A levels which get you the most money? Watch

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Dyscopia
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Can you be any more vague?

A levels themselves won't give you money, it's their application that does.
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username2808800
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(Original post by gcsehelp718)
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Its the degree and the uni you got to. Look up the highest paying jobs and find out what degree you want. For example I want to do investment banking or hedge funds. I am doing maths, further mathematics , economics and chemistry( chemistry is most likely , unsure about it but am 100% at the rest). I aim to get a mathematics degree/ mathematics degree from top unis such as LSE, Warwick, Cambridge and UCL. I am in year 11, its vital you and I focus on your GCSE's now and achieve many A* and A and pick the right A levels. Find a job that YOU like and that is high paying and do ur research to what degree u need and then attend a top university. Good luck!
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rosie.mn
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That's not a very good way of choosing your a levels. Getting into a good university, working hard, being ambitious and getting a good job gets you the most money. Whether it be becoming a lawyer, or a doctor. But your life shouldn't revolve around the money.
Richard Branson has no a levels. Just some food for thought.
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CraigBackner
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(Original post by gcsehelp718)
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if you want to earn loads of money, either get in a lot of debt by going to uni and get a high paying job in a field like medicine or become an entreprenuer
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(Original post by rosie.mn)
That's not a very good way of choosing your a levels. Getting into a good university, working hard, being ambitious and getting a good job gets you the most money. Whether it be becoming a lawyer, or a doctor. But your life shouldn't revolve around the money.
Richard Branson has no a levels. Just some food for thought.
Richard Branson is one in a million. if he wants to be rich being educated his bet bet. You can become a millionaire without education but it is less likely. Education is a much much safer bet. 80% of millionaires had a college degree. The easiest way into a high paying job and career is to attend a top university such as oxbridge and lse, warwick , UCL etc. .
http://www.investopedia.com/financia...ire-myths.aspx
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rosie.mn
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(Original post by fleky6910)
Richard Branson is one in a million. if he wants to be rich being educated his bet bet. You can become a millionaire without education but it is less likely. Education is a much much safer bet. 80% of millionaires had a college degree. The easiest way into a high paying job and career is to attend a top university such as oxbridge and lse, warwick , UCL etc. .
http://www.investopedia.com/financia...ire-myths.aspx
I was highlighting the fact that to be an entrepreneur specifically, your drive can often be more substantial than your grades. Business is a field in which you can earn a healthy salary regardless of the a levels you take, it's more about experience and ambition. Clearly, if you want to become an incredible surgeon, lawyer, journalist or other professions which are very academic you will need a degree. The most important thing isn't the a levels you take, it's the degree you get and the application of it.
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Acsel
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(Original post by fleky6910)
Richard Branson is one in a million. if he wants to be rich being educated his bet bet. You can become a millionaire without education but it is less likely. Education is a much much safer bet. 80% of millionaires had a college degree. The easiest way into a high paying job and career is to attend a top university such as oxbridge and lse, warwick , UCL etc. .
http://www.investopedia.com/financia...ire-myths.aspx
Education and a high paying job alone will not turn you into a millionaire. Anyone that wants to be rich (and I'm talking at least a millionaire, which isn't considered rich) you need more than a good degree and a well paying job.

The numbers simply don't work. Maybe you earn 100K a year and you're able to save 10% (which is a normal amount). That's 10K per year. It'll take you 100 years to outright save a million. Luckily interest and investments in the long term will cut that down. So maybe it takes 50 years. Assuming just for a moment that you got a 100K job right out of uni at say 25 years old. You'll be a millionaire in your 70's. That gold plated wheelchair looks real nice.

And we aren't even talking about really rich people at this point. Pentamillionaires are the new millionaires. You need 5 million before you can really be considered rich. Expecting to get that from a high paying job is hilarious.

Anyone that thinks they can save their way to a million by working a high paying job will never get rich. And if they do it'll be long after they enjoy it. Anyone aiming to get rich should be aiming to do it around their 20's and 30's. Not their 60's and 70's.

I'm not at all saying that a good education and a well paying job aren't good, worthwhile things. But they are not routes into proper wealth for all manner of reasons you'll read about it in proper entrepreneur books. You say education and so on is a safer way to earning millions but it really isn't. You're employed by someone else, you have no control over your money, you are entirely dependent on things like stock markets or housing prices to make your millions and so on. You're at just as much risk of not making millions if you spend your life working compared to trying something different.

