BSc Economics at Queen Mary Watch

Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I feel as though getting A*AA/AAA for Queen Mary is unjustified. Although it is Russell Group, it is ranked quite low (31st) and 24th for Economics. Therefore it has the same requirements as the top top unis. Should I just send my application to more prestigious unis demanding the same? or will they be more lenient?
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
Life is unjustified, would you be amazed that when I was 17 I wanted to do medicine, now I'm 24
and I play the stock market.
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
Life is unjustified, would you be amazed that when I was 17 I wanted to do medicine, now I'm 24
and I play the stock market.
...
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Azim101)
...
Azim tell me your GCSE grades and how much effort you put in, then I'll tell you what you should do.
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
Azim tell me your GCSE grades and how much effort you put in, then I'll tell you what you should do.
1 A* 3As 8Bs
AS: BBCD but had circumstances

Prediction : AAA
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by Azim101)
1 A* 3As 8Bs
AS: BBCD but had circumstances

Prediction : AAA
Ok, we need to be absolutely realistic here. Did you put any effort into your GCSEs? If you did and got those grades, the AAA might be a bit unrealistic.

The AS's will be tough to recover, especially the C, there is very little chance that will become an A. I don't like it when teacher's predict AAA, because the student pressures them into.

With your grades I would take AAB as a firm (being optimistic) and BBC as insurance (being pessimistic).
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
Don't worry, Azim, my A Levels are worse than yours. I got ACC, when I had 9A*s 1 A at GCSE, long story bro.

I'm now doing a PhD in finance. **** works out, believe in yourself, no shame in going to a non RG uni. We are all human.
1
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
Don't worry, Azim, my A Levels are worse than yours. I got ACC, when I had 9A*s 1 A at GCSE, long story bro.

I'm now doing a PhD in finance. **** works out, believe in yourself, no shame in going to a non RG uni. We are all human.
Nice man nice! Also, shall I make my insurance an AAB or ABB??
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Azim101)
Nice man nice! Also, shall I make my insurance an AAB or ABB??
Just be realistic. Clearing is an awful place to be, I was there. It's probably the single worst day of my life, screwing up my A2's and ending up in clearing.

The insurance should act like an insurance, it should be the grades you get when **** hits the fan. The firm should be optimistic, it should be the grades you get when you overshoot your expectations.
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
Just be realistic. Clearing is an awful place to be, I was there. It's probably the single worst day of my life, screwing up my A2's and ending up in clearing.

The insurance should act like an insurance, it should be the grades you get when **** hits the fan. The firm should be optimistic, it should be the grades you get when you overshoot your expectations.
I get you, what uni did you end up at and what were your initial firm and insurance?
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Azim101)
I get you, what uni did you end up at and what were your initial firm and insurance?
If I can remember (we are going back to 2010) here:

My firm was KCL (Mathematics with Management and Finance), I had no insurance, since my firm was my lowest offer. They wanted ABB I think, which shouldn't have been too hard to hit, yet I screwed that up.

This is my education history:

BSc Mathematics, University of Greenwich (1st class honours)
MSc Finance and Econometrics, Queen Mary, University of London (merit)
PhD Economics, University of Surrey (1st year)
PhD International Business and Economics, University of Greenwich (now)

I got kicked out of surrey with half the class, major corruption going on there, so I found a PhD at greenwich where I pay no tuition fees and get paid £14K a year. The PhD is in finance (even though the name is slightly different).
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
If I can remember (we are going back to 2010) here:

My firm was KCL (Mathematics with Management and Finance), I had no insurance, since my firm was my lowest offer. They wanted ABB I think, which shouldn't have been too hard to hit, yet I screwed that up.

