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    Have any of you applied for any undergraduate master degrees or studying/have studied one? (e.g. MEng) How is it like? Please tell me your experiences.

    Is it a good thing to do the degree "all at once"? What are the advantages and disadvantages?
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    I might apply for an MSci (Geog) at Bristol, but I haven't decided yet. I really don't know much about the whole masters thing though.
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    At my uni you could do an MEng course and it takes 5 years (Sandwich course) the first 4 years are just like the BEng course, how ever you need to get a 2:1 average constantly and not fail any modules to stay on the MEng pathway, then in the 5th year you do your masters. There were ways to give up the meng as well and get a BEng after 4 years instead if you decide.
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    I'm doing my MSci of Computer Science (hey a Master of Science in Computer Science - how weird does that sound? ) after finishing my BSci - I'd prefer to keep my options open - my switch unis for the MSci (thinking of Vancouver - should be studying there in the 4rd year) though in all likelyhood I'd stay at Birmingham.
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    (Original post by trev1122)
    Have any of you applied for any undergraduate master degrees or studying/have studied one? (e.g. MEng) How is it like? Please tell me your experiences.

    Is it a good thing to do the degree "all at once"? What are the advantages and disadvantages?
    I did an MEarth Sci (Masters in Earth Sciences) - graduating in 2001. As is the case with most undergraduate masters it's easy to bail out after 3 years instead of 4 and get a BSc or whatever. With regards to the course, it was identical until halfway through the 3rd year, at that point things started to diverge and those staying on for a 4th year started to do more researchy type stuff. There are advantages and disadvantages with the system. Obviously the fields of research that you can take on are limited by the staff at the institution you're at and its unlikely you'll know exactly what very specialised branch of your degree you'll want to do a masters in at A level. It may be that you become very interested in seismology (for example using an Earth Sciences context) but the university you're at isn't really geared up to do seismology research and can only teach to a BSc level. When this happens people tend to transfer to the 3 year course then do a masters at a university that can offer the specialised subject you want. On the plus side, there's much more continuity doing an undergrad masters and is a lot less stressful than moving to a new city for just 1 year. You'll also know your masters supervisor better and be more likely to know if you'll get on with them.

    1 point though - changing between courses is usually easy as far as the university is concerned (as long as you meet grade requirements) but can be problematic as far as your local education authority is concerned. There have been instances when people apply for a 3 year course and want to transfer to the 4 year course, the uni's happy but the LEA refuse to provide funding for the 4th year. In short, apply for the 4 year course and then change to the 3 year course once you're at uni if you want to.
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    I might apply for an MSci (Geog) at Bristol, but I haven't decided yet. I really don't know much about the whole masters thing though.
    I was seriously considering that a while back but i can't be bothered now
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    For Engineering, an MEng is the standard qualification if you want to become a chartered engineer.
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    applied for MSci maths and computing better than BSc as u get Masters in just one more year without having to pay post graduate fee
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    I rejected an offer from Bath for MSci in biochem and was just beginning to regret this but a few days ago someone with first hand experience told me the all-in-one idea is not the best way to go about it. It's just not as good for some reason.

    Think I would personally prefere to do the masters postgrad and try it at a different uni.
 
 
 
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