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    Hi guys,

    I'm a first year law student at the LSE and am now off for the winter break. I just wanted to make this thread as I remember being in the same position as yourselves and I wish someone had done the same.

    I almost didn't choose to accept my offer to study at LSE as a result of reading things online with people saying how much they disliked their time at LSE. Despite this I went with my gut and accepted my offer. I'm glad I did. In the past few months I have met and become friends with some of the most caring, good-humoured, talented and driven people I've ever met. I'm able to go out 3 times a week, play for one of the sport's teams and keep on top of my studies. All this stuff about how everyone is really dry and boring is simply not the case. LSE students are like students and at other students, just slightly more driven.

    Another misconception is that "all the internationals are cliquey." Granted this is true of the Chinese, but for everyone else this is not the case. I have been able to make friends with people from all over the world; which in my opinion is a true privilege that would not have been granted at any other university. Yeh the course is difficult, but what do you expect, you're studying at an elite university. If you want to doss around for 3 years then LSE isn't for you. London universities, by virtue of not being on small campuses are slightly harder to meet people so putting yourself out there and getting involved like I did is greatly advised. I find that having to force myself to do so has meant that I've become more confident, and have expanded demonstrably.

    Having said all this please don't choose LSE just because of it's renown. If you get an offer come to London and have a look at the campus, as well as making sure that the course is something you would enjoy. London isn't for everyone and there's little point in studying a degree that you wouldn't enjoy studying. All in all, go with your gut and don't let a minority put you off from studying at LSE, as it's been the best 2-3 months of my life.
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    Good post. I'm sure loads of people will find this helpful; I did.
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    (Original post by LegalPrinciples)
    Hi guys,

    I'm a first year law student at the LSE and am now off for the winter break. I just wanted to make this thread as I remember being in the same position as yourselves and I wish someone had done the same.

    I almost didn't choose to accept my offer to study at LSE as a result of reading things online with people saying how much they disliked their time at LSE. Despite this I went with my gut and accepted my offer. I'm glad I did. In the past few months I have met and become friends with some of the most caring, good-humoured, talented and driven people I've ever met. I'm able to go out 3 times a week, play for one of the sport's teams and keep on top of my studies. All this stuff about how everyone is really dry and boring is simply not the case. LSE students are like students and at other students, just slightly more driven.

    Another misconception is that "all the internationals are cliquey." Granted this is true of the Chinese, but for everyone else this is not the case. I have been able to make friends with people from all over the world; which in my opinion is a true privilege that would not have been granted at any other university. Yeh the course is difficult, but what do you expect, you're studying at an elite university. If you want to doss around for 3 years then LSE isn't for you. London universities, by virtue of not being on small campuses are slightly harder to meet people so putting yourself out there and getting involved like I did is greatly advised. I find that having to force myself to do so has meant that I've become more confident, and have expanded demonstrably.

    Having said all this please don't choose LSE just because of it's renown. If you get an offer come to London and have a look at the campus, as well as making sure that the course is something you would enjoy. London isn't for everyone and there's little point in studying a degree that you wouldn't enjoy studying. All in all, go with your gut and don't let a minority put you off from studying at LSE, as it's been the best 2-3 months of my life.
    OMG awesome! Would you mind expanding some more? How are you finding the course - is it interesting? I've applied for LSE Law in October.
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    Your advice about London is very true. I mean I don't go to LSE but London unis are a different experience so it's definitely worth putting some thought into whether you want to be in London or not.

    Great to hear you're enjoying uni! Congrats!
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    (Original post by funkygirl14)
    OMG awesome! Would you mind expanding some more? How are you finding the course - is it interesting? I've applied for LSE Law in October.

    The course is interesting, and the workload isn't that bad. What I've enjoyed the most are how interactive the classes are. There's only around 10 people in each class so they can be quite intimate. But if you haven't done your reading you're sitting there hoping they don't ask you any questions
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    How expensive has living there been?
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    (Original post by LegalPrinciples)
    The course is interesting, and the workload isn't that bad. What I've enjoyed the most are how interactive the classes are. There's only around 10 people in each class so they can be quite intimate. But if you haven't done your reading you're sitting there hoping they don't ask you any questions
    That's nice - how much contact hours are there/time in lectures? Also, how is the sporting life at LSE? I know you've mentioned your involvement in sport, are there many university teams?
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    Thanks for posting this - seems that the good old adage that "everyone on TSR hates LSE" is wearing increasingly thin.

    (Original post by zayn008)
    How expensive has living there been?
    I personally spend around £70 a week on day-to-day expenses and tube tickets, but that's as someone in catered halls (dinner is provided for us) who only spends as little as possible when going out (i.e. just the bare minimum for club entry, walks to most venues, spends only £2-3 on pre-drinks).

    Accommodation worked out at £8.5k per annum for me - for a catered single ensuite.

    Edit: This doesn't include train tickets for going home every few weeks.
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    Do you know what people say about the IR and History departments?
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    (Original post by LSEboi)
    Do you know what people say about the IR and History departments?
    The only thing I've personally heard is that IR is quite a tough course, and that History has a disappointingly low amount of contact hours (8 a week - 4 lectures, 4 classes). You should compare that to the other unis you're applying to, though, as it appears that a lot of unis offer very few hours for some of their humanities.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    The only thing I've personally heard is that IR is quite a tough course, and that History has a disappointingly low amount of contact hours (8 a week - 4 lectures, 4 classes). You should compare that to the other unis you're applying to, though, as it appears that a lot of unis offer very few hours for some of their humanities.
    Oh ****, are people happy with the course though and its teaching? Also do IR and History students tend to go out a lot seeing as there is a lot of work and is a tough course?
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    (Original post by LSEboi)
    Oh ****, are people happy with the course though and its teaching? Also do IR and History students tend to go out a lot seeing as there is a lot of work and is a tough course?
    The IR student I know doesn't really, the History students yes, quite a lot. However, my anecdotes are probably not representative of the 60+ people who study each subject :/
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    how are you finding the SU and events at LSE?

