jessyjellytot14
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Hi, I'm in a bit of a tricky situation because I'm currently in Year 13 doing A-levels (in maths, physics and psychology) and I also work part-time as a receptionist at a care home. I enjoy working there and the pay is really good BUT i'm on a zero hour contract and I'm working 20+ hours each week which is meaning that I'm losing so many hours of potential study time.
I've tried asking them if I can only work one day each weekend but they only have one other receptionist there at the moment so then they guilt-trip me into working the whole weekend because she needs to have some time off. It's really starting to stress me out.

I sat my mock exams today and realised that I just haven't had the time to prepare for them properly due to being at work all weekend, every weekend recently. I only started working there in November so it will look dodgy leaving so soon but I'm beginning to think this might be the best thing because I value my education a lot.

What should I do? And if I decide to leave, what would be the best way to go about this?
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Boaty
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
Hi, I'm in a bit of a tricky situation because I'm currently in Year 13 doing A-levels (in maths, physics and psychology) and I also work part-time as a receptionist at a care home. I enjoy working there and the pay is really good BUT i'm on a zero hour contract and I'm working 20+ hours each week which is meaning that I'm losing so many hours of potential study time.
I've tried asking them if I can only work one day each weekend but they only have one other receptionist there at the moment so then they guilt-trip me into working the whole weekend because she needs to have some time off. It's really starting to stress me out.

I sat my mock exams today and realised that I just haven't had the time to prepare for them properly due to being at work all weekend, every weekend recently. I only started working there in November so it will look dodgy leaving so soon but I'm beginning to think this might be the best thing because I value my education a lot.

What should I do? And if I decide to leave, what would be the best way to go about this?
Damn. keep the job. It took me 50+ CV's to get my first job. Your lucky to have a well paying one.
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Trevish
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(1) You have experience which is good
I'm not sure if you have to quit or not.
Can you study at your job?
Can you ask for Study leave?

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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by Trevish)
(1) You have experience which is good
I'm not sure if you have to quit or not.
Can you study at your job?
Can you ask for Study leave?

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Yes, I can study whilst I'm there but due to having to answer the phone, talk to people when they come in, run errands etc, I'm not as productive as I would be if I were at home.
I'll ask them next week if I can have a study leave but due to my 'bank contract', they need me to be available for last minute staff absences and covering for them if they have time off etc.
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Trevish
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
Yes, I can study whilst I'm there but due to having to answer the phone, talk to people when they come in, run errands etc, I'm not as productive as I would be if I were at home.
I'll ask them next week if I can have a study leave but due to my 'bank contract', they need me to be available for last minute staff absences and covering for them if they have time off etc.
Can I know till what time you work.?

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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by Trevish)
Can I know till what time you work.?

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8:30am - 7pm.
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Mudas
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Drop the job You're future self will prefer better grades (More earning potential etc.) over a few extra bucks.
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0xFFFFail
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Drop the job, in no way is it worth it over your final grades next August as well as your university place.
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RogerOxon
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Resign nicely. Either you'll have the time to study properly, or they'll meet your requests. It's not your fault that they only have one other receptionist. Perhaps you know someone who could take the other weekend day?
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Trevish
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
8:30am - 7pm.
That's only on weekends? Right?

If you don't want to quit the job ( or want to try a new thing before quitting)
I can give you some tips to help you study at work and during weekdays

[1] During weekdays, study normal, maybe till 11 PM or something, try to do homework at school in breaks or early evening ( around 7-ish PM or earlier)
[2] Try to download some revision notes onto your phone, or record your voice and listen to your notes or simply picture your notes and just read them at work

You can study subjects requiring practice during weekdays and revise your notes during your work.
Also,when you come home at 7PM, let's say you take a break till 9 PM, after that try to study till 10.30 PM or a bit more if you can

If the method work, don't quit the job, however if it's still hard to manage both, simply quit it ( or take a long break or ask for study leaves)
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fefssdf
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You should quit cause that's just too many hours and you're gonna end up risking your uni place if you stay
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username47781
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
Hi, I'm in a bit of a tricky situation because I'm currently in Year 13 doing A-levels (in maths, physics and psychology) and I also work part-time as a receptionist at a care home. I enjoy working there and the pay is really good BUT i'm on a zero hour contract and I'm working 20+ hours each week which is meaning that I'm losing so many hours of potential study time.
I've tried asking them if I can only work one day each weekend but they only have one other receptionist there at the moment so then they guilt-trip me into working the whole weekend because she needs to have some time off. It's really starting to stress me out.

I sat my mock exams today and realised that I just haven't had the time to prepare for them properly due to being at work all weekend, every weekend recently. I only started working there in November so it will look dodgy leaving so soon but I'm beginning to think this might be the best thing because I value my education a lot.

