How does an American go about funding postgrad in UK? Watch

pbj2050
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Hello! I'm looking to study in London, and while the degree is cheaper than any an American university of equal caliber could confer, when calculated with the cost of accommodation, travel and visa fees, it comes down to a quite the heady price.

So that being said: Do UK university's allow for fees to be paid in installments? Aside from federal aid, how do students fund their education?
What are some ways to cut down on living costs (including housing) while studying in London?
And if there are any US transplants reading this, do you know of loan programs in the US that fund international study?
Thank you so much dolls!
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Klix88
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(Original post by pbj2050)
Do UK university's allow for fees to be paid in installments?
Usually, yes. My Masters uni took payment in two or three installments and my current uni offers three installment payments. However in order to get a UK Study Visa, you need to prove that you already have all the money you need to support yourself and pay your fees, for your entire course, before you get here. So as an International student, you can't plan to come to the UK and work in order to earn the money to pay part of your fees.

Aside from federal aid, how do students fund their education?
The central government loan for Masters degrees only started this year, and it doesn't cover all of your fees + living costs for the year. Before that, the majority of students had to work and save up or have friendly relatives to lend or give them the money. Students still have an element of that, There are some Research Council funded Masters courses, but they are few and far between and incredibly competitive.

What are some ways to cut down on living costs (including housing) while studying in London?
Look at renting somewhere furtther out of the centre but on a commuter route. Usually the cheaper rent+travel will be less than renting nearer the centre of London. However, the bottom line is that London's very expensive compared to the rest of the UK. Bear in mind that the best unis/departments aren't automatically in London. It's worth looking at cheaper regional unis which will allow you to get to London easily for visits.
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alleycat393
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Funding is a big issue for home and EU students and even more so for international students. You're pretty much on your own in terms of looking for things though the uni and your department are good places to start. Fees can be paid in installments (usually 2-3 over the course of the year). Private accommodation is cheaper than uni or so called 'student' housing so try and share. Zones 2-3 are good places to live though you will have travel costs in that case so it's a toss up between more expensive accommodation close to uni or living further away but then having travel costs.
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