    Glad to see some positivity about the place; there's a lot of negativity surrounding LSE on here and the internet in general
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    Do you think the LSE experience is much different depending on what course you're on or which department you are in? Like different departments have classes in different places, right? So it could affect the kind of people you're exposed to. When I visited I felt that the Law and Management lot in the NAB seemed more active and talkative, while the Maths department seemed pretty dead.
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    Thank you so much for this! Do you have any feedback from students doing Politics and Philosophy?
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    (Original post by ♥Samantha♥)
    Do you think the LSE experience is much different depending on what course you're on or which department you are in? Like different departments have classes in different places, right? So it could affect the kind of people you're exposed to. When I visited I felt that the Law and Management lot in the NAB seemed more active and talkative, while the Maths department seemed pretty dead.
    I personally think that, from a student satisfaction perspective (as measured by the NSS), the qualitative subjects do a lot better than the quantitative ones. Perhaps it's the type of student who does each type of course - I've found your average lawyer or historian to be a lot more talkative and extroverted than your average, say, A&F dude
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I personally think that, from a student satisfaction perspective (as measured by the NSS), the qualitative subjects do a lot better than the quantitative ones. Perhaps it's the type of student who does each type of course - I've found your average lawyer or historian to be a lot more talkative and extroverted than your average, say, A&F dude
    Thanks for the information. So where would you approximately say economists are on the spectrum of sociability?
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    (Original post by ♥Samantha♥)
    Thanks for the information. So where would you approximately say economists are on the spectrum of sociability?
    The economists I hang out with have been very extroverted, particularly the IB hopefuls - IB tends to be one of the areas where you need maximum sociability to help with networking anyway. However, Economics is a large course which shares some of its modules with other courses (e.g. MA100), so you're gonna be seeing a lot of non-economists in your lectures anyway. It's generally difficult to generalise about any given course, particularly when my sample size is so small :/

    However, I should stress that most of your friendships will be happening outside your course, either at your accommodation, or your society/club. It's nice to have a few people to talk to and share notes with before and after lectures, but chances are that these aren't the people you're going to be sticking around with for longer than that.
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    (Original post by LegalPrinciples)
    Hi guys,

    I'm a first year law student at the LSE and am now off for the winter break. I just wanted to make this thread as I remember being in the same position as yourselves and I wish someone had done the same.

    I almost didn't choose to accept my offer to study at LSE as a result of reading things online with people saying how much they disliked their time at LSE. Despite this I went with my gut and accepted my offer. I'm glad I did. In the past few months I have met and become friends with some of the most caring, good-humoured, talented and driven people I've ever met. I'm able to go out 3 times a week, play for one of the sport's teams and keep on top of my studies. All this stuff about how everyone is really dry and boring is simply not the case. LSE students are like students and at other students, just slightly more driven.

    Another misconception is that "all the internationals are cliquey." Granted this is true of the Chinese, but for everyone else this is not the case. I have been able to make friends with people from all over the world; which in my opinion is a true privilege that would not have been granted at any other university. Yeh the course is difficult, but what do you expect, you're studying at an elite university. If you want to doss around for 3 years then LSE isn't for you. London universities, by virtue of not being on small campuses are slightly harder to meet people so putting yourself out there and getting involved like I did is greatly advised. I find that having to force myself to do so has meant that I've become more confident, and have expanded demonstrably.

    Having said all this please don't choose LSE just because of it's renown. If you get an offer come to London and have a look at the campus, as well as making sure that the course is something you would enjoy. London isn't for everyone and there's little point in studying a degree that you wouldn't enjoy studying. All in all, go with your gut and don't let a minority put you off from studying at LSE, as it's been the best 2-3 months of my life.
    Do you know of anyone changing courses in the first few weeks?
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    (Original post by OnTheOtherSide)
    Thank you so much for this! Do you have any feedback from students doing Politics and Philosophy?
    Hey! I'm a first year doing Politics and Philosophy. There aren't many of us (26 this year?). Not much choice in first year, just between PH101 and 104, 104 being a more advanced (express?) version of 101. I chose 101 and I don't regret it, not because of the modules individual difficulty, but because of the stress from other modules due to my shoddy time management skills.

    PH101: Logic - it's a nice change from the essays

    PH103: Philo - Pretty easy if you've done IB/A level philosophy, do the reading so you can actually discuss it in class and come up with "original material" in essays.

    GV101: Polsci - as someone who came into this course with more of an interest in philosophy, this is so out of my comfort zone. Just stay tuned to current events.

    GV100: Pol Theory - don't bother doing the reading for the lectures, it's not physically possible to read one of these books a week on top of other work(and eating and sleeping). Keep in mind from the very beginning that 2nd/3rd years I know recommend that you get to know 4-5 of the political theorists for the exam. For the formative essays though, you'll have to have at least a basic understanding of the ones covered week to week.

    It's not a very sociable course this year but I've made my friends through societies. I am really enjoying learning about the topics that are being offered though, so good luck!
 
 
 
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