What should I do? And if I decide to leave, what would be the best way to go about this?
Your education comes first, you need to tell them how important your A Levels are, they cannot force you to work so many hours.
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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Resign nicely. Either you'll have the time to study properly, or they'll meet your requests. It's not your fault that they only have one other receptionist. Perhaps you know someone who could take the other weekend day?
What would be the nicest way for me to resign? Would it be best for me to talk to them about it first, explain why I want to resign and then hand in my letter of resignation, or should I just hand in my letter of resignation?
Also, if I talk to them about it first, should I be firm or tentative? I.e: "I have decided that I am going to resign shortly" or "I might be resigning shortly".?
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Trevish
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
What would be the nicest way for me to resign? Would it be best for me to talk to them about it first, explain why I want to resign and then hand in my letter of resignation, or should I just hand in my letter of resignation?
Also, if I talk to them about it first, should I be firm or tentative? I.e: "I have decided that I am going to resign shortly" or "I might be resigning shortly".?
Tell them that You want/might to resign to concentrate on your study since you are not finding time to revise etc.

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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by Trevish)
That's only on weekends? Right?

If you don't want to quit the job ( or want to try a new thing before quitting)
I can give you some tips to help you study at work and during weekdays

[1] During weekdays, study normal, maybe till 11 PM or something, try to do homework at school in breaks or early evening ( around 7-ish PM or earlier)
[2] Try to download some revision notes onto your phone, or record your voice and listen to your notes or simply picture your notes and just read them at work

You can study subjects requiring practice during weekdays and revise your notes during your work.
Also,when you come home at 7PM, let's say you take a break till 9 PM, after that try to study till 10.30 PM or a bit more if you can

If the method work, don't quit the job, however if it's still hard to manage both, simply quit it ( or take a long break or ask for study leaves)
Thanks, I have been doing something quite similar already which has sort of been useful, but the only issue with this is that I then have no free time. I will continue doing this for the next few weeks but I'll probably end up quitting by March at the latest.
I guess the experience I'll have gained from working there for a couple of months will still be beneficial on my CV and I'll put that my reason for leaving was "unsuitable working hours".
Hopefully I'll be able to get a summer-temp job.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
What would be the nicest way for me to resign? Would it be best for me to talk to them about it first, explain why I want to resign and then hand in my letter of resignation, or should I just hand in my letter of resignation?
Also, if I talk to them about it first, should I be firm or tentative? I.e: "I have decided that I am going to resign shortly" or "I might be resigning shortly".?
I'd hand-in your resignation letter and explain your reasons to them in-person. State that you enjoy working there, but, regrettably, you have to get more time to study. With luck, they'll agree to reduce your hours, and you can withdraw your resignation, but there's no guarantee.

Your resignation letter should say pretty much what you also say in-person.
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Han-Mingi
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(Original post by jessyjellytot14)
Hi, I'm in a bit of a tricky situation because I'm currently in Year 13 doing A-levels (in maths, physics and psychology) and I also work part-time as a receptionist at a care home. I enjoy working there and the pay is really good BUT i'm on a zero hour contract and I'm working 20+ hours each week which is meaning that I'm losing so many hours of potential study time.
I've tried asking them if I can only work one day each weekend but they only have one other receptionist there at the moment so then they guilt-trip me into working the whole weekend because she needs to have some time off. It's really starting to stress me out.

I sat my mock exams today and realised that I just haven't had the time to prepare for them properly due to being at work all weekend, every weekend recently. I only started working there in November so it will look dodgy leaving so soon but I'm beginning to think this might be the best thing because I value my education a lot.

What should I do? And if I decide to leave, what would be the best way to go about this?
If it's really taking affect and showing I would say quit the job if after explaining your situation to them they still don't reduce your hours. Just explain that you're a full time alevel student who's falling behind and would ideally love to stay on and help them out because they don't have a receptionist and you're willing to free up some of your revision time on the weekends. If they still don't allow you to then just thank them for trying and say that once you're more free you look forward to working with them again and resign.
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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by Rock Fan)
Your education comes first, you need to tell them how important your A Levels are, they cannot force you to work so many hours.
(Original post by fefssdf)
You should quit cause that's just too many hours and you're gonna end up risking your uni place if you stay
(Original post by 0xFFFFail)
Drop the job, in no way is it worth it over your final grades next August as well as your university place.
(Original post by HarrisonGCSE)
Drop the job You're future self will prefer better grades (More earning potential etc.) over a few extra bucks.
I think I have to give them a few weeks notice before I leave, so I'll hand my letter of resignation in next week. I don't think they understand how demanding A-levels are. Should I go into detail in the letter or is it best to keep it short and brief?
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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
I'd hand-in your resignation letter and explain your reasons to them in-person. State that you enjoy working there, but, regrettably, you have to get more time to study. With luck, they'll agree to reduce your hours, and you can withdraw your resignation, but there's no guarantee.

Your resignation letter should say pretty much what you also say in-person.
Okay, thanks. Who would be the best person to hand the letter in to? The manager or the admin?
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jessyjellytot14
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(Original post by Han-Mingi)
If it's really taking affect and showing I would say quit the job if after explaining your situation to them they still don't reduce your hours. Just explain that you're a full time alevel student who's falling behind and would ideally love to stay on and help them out because they don't have a receptionist and you're willing to free up some of your revision time on the weekends. If they still don't allow you to then just thank them for trying and say that once you're more free you look forward to working with them again and resign.
It hasn't taken much of an effect yet but I know that it will over the upcoming months. The main issue is that because of my contract, I'm expected to be able to come in and cover for staff when they are ill/on holiday but I won't have this kind of availability when exams get closer.
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