You say Richard Branson is one in a millionaire. I don't know exact statistics and you may be right. But how many people earn their millions by going to work for 50 years and saving like crazy? How many of those people are young enough to enjoy their money? The number might as well be 0%. How many entrepreneurs do something different? It might as well be 100%. That doesn't mean you'll succeed but relying on a job is a surefire way not to earn your millions, at least not in a timeframe you can really enjoy them. Entrepreneurship actually offers far better chances at making money, provided you are committed to what you are doing.

Yeah, many people fail at being an entrepreneur. But many, many more are going to work everyday, 9-5 for 50 years and not earning millions. I know which one I've chosen. There's a reason most people get a job and there's a reason most people are not rich.
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username2808800
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(Original post by rosie.mn)
I was highlighting the fact that to be an entrepreneur specifically, your drive can often be more substantial than your grades. Business is a field in which you can earn a healthy salary regardless of the a levels you take, it's more about experience and ambition. Clearly, if you want to become an incredible surgeon, lawyer, journalist or other professions which are very academic you will need a degree. The most important thing isn't the a levels you take, it's the degree you get and the application of it.
Agreed. Perfect advice there! Bear in mind that 9 out of 10 starting businesses do fail but if you put your mind to it and have a good idea Im sure you'll be successful!
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rosie.mn
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(Original post by fleky6910)
Agreed. Perfect advice there! Bear in mind that 9 out of 10 starting businesses do fail but if you put your mind to it and have a good idea Im sure you'll be successful!
Exactly, good a levels, a fancy degree from a very good university don't always cut it in business. You need to have a drive, ambition, be willing to work every single day and be prepared for failure. You also need charisma and strength.
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Luke7456
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Its always going to be Maths for good reason but it can be misleading.

Computer science Engineering and Financial industries all highly value maths, a maths degree is one option but if you wanted to study computer science many ask for maths a levels. even Medicine prefers maths A levels.

and those doing science subjects would probably do maths as well.

so its the application, You could go into Law degree and earn great money though in which case maths A level is not essential but even then it helps.

if your doing sales then you don't really need maths a level some of them ask for a degree but I dont know why because its never useful or relevant, maybe an intelligence test? However I have known some complete idiots who have been great at sales.

I would be surprised if any A levels out performed maths in this area. However its slightly misleading because so many high paying jobs or industries directly relate to maths so it always get utilized. However there are many high skilled jobs that do not require maths, but often the A levels to get onto the relevant degrees for that are not specific and the degree if even needed is not always specific.

So yeah maths is a great way to earn a lot and make a great career but its kind of a bad idea if you don't like maths or don't have a skill for it. Their are still many other ways to success.

What you need to look at is the questions that only you can answer.
Where do your main skills talents and interests lie?

from this identify where your greatest interest and potential is then think what career paths or routes those best apply to. Focus on your strengths.
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uberteknik
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Good grief.

Life is all about transferable skills. The career that pays good money today may easily pay peanuts in the future.

For instance, typesetters for newspapers were paid very handsomely - until computer lithography came along and made everyone redundant.

The next round of careers destined for the scrap heap (within your working lifespan) to be replaced by computers will be: airline pilots, doctors, conveyancing solicitors, accountants, any form of vehicle driver, postmen, bankers ......watch this space.

As others have said, qualifications may get you to an interview. After that it's all about your own character, performance, aptitude and ability to excel at the job and not at simply being good at exams.

There are many reasons why most people (even highly qualified ones from top class universities) don't get to senior positions and it ain't all down to the a-levels or university you choose.
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Acsel
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Little thought experiment on trying to earn as much money as possible:

Day 1: Maybe you go work for Tesco. Your team leader gets paid more than you.

So you aim to be a team leader. You get promoted and get paid more. But your department manager gets paid more than you.

So you aim to be a department manager. You get promoted and get paid more. But the store manager get paid more than you.

So you aim to be store manager. You get promoted and get paid more. You now get paid the most in the store. But the regional manager gets paid more than you.

So you aim to be a regional manager. You get promoted and get paid more. But X person gets paid more than you. And maybe it took you 25 years to get promoted to regional manager.

Keep going until we reach the highest paid person in the company. The CEO. They own the company and get paid the most. There's a limit to how far you can go with promotions and you certainly won't ever hit CEO that way.

