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University lowers entry grades for disadvantaged watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you think universities should lower entry grades for disadvantaged students?
    Yes, give them a chance!
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    NO! It's not fair
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    So the University of Bristol is going to be accepting lower exam grades from disadvantaged local pupils and applicants from schools with poor A-level results.

    The project is being launched as admissions figures show young people from poorer families are much less likely to apply to university, and therefore seem to be missing out.

    You can read the full story here on the BBC website.

    What do you think about this decision?

    On one hand it'll be good to give less likely applicants a chance, but will other students complain it's unfair?

    Do you think other universities should extend the same principles?

    DISCUSSSS :hmmmm2::hmmmm2::hmmmm2:
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    I think it's a start but I don't think requirements are discouraging poorer people
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    tis very worrying

    how much more low will it get
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    Completely unfair to other students. Getting poorer grades means they are less prepared for the university course so will either fail or the course will have to be dumbed down.

    Doing well at A Levels doesn't require money, it requires dedication. If you want to succeed you will, regardless of how much money you have. If you can't get the grades for the university course you want to do you're either not smart enough or aren't dedicated enough, either way you're not fit for the course.

    I went to school in one of the worst regions in the country for results, and in one of the poorest areas in the country. I did well in A levels because I tried.
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    Low income is associated with poorer quality of home life, less stability within families (e.g crowded living space, parents on low income in the first place because of health issues or poor education themselves, which directly impacts the child). Children from low income backgrounds can be discouraged from applying to university because of commitments at home, lack of time/space to study, family life being more of a priority, or their low income can lead to poor behaviour e.g stealing or shoplifting or jumping train barriers etc.

    As a student from a low income background I can severely relate to this. It pains me knowing how many teachers told me about the potential I have but watching myself go downhill during A Levels due to home life (caring for a parent, not having the means to socialise much etc). I pleaded with my Firm university on results day but I just ended up in Clearing. I guess I'm happy where I am now, because I think even though I had a lot of potential, my home life would always be a barrier and make me focus less on university. So if I was admitted into an RG as originally planned, I probably wouldn't be able to keep up.

    Kids from low income backgrounds all have a different story though, and for some it would be a real dream to get into a top uni with slightly lower entry requirements, that would definitely encourage them to prioritise their education a bit more, so I think it's a good idea.

    For those of you who think it's unfair, just consider that if you come from a high income family it's very likely you had a much more stable upbringing, better mental health, better social life and overall better access to everything from textbooks and summer schools that you have to pay for. I couldn't even afford to resit all of the AS exams I had wanted to, which had a direct impact on my final grade, and I struggled immensely at the start of college trying to save money for textbooks that other people had from day 1.
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    Low income families can benefit from a reduction in grade requirements. Speaking from experience, I know I cannot dedicate all my time to my A Level work as I need to work to support myself and family, as well as help around the house. I have to care for my brother as well. The time adds up and leaves little time for me to study.

    It encourages people to go to university to improve their financial situation through the family too.

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    (Original post by Petulia)
    low income can lead to poor behaviour e.g stealing or shoplifting or jumping train barriers etc.
    Small point to pick up on, but regardless:
    Tbf if getting the train didn't cost so ****ing much in the first place I think people would be less inclined to jump barriers.

    The average wage has increased, at its' peak, by 2.5% this year (though it's measured month by month according to this), whereas train fares are set to increase, depending on the source, between 1.9% and 2.3% as of January.

    However, the "average wage" (according to the same source) is apparently £507 a week... maybe 2-3 people I know personally are on that kind of money (and one of them works abroad), so I think it's fair to say that not everyone has benefited from the alleged 2.5% wage increase (I know I sure haven't).

    In fact, I'd be willing to bet that many peoples' wages haven't changed a bit in the past few years, but the price of a train ticket never ceases to increase year upon year.
    If the rise in rail fares matched the rate at which wages go up (for everyone across the board, not just the select few who are lucky enough to get a bigger wage packet year by year. And that's matched at the very least; ideally wages would increase more than the price of a train ticket does) then I'd struggle to condone hopping the train a lot more than I actually do.
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    my one working parent was (he's retired now) a postman, so I was pretty poor. but I got A*AA (and an extra full a level - a C)
    why should I have had to work so hard if others didn't?
    this is anti-competitive, anti-equality, anti-fairness, anti-sanity.
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    This irritates me as an international student paying overwhelming tution fees.
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    Lol atleast it is happening to Bristol and not the top unis.
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    Yeah that works or they could elevate grades for privately educated people


    Anyone who thinks an A*AA from someone privately educated or even in a well off catchment area is better than someone with AAB from someone who lives on a south London estate or in a council flat in Yorkshire with crappy schools as their catchment is deluded.
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    Coming from a poor background, I welcome this news. I wish this was in effect when i applied to uni when i was younger.
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    It's not really fair, is it.
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    Window dressing for a problem far more deep rooted in our education system. I think it's offensive to both those who've worked their arses off to get the right grades to go on to the top universities AND I think it's insulting to these 'poor' children who've done badly - it is patronising and tokenistic.

    We need to deal with the problem of raising aspiration in these 'poor kids', rather than throwing a few 'discounted' places at them and expect them to be grateful for them.
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    And on the same day https://www.timeshighereducation.com...analysis-finds comes out
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    (Original post by discobish)
    So the University of Bristol is going to be accepting lower exam grades from disadvantaged local pupils and applicants from schools with poor A-level results.

