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    Could anyone please explain in simple terms about the Nernst Equation - i.e. what it is/shows and how to use it.

    I also have to devise an investigation around it for my Chemistry A level investigation and so any ideas would be gratefully received.
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Erased Citizen)
    Could anyone please explain in simple terms about the Nernst Equation - i.e. what it is/shows and how to use it.

    I also have to devise an investigation around it for my Chemistry A level investigation and so any ideas would be gratefully received.
    Thanks!
    I dont know much about it, but i have a spreadsheet which calculates it! (which hasnt attatched!)
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    I've found some websites, but they could all be written in Japanese for all I understand. I also need ideas for an investigation - havent a clue what to do.
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    (Original post by Erased Citizen)
    I've found some websites, but they could all be written in Japanese for all I understand. I also need ideas for an investigation - havent a clue what to do.
    Wouldnt it be a better idea to do an investigation on sumthing you have a basic idea on then?
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    The Nernst Equation is the bane of my life... it's also an equation showing the membrane potential (in volts: the inside relative to the outside) required to keep the concentrations of a particular type of ion different on the inside and outside of a cell. ie if you have an ion with a charge of +1 and ten times as high a concentration of that ion inside the cell as outside it, you'd need an Em (membrane potential) of -58mV to keep it that way.

    Sorry if this isn't explained very clearly - I hate the Nernst Equation...

    edit: PS the equation itself is (having looked it up) Em = 58/z.log[X]o/[X]i

    [X]o = concentration of X OUTSIDE the cell
    [X]i = conc of X INSIDE the cell
    z = charge on X
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    But of course the Em = 58/z log etc equation only works at room temperature and pressure. Otherwise it's Em = RT/zF ln[X]o/[x]i
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    Whoops, yeah, forgot that (we only ever used 58/z!)
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Whoops, yeah, forgot that (we only ever used 58/z!)
    They threw that at us in our Physiology practical exam. Meanies.
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    Ouch Harsh!
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    Thanks
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Ouch Harsh!
    Yeah, I truly despised that exam, but I hated all of my Physiology exams. Didn't do too badly in them though
 
 
 
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