Then look at it from the entrepreneur perspective. We're going to skip every single lower step and from day 1 you're the CEO. Obviously on day 1 you won't be making millions but you are in a position where you have complete control over what you do. Maybe you're self employed as a plumber or a web designer. Do you think you could make 1-2K a month (the equivalent of that low paid position in Tesco)? Providing a service or product to make that sort of money isn't difficult and scaling it to turn into thousands, tens of thousands and so on is within your reach. In the few years it takes you to get that promotion to team leader (which may bring an extra 50p pay rise per hour) you could have scaled that little plumbing bussiness or web design bussiness much further.

If you spend your life working you allow someone else to tell you what you value is worth and you work for your money for 8 hours a day (often longer). If you become an entrepreneur your money works for you 24 hours a day (not the other way round) and you decide your value. If you want a 100% pay rise you can go get it. Do you think the manager at Tesco would be willing to give you a 100% pay rise? Probably not.
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username2808800
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(Original post by Acsel)
Education and a high paying job alone will not turn you into a millionaire. Anyone that wants to be rich (and I'm talking at least a millionaire, which isn't considered rich) you need more than a good degree and a well paying job.

The numbers simply don't work. Maybe you earn 100K a year and you're able to save 10% (which is a normal amount). That's 10K per year. It'll take you 100 years to outright save a million. Luckily interest and investments in the long term will cut that down. So maybe it takes 50 years. Assuming just for a moment that you got a 100K job right out of uni at say 25 years old. You'll be a millionaire in your 70's. That gold plated wheelchair looks real nice.

And we aren't even talking about really rich people at this point. Pentamillionaires are the new millionaires. You need 5 million before you can really be considered rich. Expecting to get that from a high paying job is hilarious.

Anyone that thinks they can save their way to a million by working a high paying job will never get rich. And if they do it'll be long after they enjoy it. Anyone aiming to get rich should be aiming to do it around their 20's and 30's. Not their 60's and 70's.

I'm not at all saying that a good education and a well paying job aren't good, worthwhile things. But they are not routes into proper wealth for all manner of reasons you'll read about it in proper entrepreneur books. You say education and so on is a safer way to earning millions but it really isn't. You're employed by someone else, you have no control over your money, you are entirely dependent on things like stock markets or housing prices to make your millions and so on. You're at just as much risk of not making millions if you spend your life working compared to trying something different.

You say Richard Branson is one in a millionaire. I don't know exact statistics and you may be right. But how many people earn their millions by going to work for 50 years and saving like crazy? How many of those people are young enough to enjoy their money? The number might as well be 0%. How many entrepreneurs do something different? It might as well be 100%. That doesn't mean you'll succeed but relying on a job is a surefire way not to earn your millions, at least not in a timeframe you can really enjoy them. Entrepreneurship actually offers far better chances at making money, provided you are committed to what you are doing.

Yeah, many people fail at being an entrepreneur. But many, many more are going to work everyday, 9-5 for 50 years and not earning millions. I know which one I've chosen. There's a reason most people get a job and there's a reason most people are not rich.
Its about certain jobs. Im not trying to argue , just trying to give my opinion. If you work in hedge fund and become a hedge fund manager you will be worth more than 5 million , some are even billionaires. Most investment bankers by the age of 50 are worth more than 5 million and before 30 are millionaires. Also investment in the stock markets make returns. But the stock market is just as risky as setting up a business. However if you are REALLY good at maths you can predict the stock market using indicators. My opinion , I am not trying to put anybody down. Entrepreneurs are necessary for the economy , bankers are necessary and so are all jobs, all jobs are important. Any way what people want will vary from person to person and its up to them to make the decision.Half of all millionaires are self-employed or own a business. Being an entrepreneur has it advantages just like other jobs.
Out of the 100 richest people , 76 have a degree.. You can became VERY wealthy becoming an entrepreneur or a job. It depends on you risk tolerance and preferences to what you do.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...comes-top.html