This is my education history:

BSc Mathematics, University of Greenwich (1st class honours)
MSc Finance and Econometrics, Queen Mary, University of London (merit)
PhD Economics, University of Surrey (1st year)
PhD International Business and Economics, University of Greenwich (now)

I got kicked out of surrey with half the class, major corruption going on there, so I found a PhD at greenwich where I pay no tuition fees and get paid £14K a year. The PhD is in finance (even though the name is slightly different).
Nicee! you got a masters woah, and how come your class got kicked?
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
It's corruption, they took on too many students, realised too late, decided to fail half the class. The whole damn place was corrupt, stupid italian rats.

Stay away from the Economics department at the University of Surrey, it's rotten to the core.

But I don't care, I learnt a lot of decent stuff there and made some good friends. Now I have a PhD which will pay me £42K over 3 years (tax free). I take the money and put it in the market with the other £27K I have in it.

That's £69K in the stock market, will hit around £150-£170 K in no time and get a good house deposit from it.

If I'm not at uni, I'm basically stock picking. I spend my free time analysing companies, just robbing wall street. What else can I do.
Oh damn nice, im trying to start stocks and shares too, and tips for beginners?
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by Azim101)
Oh damn nice, im trying to start stocks and shares too, and tips for beginners?
Knowledge and lots of it.

The market is like a bipolar animal, it will eat you alive if you jump in without knowledge.

Here are a few general tips I'v learnt over the last few years:

1) Markets can remain irrational longer than you think, you need to take advantage of this, not participate in it. You need to buy when the market is depressed, and hold when the market is optimistic. Don't ever buy on a rally or sell on the dip.

2) Price is what you pay, value is what you get. You need to buy securities at fair valuations, no point overpaying for even a good company. Use P/E ratio as your primary indicator. See what the market has priced into a security, when the P/E is high, think, does the price justify the potential future earnings. If not, stay away.

3) Use financial information to your benefit. Look at the dividend, is it growing? Have they ever had to cut it? Look at the dividend cover, how many times can a dividend be covered by profits. If it's low, is the dividend sustainable?

4) Diversify, when certain sectors get hit no one is spared. If Italian Banks go under, all financials in the UK will be hit as well. It is the nature of the beast to punish, spread your eggs across different asset classes and different sectors.

5) Check volume and the bid-ask spread. This will show you the liquidity of a security, when a security is illiquid it can be harder to sell at a higher price. The bid-ask spread will be wider for illiquid securities, potentially making day or swing trading harder. The investor is less worried, but it will be harder to get out when **** hits the fan.

6) Markets are driven by greed and fear in the short run. This is why stocks fall off a cliff and why they race up the stairs. In the long run the market will run on fundamentals, but in the short run is it the optimism and pessimism of the market participants which will drive it.

7) Stay in for the long run, buy good businesses at fair prices. Reinvest dividends. Don't be afraid to buy more on the dip.
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#15
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
Knowledge and lots of it.

The market is like a bipolar animal, it will eat you alive if you jump in without knowledge.

Here are a few general tips I'v learnt over the last few years:

1) Markets can remain irrational longer than you think, you need to take advantage of this, not participate in it. You need to buy when the market is depressed, and hold when the market is optimistic. Don't ever buy on a rally or sell on the dip.

2) Price is what you pay, value is what you get. You need to buy securities at fair valuations, no point overpaying for even a good company. Use P/E ratio as your primary indicator. See what the market has priced into a security, when the P/E is high, think, does the price justify the potential future earnings. If not, stay away.

3) Use financial information to your benefit. Look at the dividend, is it growing? Have they ever had to cut it? Look at the dividend cover, how many times can a dividend be covered by profits. If it's low, is the dividend sustainable?

4) Diversify, when certain sectors get hit no one is spared. If Italian Banks go under, all financials in the UK will be hit as well. It is the nature of the beast to punish, spread your eggs across different asset classes and different sectors.

5) Check volume and the bid-ask spread. This will show you the liquidity of a security, when a security is illiquid it can be harder to sell at a higher price. The bid-ask spread will be wider for illiquid securities, potentially making day or swing trading harder. The investor is less worried, but it will be harder to get out when **** hits the fan.

