prefer working logically (with numbers).

    Can you think independantly and make your own decisions with questions where there is no right or wrong answer? Bit like History I guess:/

    3. Is Philosophy similar to critical thinking in terms of what you study?

    I think philosophy would be the harder option and be more depth thinking, especially over moral issues like animal testing.

    4. For those who have done philosophy/Critical thinking, did you enjoy it or do you regret picking it?

    I have no idea..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Speaking from experience here: Did Maths, Physics, Computing, Philosophy.

    1- AQA Philosophy definitely has a greater work load compared to CT. But you don't have any coursework for AS. Just 3 papers in 3 hours. 1 hour each. The topics covered are really interesting anyway.

    2- I wouldn't think so, provided your Tutor puts you through a lot of past papers your style will improve a lot (happened to me) and Philosophy essays aren't quite like English ones where you may need to use fancy words. Philosophy requires you to explain theories etc as simply as you can, as if you were teaching someone that has never studied Philosophy, but it requires a lot of technical language).

    3- Er...Yes. Critical Thinking is basically reading through text and being able to analyse the text in detail, it simply improves your ability to analyse documents "critically". Philosophy REQUIRES that skill, since you're going to be reading up a lot of theories you'll need to be able to find criticisms on your own.

    4- I really enjoyed Philosophy, simply because topics covered were interesting. Though the students in the Philosophy class are totally different to the ones I have in my number crunching classes. And looking at your subjects it would be a great addition to add some variety.
    My only regret was that I didn't revise one of the Papers well enough which brought my overall grade down to a B instead of an A

    It's totally different from your other subjects but hey- if it's between CT and Philosophy, go for Philosophy.
    Be warned though, it's a really hard subject- I reckon it's the Arts equivalent of Maths. Hope this helped
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Why is your tutor saying you've got to do 5 AS-levels? You've got four already and if you don't CT you've got to do another one? Seems a bit strange that they're insisting on 5

    Edit: Having done Philosophy A-level and Critical Thinking AS...philosophy wins hands down
    Offline

    13
    I haven't read all of these posts but if you're going to pick a subject I'd go for Philosophy. I don't know anyone who hated this subject. It really depends what the exam syllabus is like (I was with OCR). I went to a couple of Critical Thinking taster sessions and I found it rather pointless. I could be wrong though. In terms of workload I'd say Philosophy is harder and will take up more of your study time/thinking space! This is just my personal opinion . The people I know that did C.T and Philo found the latter harder but altogether more enjoyable.

    All the best xx
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'd say go for philosophy, it is well respected and would be looked upon with favour by university maths departments. Quite simply you need to be good at essay writing to do well, but with your GCSEs you should be fine. Remember that maths and philosophy (of the analytic variety) are closely linked and both require locical thinking. After a year of philsophy I have only praise for this most interesting of subjects, those who say otherwise should I suspect stick with a less demanding arts subject, english perhaps.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Philosophy is a great subject, and the work load isn't immense - but I'm only doing four subjects so it might not be the same for someone taking five. The essay writing element of the course is the most important, so if - like me - you enjoy constructing arguments and writing really 'flowery' in-depth essays then Philosophy is perfect. But I would say don't do it unless you really want to - which is the same as with any other subject I suppose.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for your advice guys - I suppose there's no harm in taking it (if it can fit into my timetable!) and then seeing how it goes.
 
 
 

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.