Either path can make you wealthy!
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Acsel
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(Original post by fleky6910)
Its about certain jobs. Im not trying to argue , just trying to give my opinion. If you work in hedge fund and become a hedge fund manager you will be worth more than 5 million , some are even billionaires. Most investment bankers by the age of 50 are worth more than 5 million and before 30 are millionaires. Also investment in the stock markets make returns. But the stock market is just as risky as setting up a business. However if you are REALLY good at maths you can predict the stock market using indicators. My opinion , I am not trying to put anybody down. Entrepreneurs are necessary for the economy , bankers are necessary and so are all jobs, all jobs are important. Any way what people want will vary from person to person and its up to them to make the decision.Half of all millionaires are self-employed or own a business. Being an entrepreneur has it advantages just like other jobs.
Out of the 100 richest people , 76 have a degree.. You can became VERY wealthy becoming an entrepreneur or a job. It depends on you risk tolerance and preferences to what you do.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...comes-top.html

Either path can make you wealthy!
The thing is these are extreme case scenarios. There are as many wealthy hudge fund managers as there are successful entrepreneurs. The majority of people will not go either route.

Of the jobs you listed they also fall into a somewhat unique category. They're people that manage money, or whose job is to deal with money. They are not traditional jobs and their knowledge can often be applied to their own money as well. At which point it's often not just the job that is making them rich. I was talking exclusively about people with jobs, not people with jobs who diversify. You can have a well paying job, have a hand in the stock market and own your own properties. This is a different scenario to what I was talking about.

In terms of return, I don't know how accurate your numbers are. 5 Million in worth by 50 is still a long time and requires you to have a very good, very specific skill set. You'll still be trapped in the stress and turmoil of working so hard for it. Look at the millionaire by 30 bit. How many 12 hour days will that take? What sort of effect will it have on your health? Or your family? Of course the same can be said for entrepreneurship. But then generally the entrepreneur won't be working 12 hour days for 40-50 years of their life. The investment banker or hedge fund manager will. And they're still often working for someone else who is far richer than they are. You can say that both entrepreneurship and something like an investment banker end in the same thing. Both will make you rich. Both will require some serious investements at the start. Both are equally likely for the average person. One offers far more freedom though.

A quick glance at that link kind of reinforces everything I've been saying. 401 graduates from Oxford are super rich. That's a pitiful number. There are around 20K students in my year at Uni. 401 graduates out of who knows how many millions since Oxford first opened. You've probably get similar odds of winning the lottery.

On top of that the artcile doens't offer any sort of causation. It just says that the super wealthy have a degree. One of them (Martha Lane Fox) is the founder of lastminute.com. That is entrepreneurship. It also says their wealth is complied by combining their earnings, properties and other assets. Not just their earnings but everything else as well.

And this is exactly what I'm saying. A job will not make you rich. This very small number of people are not rich because of their jobs. They're rich because of their jobs, in tandem with their other assets, or as a result of a business they started. I'm not saying you can't get rich with a job. I'm saying you won't get rich with just a job. If you want to spend 8-12 hours a day working and then extra on the side worrying about the things that are actually making you wealthy then you're going to have a poor time doing it. By the time you get wealthy odds are your health has declined.
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username2752874
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(Original post by gcsehelp718)
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The most financially reliable degree is medicine/dentistry. Hence, science/maths A- Levels.
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username2808800
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(Original post by Acsel)
The thing is these are extreme case scenarios. There are as many wealthy hudge fund managers as there are successful entrepreneurs. The majority of people will not go either route.

Of the jobs you listed they also fall into a somewhat unique category. They're people that manage money, or whose job is to deal with money. They are not traditional jobs and their knowledge can often be applied to their own money as well. At which point it's often not just the job that is making them rich. I was talking exclusively about people with jobs, not people with jobs who diversify. You can have a well paying job, have a hand in the stock market and own your own properties. This is a different scenario to what I was talking about.

In terms of return, I don't know how accurate your numbers are. 5 Million in worth by 50 is still a long time and requires you to have a very good, very specific skill set. You'll still be trapped in the stress and turmoil of working so hard for it. Look at the millionaire by 30 bit. How many 12 hour days will that take? What sort of effect will it have on your health? Or your family? Of course the same can be said for entrepreneurship. But then generally the entrepreneur won't be working 12 hour days for 40-50 years of their life. The investment banker or hedge fund manager will. And they're still often working for someone else who is far richer than they are. You can say that both entrepreneurship and something like an investment banker end in the same thing. Both will make you rich. Both will require some serious investements at the start. Both are equally likely for the average person. One offers far more freedom though.