6) Markets are driven by greed and fear in the short run. This is why stocks fall off a cliff and why they race up the stairs. In the long run the market will run on fundamentals, but in the short run is it the optimism and pessimism of the market participants which will drive it.

7) Stay in for the long run, buy good businesses at fair prices. Reinvest dividends. Don't be afraid to buy more on the dip.
Thanks so much! I just created a practise account, and should go and create a real in the following years.
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
(Original post by Azim101)
Thanks so much! I just created a practise account, and should go and create a real in the following years.
Make sure you are buying shares and NOT spread betting. Spread betting can be bad in several ways:

1) you don't actually own the company, this means you get zero dividends
2) spread betters usually use leverage, which is very dangerous if the trade goes against you. You will be stopped out by your broker if you can't put up the required margin.
3) if you trade on margin you will be paying interest on any money you borrow, which eats into profits.

Just avoid leverage. Invest with what you have, don't trade, don't speculate. Invest.

Here is the definition of investment from the father of value investing, Ben Graham:

"An investment operation is one which, upon thorough analysis, promises safety of principal and an adequate return. Operations not meeting these requirements are speculative.”

Stock picking is not easy, you usually need market experience and some kind of degree in finance to make your life easier. It's not meant to be easy, i've analysed markets for years now, reading about all the great investors.

I suggest you open an account with Hargreaves Lansdown, a stocks and shares ISA. Start by putting money in a fund, educate yourself and watch the market. Watch bloomberg. Learn how it behaves, what rate hikes do to it, what earnings will do to a particular security etc.
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
(Original post by Azim101)
Thanks so much! I just created a practise account, and should go and create a real in the following years.
HAVE A READ OF THIS, IT'S GOLDEN ADVICE FOR INVESTING.....

Since this article is about learning, let's start with this:

"What we learn from history is that people don't learn from history." When investors get either too fearful or too greedy, they sometimes hide behind the notion that "This time it's different." Usually they regret it.

On fear and greed
"Two super-contagious diseases, fear and greed, will forever occur in the investment community. The timing of these epidemics will be unpredictable. ... We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful." This is the simple recipe for being a contrarian investor.

On patience, in three examples
"No matter how great the talent or efforts, some things just take time. You can't produce a baby in one month by getting nine women pregnant."
"Our favorite holding period is forever." This is buy-and-hold investing, pure and simple.
"I don't look to jump over seven-foot bars: I look around for one-foot bars that I can step over." In my own view, index funds are the ultimate one-foot bar.

On sticking with what you know
"Risk comes from not knowing what you're doing."
"Diversification is a protection against ignorance." I think he's right on target here, and we all need this protection. We cannot possibly understand all the moving parts of the global economy and the myriad of investment choices available to us.
"Only when the tide goes out do you discover who's been swimming naked." In a bull market, everybody's a genius. But a bear market reveals who's got what it takes to achieve long-term success — and who doesn't.
"Never invest in a business you cannot understand." This is a good reason not to invest in individual stocks. I find it virtually impossible to understand the intricacies of any single company or a single industry. I can, however, understand an asset class with nearly 90 years of historical data. And I can invest in an index fund that captures that asset class.
"What counts for most people in investing is not how much they know, but rather how realistically they define what they don't know." Unfortunately, know-it-alls tend to place big financial bets. Failing to learn from their own history (see above), they keep doing so again and again.

On being smart and being successful
"You don't need to be a rocket scientist. Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with 130 IQ."
Along the same lines: "It is not necessary to do extraordinary things to get extraordinary results. ... By periodically investing in an index fund, the know-nothing investor can actually outperform most investment professionals."
My take on that topic: If you want above-average results with below-average risks, make regular investments in index funds and leave the money there until you need it.
Now let's look at some other Warren Buffett gems that include his thoughts on the value of value investing, the non-value of predictions, following the herd, the tarnish of gold as an investment, and more.