    The project is being launched as admissions figures show young people from poorer families are much less likely to apply to university, and therefore seem to be missing out.

    You can read the full story here on the BBC website.

    What do you think about this decision?

    On one hand it'll be good to give less likely applicants a chance, but will other students complain it's unfair?

    Do you think other universities should extend the same principles?

    DISCUSSSS :hmmmm2::hmmmm2::hmmmm2:
    The problem that most poor people aspiring to go to University have is that they're poor, not dumb. I think more scholarships should be made available for impoverished applicants, rather than lowering the bar for them. In my opinion it's actually kinda degrading.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Completely unfair to other students. Getting poorer grades means they are less prepared for the university course so will either fail or the course will have to be dumbed down.

    Doing well at A Levels doesn't require money, it requires dedication. If you want to succeed you will, regardless of how much money you have. If you can't get the grades for the university course you want to do you're either not smart enough or aren't dedicated enough, either way you're not fit for the course.

    I went to school in one of the worst regions in the country for results, and in one of the poorest areas in the country. I did well in A levels because I tried.
    You're an exception, not a rule. Well done for you that is great but I feel like you just want to feel superior to you school mates...

    Private school:
    - Good teachers that are well paid
    - Parents paying a lot for education so clearly value educating their children and therefore a lot of encouragement/pressure/support
    - Small class sizes
    - You get what you pay for, there are strict rules
    - Often compulsory homework sessions after school

    Poorly performing state school with poor catchment area:
    - Few teachers want to work there, therefore they end up with the worst ones
    - Parents probably don't come from an academic background therefore not really a lot of importance place in education (of course this can do the opposite and make them really push their kid, but from my experience this isn't the case most of the time)
    - Very disruptive classmates that make learning difficult
    - Peer pressure that being good at school is "uncool", pressure to join gangs in certain areas
    - Parents are not paying for school so kids can easily skip class
    - Unstable home life


    Of course these are generalisations and there are exceptions and more contributing factors but anyone who compares the 2 environments can easily see why people at private school are more likely to get higher grades. It doesn't mean that the same amount of effort isn't being put in and it doesn't mean people in the poor state school are dumber and therefore are less prepared for university. Let's be honest, most 1st year modules are at the same level as A-level or only slightly more advanced. All of my friends who went to private school for their whole life but chose to go to a state 6th form/college (I know quite a few people who did this!) say they wish they stayed at the private school because it was easier and they would have done better.
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    (Original post by alow)
    Completely unfair to other students. Getting poorer grades means they are less prepared for the university course so will either fail or the course will have to be dumbed down.

    Doing well at A Levels doesn't require money, it requires dedication. If you want to succeed you will, regardless of how much money you have. If you can't get the grades for the university course you want to do you're either not smart enough or aren't dedicated enough, either way you're not fit for the course.

    I went to school in one of the worst regions in the country for results, and in one of the poorest areas in the country. I did well in A levels because I tried.
    I must say you seem disillusioned with not being able to see how coming from a poor background can hinder a person. It not always because they aren't smart enough or dedicated enough. I was predicted AAB but only acheived CCC cos i had to look after my disabled mother 2-3 days a week so couldnt always attend 6th form. Trying to do this, work part time and then trying to find the time to do coursework is nigh on impossible. I was dedicated, just i had other priorities also.
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    There's nothing worse than poor born students who do well and then completely turn their back on their background, and just simply spout 'well I did it so why can't everyone else'.

    Statistically the lower your socio-economic background, and the lower your family income, the less likely you are to go to a top university. Just compare top private school grades to the standard state school grades and you'll see they are miles apart.

    I achieved AAA at A-level attending a failing comprehensive. However, I got the highest grades in my year. This got me into York, which I love, but I know for certain had I attended a good school I would have went to Oxbridge as my school didn't help me reach my potential at all. No one ever from my Sixth Form has went to Oxbridge.

    I think AAB from attending a **** school is undoubtably more impressive than A*AA from Eton and it's great that Bristol understand that.


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    (Original post by alow)
    Completely unfair to other students. Getting poorer grades means they are less prepared for the university course so will either fail or the course will have to be dumbed down.

    Doing well at A Levels doesn't require money, it requires dedication. If you want to succeed you will, regardless of how much money you have. If you can't get the grades for the university course you want to do you're either not smart enough or aren't dedicated enough, either way you're not fit for the course.

    I went to school in one of the worst regions in the country for results, and in one of the poorest areas in the country. I did well in A levels because I tried.

    Honestly I don't think that's true - there's a strong correlation between how poor people are and their life at home/with their family. If their family is poor, it is likely/possible their parents are not helping them enough with their education, and they do not get the same chance as other students e.g. getting tuition which people do so commonly nowadays. But even without that, look at how it would be for someone coming from a poor family, they may not be able to realise their potential just because they are being forced to prioritise other things higher than their education e.g. helping out family, doing a job, etc. Although I get your point about not being able to keep up at uni, I think they shouldn't automatically just lower grades for anyone coming from a bad school or area, it should be on an individual basis e.g. their may be a student coming from a bad school but they don't know if this is because of the opportunities they have lacked or their own fault like not being dedicated enough - it's obviously complex but I think it will benefit even more if they don't make it as simple as reducing grade requirements for everyone.
 
 
 
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