A quick glance at that link kind of reinforces everything I've been saying. 401 graduates from Oxford are super rich. That's a pitiful number. There are around 20K students in my year at Uni. 401 graduates out of who knows how many millions since Oxford first opened. You've probably get similar odds of winning the lottery.

On top of that the artcile doens't offer any sort of causation. It just says that the super wealthy have a degree. One of them (Martha Lane Fox) is the founder of lastminute.com. That is entrepreneurship. It also says their wealth is complied by combining their earnings, properties and other assets. Not just their earnings but everything else as well.

And this is exactly what I'm saying. A job will not make you rich. This very small number of people are not rich because of their jobs. They're rich because of their jobs, in tandem with their other assets, or as a result of a business they started. I'm not saying you can't get rich with a job. I'm saying you won't get rich with just a job. If you want to spend 8-12 hours a day working and then extra on the side worrying about the things that are actually making you wealthy then you're going to have a poor time doing it. By the time you get wealthy odds are your health has declined.
I probably dont know what entrepreneur means,lol. My aim in life is do hedge funds and banking. Apply that knowledge to my own money ( like you said). I am more of an academic person so its easier for me, Im not creative. I will invest in the stock market and use my education to help me , quantitative maths etc. I have got a basic knowledge in investing and am fairly good at it as I have done virtual portofilios and predicting of prices. I have also done some real trading for my parents and made some money. Does that make me an entrepreneur or half of one? My job earning wills give me wealth and so will my other assets. But my job earnings will probably be ALOT so if my stocks go sour Ive got millions to fall back on and if I become a hedge fund manager I might become a billionaire. I am willing to work long hours and dedicate hard work and I dont mind working long hours because as you get promoted u actually work less , lol.
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Acsel
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(Original post by fleky6910)
I probably dont know what entrepreneur means,lol. My aim in life is do hedge funds and banking. Apply that knowledge to my own money ( like you said). I am more of an academic person so its easier for me, Im not creative. I will invest in the stock market and use my education to help me , quantitative maths etc. I have got a basic knowledge in investing and am fairly good at it as I have done virtual portofilios and predicting of prices. I have also done some real trading for my parents and made some money. Does that make me an entrepreneur or half of one? My job earning wills give me wealth and so will my other assets. But my job earnings will probably be ALOT so if my stocks go sour Ive got millions to fall back on and if I become a hedge fund manager I might become a billionaire. I am willing to work long hours and dedicate hard work and I dont mind working long hours because as you get promoted u actually work less , lol.
By defintion entrepreneur means someone who is setting up their own businesses so technically what you are doing is not entrepreneurship. What you're doing would probably be classified as investment or money management. Regardless there are a lot of transferable skills between money management jobs and entrepreneurship. The interesting thing though is that your goal is to move into the hedge fund/banking industry. That is a job. If you set up your own business in the same vein that would be considerd entrepreneurship. And if you did well you'd take home the money that your boss would be taking home.

It's personally not the method I would choose to get rich, I can imagine it will take a long time to actually get into a high end position and your money is still dependent on other factors like stock value that you have no control over. I'm personally more interested in the passive income area, building a service or product that simply earns you money, regardless of what you're actually doing. I'm also not so interested in working for someone else, I want my efforts to go towards myself. I don't want my boss to get paid, the government to get paid and then whatever is left trickles down to me.

Regardless I wish you good luck in your venture.
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(Original post by Acsel)
By defintion entrepreneur means someone who is setting up their own businesses so technically what you are doing is not entrepreneurship. What you're doing would probably be classified as investment or money management. Regardless there are a lot of transferable skills between money management jobs and entrepreneurship. The interesting thing though is that your goal is to move into the hedge fund/banking industry. That is a job. If you set up your own business in the same vein that would be considerd entrepreneurship. And if you did well you'd take home the money that your boss would be taking home.

It's personally not the method I would choose to get rich, I can imagine it will take a long time to actually get into a high end position and your money is still dependent on other factors like stock value that you have no control over. I'm personally more interested in the passive income area, building a service or product that simply earns you money, regardless of what you're actually doing. I'm also not so interested in working for someone else, I want my efforts to go towards myself. I don't want my boss to get paid, the government to get paid and then whatever is left trickles down to me.

Regardless I wish you good luck in your venture.
Thanks , I also wish you the best of luck. Who knows I may buy stocks in ur company
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