username2199397
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Do you need to know the functons of the inorganic ions in the body?

This is what the spec says:

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Both the endorsed textbook + CGP has a whole page full of the functions.
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Reality Check
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Yes, of course you need to know the functions of these ions! They're crucial in the functioning of the nervous system (Na, K, Cl and Ca particularly), buffering the blood, acid-base balance, respiration, constituents of membranes and biological macromolecules...the list goes on!
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Yes, of course you need to know the functions of these ions! They're crucial in the functioning of the nervous system (Na, K, Cl and Ca particularly), buffering the blood, acid-base balance, respiration, constituents of membranes and biological macromolecules...the list goes on!
Will you learn about them later on in the following modules?
Do you need to know all their roles? *e.g. some have multiple roles or just 1 of them
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(Original post by shohaib712)
Will you learn about them later on in the following modules?
Do you need to know all their roles? *e.g. some have multiple roles or just 1 of them

You'll come across the throughout the entire course - it's not something that occurs discreetly in one module and you 'learn about it' - these ions are fundamental to the entire course.

Not being harsh, but you do need to have a much broader overview of biology as an integrated whole in which key concepts underlie the entire topic rather than this 'tick list from a specification and module' approach which will not lead to very high grades. You will need to know all of their roles as they are so broad, not just one or two examples.
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You'll come across the throughout the entire course - it's not something that occurs discreetly in one module and you 'learn about it' - these ions are fundamental to the entire course.

Not being harsh, but you do need to have a much broader overview of biology as an integrated whole in which key concepts underlie the entire topic rather than this 'tick list from a specification and module' approach which will not lead to very high grades. You will need to know all of their roles as they are so broad, not just one or two examples.
Okay i'll learn it. Which module will you start to learn about their roles in detail? Becuase i can't really memorise things without having to go over it in detail/ understanding how it link to something else (if that make any sense at all).

Is it a good idea to make questions out of my notes and do them - to remember it?

Are you doing AS/A-level?
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(Original post by shohaib712)
Which module will you start to learn about their roles in detail?
There's usually a module on basic biochemistry such as lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, ATP and so forth. ATP, as it's name suggests, contains three phosphate groups which are crucial to understanding why ATP is the 'universal energy currency'. Lipids contain a carboxylic acid functional group, which has an OH, and carbohydrates are formed from sugar momomers which again contain OH groups. As you can see from this brief summary, inorganic elements and ions come up pretty quickly and are fundamental!

(Original post by shohaib712)
Is it a good idea to make questions out of my notes and do them - to remember it?
Yes, making question sheets so you can check your learning and what you remember is a great way to learn the topic.

(Original post by shohaib712)
Are you doing AS/A-level?
No, I've done a degree in Biological Natural Sciences and then higher level study. I did A level Biology and Chemistry before this.
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(Original post by Reality Check)
There's usually a module on basic biochemistry such as lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, ATP and so forth. ATP, as it's name suggests, contains three phosphate groups which are crucial to understanding why ATP is the 'universal energy currency'. Lipids contain a carboxylic acid functional group, which has an OH, and carbohydrates are formed from sugar momomers which again contain OH groups. As you can see from this brief summary, inorganic elements and ions come up pretty quickly and are fundamental!



Yes, making question sheets so you can check your learning and what you remember is a great way to learn the topic.


No, I've done a degree in Biological Natural Sciences and then higher level study. I did A level Biology and Chemistry before this.
Oh I get it now! That's an easier way of learning it by linking to the biomolecules. The textbook doesn't explicitly mention the link between the phosphate in ATP and the function of inorganic ions but learning them this way makes it easier to understand there functions!


I'm also making the past paper questions into flash cards, so I can do them whenever I want + memorise the markschemes as similar questions tend to repeat (mostly for chemistry though)


Oh I see. How did you find Alevels?
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(Original post by shohaib712)
Oh I get it now! That's an easier way of learning it by linking to the biomolecules. The textbook doesn't explicitly mention the link between the phosphate in ATP and the function of inorganic ions but learning them this way makes it easier to understand there functions!


I'm also making the past paper questions into flash cards, so I can do them whenever I want + memorise the markschemes as similar questions tend to repeat (mostly for chemistry though)


Oh I see. How did you find Alevels?
I would be a little careful about memorising answers - particularly with the new specifications. You need to understand the science behind it so you can use that knowledge to answer unfamiliar situations and questions if you want to access the highest marks. Indeed, this is the most important factor in getting the top grades. Memorisation will only get you so far.

I enjoyed my A levels, but I worked hard at them.
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I would be a little careful about memorising answers - particularly with the new specifications. You need to understand the science behind it so you can use that knowledge to answer unfamiliar situations and questions if you want to access the highest marks. Indeed, this is the most important factor in getting the top grades. Memorisation will only get you so far.

I enjoyed my A levels, but I worked hard at them.
Alright. I'll do the questions first and then write them up into cue cards. I think memorising the answers is better than memorising some of the textbook content. (e.g the textbook ramles on about the roles of the cytoskeleton but the exam questions require specific answers)

I'm also making notes of application stuff (its given on the textbook) e.g. how microtubles work by polymerising/hydrolysis reactions to move the organelles/cells. + questions are given with it.

And for topics such as biomolecules I will make posters of the structures.
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