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    hi, i was wondering what people ave done to achieve such high results.

    Advice plzzzzzzzzzzzz!

    Thank you
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    With an awful lot of luck :P Nah...But it's true you do need luck to be honest, in some papers. There were some I was confident about, and some not so. Also, it helps an awful lot to stay relaxed in the exam. It helps if you're confident as well If you go in thinking you'll fail, you've failed already.

    Revision is different for everyone, so do what you think is best for yourself. Some people only need a few hours, others need months. But I will say don't start too early - You'll get bored, and end up doing less revision altogether.
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    I tend to find that GCSEs are really quite easy, and most people can get all A*s if they put effort in. I didn't put any effort in tbh... prolly should have.
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    Yeah right, I go to a grammar school and most of my friends tried hard in their GCSE's getting good grades, i.e myself 3A*'s, 6A's, 1B. Started my revision in March and couldn't have done any better, same goes for my mates but thing is that they aren't easy, you have to work to get a good grade, you can't not put in any effort and come out with an A*, it doesn't work like that I've seen it happen to reasonably clever people who don't try - don't get good grades.
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    Learn exam technique.
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    Print off the specification and revise from that. And do a heck of a lot of practice papers - there's no use knowing stuff if you can't apply it
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    Get the nerves out of the way before you sit any exams! I managed to use them all up ages ago, way before the exams and as a results I felt absolutely calm all through them. To be honest I was pretty worried!

    To back the "be calm and you'll do better theory" out of five of us the three who did best (two of my friends got all A*s I got 2 As and 8 A*s) were'nt half as paniccy, or trying to cram in as much revision as the other two.

    Also beconfident, and ignore predictions. They're a load of rubbish and just pressurise or demoralise you.
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    dont waste your time with A*'s i dont understand why your all hypin'....once you get to a-levels they mean nothing, when you get to uni your a-levels mean nothing...just try your hardest at university and actually enjoy your childhood!
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    I got one A, so I guess this disqualifies me from posting but whatever. It's a bit of a silly question anyway, just try your best and work hard the usual right. Just make sure you learn for the exam and know how the mark scheme operates, it's a game, tick all the exmainers boxes and you've done it.
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    it's not that hard to get A*s...except in english and eng lit. for sciences, all you need to do is learn the specification by heart and do all the past papers. for languages, learn all tenses, advanced vocab and stuff...for geo and history which you have more essay based questions u learn key bullet points and expand them in the exam into essay form. for english literature, learn ur text back to front so u can pinpoint any event or quotation during the exam without wasting time. for eng lang. u just need to develop the technique - improve grammar, punctuation etc. and do loads of practice papers.
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    ------------------------
    Well, I think everyone has the ability (more or less) to get all A*s.

    But I found, that during exams season, you shouldn't spend too much time on the Internet (especially this site)...

    ** my school blocked Internet access (95% of the time), and I was a full time boarder...

    Here's what I did..
    ------------------------

    1) Do your coursework well.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    2) Read the specifications, and study! Seriously... if you go to Asia and stuff, they study sooooooo much more harder... *** The secret is to study study study...

    Q: How do I study?
    A: Studying is just like grinding in WoW.. Attrition, attrition, and attrition

    e.g. for... Religious Studies.

    2 weeks before the exam, just go over everything your teacher has given you, and/or CGP book
    *MAKE SURE YOU MEMORISE IT!!! ----> e.g. if it says, Jesus was born in 30BC... then close 30BC and keep saying to yourself 30BC 30BC 30BC

    open your hand, and if its right, then whoopdeedoo, on to the next fact..

    If it's not, then go try the next 10 facts, and then go back to the "Jesus was born in 30BC"

    **Then...
    On the weekend before the week of the exam, go over the "Jesus was born in 30BC" fact
    On the eve of the exam, go over the "Jesus was born in 30BC" fact

    Obviously, there are more facts that you need than this,
    However, the truth is..
    You only have a limited amount of time, so make sure you prioritize exams which are more important, or in such a way that you can capitalize on getting the best grades on