On value investing
"Whether we're talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down." That's what value investing is all about.

On following the herd
"Most people get interested in stocks when everyone else is. The time to get interested is when no one else is. You can't buy what is popular and do well." Following the herd can be very dangerous. Just ask the many investors who staked their futures on technology stocks in 1999.

On predictions
"We have long felt that the only value of stock forecasters is to make fortune-tellers look good." I'm amazed at how many investors take market forecasters seriously, even when they have no credible track records of success.

On losing money
"Rule No.1 is never lose money. Rule No.2 is never forget Rule No. 1." Warren Buffet has broken both of these rules, as I've pointed out. Even so, he has amassed an enormous amount of wealth.
"The most important thing to do if you find yourself in a hole is to stop digging." This can be interpreted as advice to sell your losing investments. But I think a better interpretation is this: When you realize you are doing something dumb with your money, stop it.

On good habits
"Chains of habits are too light to be felt until they are too heavy to be broken." This next quote describes a very good habit.
"Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving." This is known as paying yourself first, and it works brilliantly for investors who develop this habit while they are young.
"You shouldn't own common stocks if a 50% decrease in their value in a short period of time would cause you acute distress." Losses like this are infrequent, but they are normal enough that you should expect them. You can significantly reduce this risk by adding bonds to your portfolio.
"With enough insider information and a million dollars, you can go broke in a year." I have seen several investors lose everything because they followed what they thought was trustworthy inside information.

On gold
"I will say this about gold. If you took all the gold in the world, it would roughly make a cube 67 feet on a side ... Now for that same cube of gold, it would be worth at today's market prices about $7 trillion — that's probably about a third of the value of all the stocks in the United States. For $7 trillion, you could have all the farmland in the United States, you could have about seven Exxon Mobil Corporations plus a trillion dollars of walking-around money. ... If you offered me the choice of looking at some 67-foot cube of gold all day, ... call me crazy, but I'll take the farmland and the Exxon Mobil Corporations."

My favourite Buffett quote
"You only have to do a very few things right in your life so long as you don't do too many things wrong." This is my favourite Buffett quote. Long-term success belongs to those investors who consistently focus on doing a few things right and on avoiding the worst errors.
0
reply
Azim101
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by minimums_ILS_)
HAVE A READ OF THIS, IT'S GOLDEN ADVICE FOR INVESTING.....

Since this article is about learning, let's start with this:

"What we learn from history is that people don't learn from history." When investors get either too fearful or too greedy, they sometimes hide behind the notion that "This time it's different." Usually they regret it.

On fear and greed
"Two super-contagious diseases, fear and greed, will forever occur in the investment community. The timing of these epidemics will be unpredictable. ... We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful." This is the simple recipe for being a contrarian investor.

On patience, in three examples
"No matter how great the talent or efforts, some things just take time. You can't produce a baby in one month by getting nine women pregnant."
"Our favorite holding period is forever." This is buy-and-hold investing, pure and simple.
"I don't look to jump over seven-foot bars: I look around for one-foot bars that I can step over." In my own view, index funds are the ultimate one-foot bar.

On sticking with what you know
"Risk comes from not knowing what you're doing."
"Diversification is a protection against ignorance." I think he's right on target here, and we all need this protection. We cannot possibly understand all the moving parts of the global economy and the myriad of investment choices available to us.
"Only when the tide goes out do you discover who's been swimming naked." In a bull market, everybody's a genius. But a bear market reveals who's got what it takes to achieve long-term success — and who doesn't.
"Never invest in a business you cannot understand." This is a good reason not to invest in individual stocks. I find it virtually impossible to understand the intricacies of any single company or a single industry. I can, however, understand an asset class with nearly 90 years of historical data. And I can invest in an index fund that captures that asset class.
"What counts for most people in investing is not how much they know, but rather how realistically they define what they don't know." Unfortunately, know-it-alls tend to place big financial bets. Failing to learn from their own history (see above), they keep doing so again and again.

On being smart and being successful
"You don't need to be a rocket scientist. Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with 130 IQ."
Along the same lines: "It is not necessary to do extraordinary things to get extraordinary results. ... By periodically investing in an index fund, the know-nothing investor can actually outperform most investment professionals."
My take on that topic: If you want above-average results with below-average risks, make regular investments in index funds and leave the money there until you need it.
Now let's look at some other Warren Buffett gems that include his thoughts on the value of value investing, the non-value of predictions, following the herd, the tarnish of gold as an investment, and more.

On value investing
"Whether we're talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down." That's what value investing is all about.

On following the herd
"Most people get interested in stocks when everyone else is. The time to get interested is when no one else is. You can't buy what is popular and do well." Following the herd can be very dangerous. Just ask the many investors who staked their futures on technology stocks in 1999.

On predictions
"We have long felt that the only value of stock forecasters is to make fortune-tellers look good." I'm amazed at how many investors take market forecasters seriously, even when they have no credible track records of success.

On losing money
"Rule No.1 is never lose money. Rule No.2 is never forget Rule No. 1." Warren Buffet has broken both of these rules, as I've pointed out. Even so, he has amassed an enormous amount of wealth.
"The most important thing to do if you find yourself in a hole is to stop digging." This can be interpreted as advice to sell your losing investments. But I think a better interpretation is this: When you realize you are doing something dumb with your money, stop it.

On good habits
"Chains of habits are too light to be felt until they are too heavy to be broken." This next quote describes a very good habit.
"Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving." This is known as paying yourself first, and it works brilliantly for investors who develop this habit while they are young.
"You shouldn't own common stocks if a 50% decrease in their value in a short period of time would cause you acute distress." Losses like this are infrequent, but they are normal enough that you should expect them. You can significantly reduce this risk by adding bonds to your portfolio.
"With enough insider information and a million dollars, you can go broke in a year." I have seen several investors lose everything because they followed what they thought was trustworthy inside information.

On gold
"I will say this about gold. If you took all the gold in the world, it would roughly make a cube 67 feet on a side ... Now for that same cube of gold, it would be worth at today's market prices about $7 trillion — that's probably about a third of the value of all the stocks in the United States. For $7 trillion, you could have all the farmland in the United States, you could have about seven Exxon Mobil Corporations plus a trillion dollars of walking-around money. ... If you offered me the choice of looking at some 67-foot cube of gold all day, ... call me crazy, but I'll take the farmland and the Exxon Mobil Corporations."

My favourite Buffett quote
"You only have to do a very few things right in your life so long as you don't do too many things wrong." This is my favourite Buffett quote. Long-term success belongs to those investors who consistently focus on doing a few things right and on avoiding the worst errors.
Thanks so much man, you mind if I ask you for any advice like before I make an investment? Thanks for your help
0
reply
minimums_ILS_
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
(Original post by Azim101)
Thanks so much man, you mind if I ask you for any advice like before I make an investment? Thanks for your help
Yes sure, if this account survives that is. Been banned so many times it's unreal. Usually because of arguments with other people on here.

You should start with this fund, I use it as a holding fund, since my ISA is full. I put money in it to save on transaction fees, while getting an ok return.

Once I get my £20K allowance in April for my ISA, I'll sell off the fund and start stock picking again.

This is the fund:

HL Select Shares (Income or Accumulation)

http://www.hl.co.uk/funds/hl-funds/hl-select-uk-shares
0
reply
danish.2000
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
what did toy think of queen mary??
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Manchester Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Jun '19
  • University of West London
    Undergraduate Open Day - West London Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Jun '19
  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Jun '19

How did your AQA A-level Biology Paper 3 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (4)
21.05%
The paper was reasonable (3)
15.79%
Not feeling great about that exam... (6)
31.58%
It was TERRIBLE (6)
31.58%

Watched Threads

View All