    *****Exams are about facts.. If you got them, then you pwn the xams. like me
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    (Original post by Tinchy Stryder)
    dont waste your time with A*'s i dont understand why your all hypin'....once you get to a-levels they mean nothing, when you get to uni your a-levels mean nothing...just try your hardest at university and actually enjoy your childhood!
    Give it a rest. If you want to go to a great university and not just "a university" then yes they do matter to an extent. You say after you get to uni A Levels mean nothing. Well to get in they certainly mean something and also the fact many graduate programs specify A Level grade requirements. Sorry just wanted to challenge that nonsense I will retire away from this forum im far to old for it! Well done everyone who get great results as well. Hard work does pay of!
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    To get all A*s you need to do a bit of work and develop your exam technique by doing past papers and learning from the specifications. Usually people say this but when you actually get to doing some work, you just can't be bothered and end up getting 5,6,7 A*s rather than the whole 10.
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    (Original post by simon123)
    Give it a rest. If you want to go to a great university and not just "a university" then yes they do matter to an extent. You say after you get to uni A Levels mean nothing. Well to get in they certainly mean something and also the fact many graduate programs specify A Level grade requirements. Sorry just wanted to challenge that nonsense I will retire away from this forum im far to old for it! Well done everyone who get great results as well. Hard work does pay of!
    If you want to go to the LSE, they judge you on your GCSEs and so want really high grades e.g 7-10 A*s. If you want to go to Durham you need something similar because they really want good GCSE grades. Both these universities believe that the best students get the best GCSE grades. Oxbridge don't really care as long as you get A*/A grades with one or two Bs and that will be fine. Oxbridge don't look at your GCSEs so much because they interview you and if you are clever enough to go but you didn't get amazing GCSEs, it won't hinder your progress. Loads of kids get accepted into Oxbridge but don't get accepted by LSE or Durham because of their GCSE grades.
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    With regard as to whether or not GCSEs matter: they do.
    Out of the top universities, Oxbridge are probably more lax than others about GCSE grades because they interview almost every applicant. The others (especially LSE) do look at GCSE grades a lot. It's one way of differentiating between 2 candidates who both got 4 As at AS.

    I've had quite a clear system for taking exams from quite a young age (thanks to my mum):

    How to do well in exams
    1. Start early. You can't start revising too early. Make sure that before you go back to school for the start of year 11, you are on top of the stuff that you learnt in year 10. If there was anything that you mucked up in the Y10 end-of-year exams, make sure that you know it now.

    2. Make sure you actually understand everything as it's being taught to you. If you get to study leave and you don't understand something, that's a big problem.

    3. Find out how you like to revise. Some people write notes, some talk to themselves, some get others to ask them questions. Figure out what works for you. Don't just sit their reading it: for the vast majority of people, that won't be sufficient to get you all A*s.

    4. Timetable. Draw up a clear timetable, by the Easter holidays at the latest, of what you're going to revise each day. Make sure that you leave a few days free for illness, emergency, or something taking longer than you thought it would. I always aim for 3 revisions of everything. I make full, proper notes on the first one (that takes the longest), On the second, I make fast, sketchy notes, paying special attention to the stuff that I'm not so sure on. The 3rd is mostly past papers. I also fit in a 4th the day before the exam.

    5. SYLLABUS If you don't know already, find out which exam board you're using (it may well be different for different subjects). Then go onto the exam boards' websites and download the syllabus, or specification (make sure it's the higher tier one). Work through that, making sure that you know everything on the list. Backwards.

    6. Prepare. Make sure that you have all your equipment, in duplicate. I took in 2 pencil cases into all of my exams, just in case. Sure enough, one of my calculators decided to die on me halfway through maths: luckily I had a spare. And, for Pete's sake, make sure that you know what you are and are not allowed to take in. NO MOBILE PHONES. NO CALCULATOR CASES. NO NOTES. One of my friends was disqualified from one paper because his phone went off in the exam. He got a D, thanks to his A* standard coursework. Note that some exam boards don't allow you to use certain types of pens e.g. gel pens. Make sure that you know what the regulations are. You may not be able to write outside the box on the paper, especially if you're with Edexcel. Make sure you know what to do if you need extra sheets of paper.

    7. Be confident. You've done your preparation, don't let nerves get in your way.

    8. Check your pockets before walking into the exam. And then check them again. Make sure that you didn't accidentally leave your phone in your pocket, or your calculator in your pencil case (if it's a non-calc exam). Even if your phone is switched off, do not take it in. Invigilators from the exam boards are allowed to (and will) walk into your school at any time, pick on some people in the exam hall, and get them to turn out their pockets. It could be you. Remember that if you're caught breaking the rules, you could be disqualified from all your exams with that board.


    Anyway, good luck to all you people taking GCSEs. Just think that you'll have the best (and longest) summer ever once you've finished them.
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    (Original post by Agrippa)
    I make full, proper notes on the first one (that takes the longest), On the second, I make fast, sketchy notes, paying special attention to the stuff that I'm not so sure on. The 3rd is mostly past papers. I also fit in a 4th the day before the exam.
    Have to disagree with your method - it's better if you spend more time on past papers and mark schemes. In most subjects, it's more about learning what gets you the marks than knowing what the hell the question is on about.
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    (Original post by dumbdunc)
    Also beconfident, and ignore predictions. They're a load of rubbish and just pressurise or demoralise you.
    I completely agree, predictions are a load of rubbish, rarely useful. Well at least they weren't for me
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    (Original post by Holski)
    They help you to understand exactly what the examiners are looking for and similar questions always crop up.
    That's better :P
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    Work hard for two years.
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    I got 15 A*-C's altogether
    4 A*'s
    2 A's
    6 B's
    3 C's

    to be honest wid u the best way to revise is by doin past papers pseically wid maths !! get the past papers for the last 4-5 years and do every single Q and the 1s u dnt understand ask ur teachers revising from notes and all tht is a waste of time jst be confident and belive u can do it if other ppl dun it y cnt u? good luck dnt stress too much
 
 
 

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