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    Hi, I wanted to know if the following universities did medical law options.

    Nottingham ( Doesnt say anywhere on their site)
    UCL ( on their site it says Medicine, Ethics and the Law but I'm not sure)
    LSE
    QM ( on their site it says Law and Medical Ethics, but again I need clarification)
    Kings
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    I just had a look on the course syllabus for Medicine, Ethics and the Law at UCL and it says that you study Medical Law with Medical Ethics sandwiched in between. Sounds like the sort of the thing that you're after.

    EDIT: KCL does Medical Law. LSE does. I imagine that QMUL does as well. I couldn't see anything on the Nottingham website about it.
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    (Original post by alvlstudentt)
    Hi, I wanted to know if the following universities did medical law options.

    Nottingham ( Doesnt say anywhere on their site)
    UCL ( on their site it says Medicine, Ethics and the Law but I'm not sure)
    LSE
    QM ( on their site it says Law and Medical Ethics, but again I need clarification)
    Kings
    remember many unis change their optional modules every year or so, so its a possibility you it may not be available come your time, or a uni that doesn't offer it now will do by then
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    Yeah there's a good point. Nottingham has some sort of medical/ethics law, but given that I can't think of anything worse, I haven't looked into it at all, and remember - there's always the dissertation!
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    In my PS i wrote i would like to eventually go into the field of medical law, should I write this even if the univiersitys I apply to do not offer medical law as an option? Will they reject me for not researching properly on what modulares are on offer?

    Thanks in advance.
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    Alvlstudentt/NikhilR

    Why do you want to go into medical law and do you what it involves?

    Bear in mind that the areas which you think might be of interest to you now, before you start studying, may be of absolutely no attraction once you get into the course itself. I'd caution against choosing a university largely based on one of the modules it offers.
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    (Original post by alvlstudentt)
    Hi, I wanted to know if the following universities did medical law options.
    That is a horrible thing to do.
    You will just end up as an ambulance chaser, despised by your own clients and hated by the health professionals you sue.
    It is as much of a dead end as criminal law or family law.
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    (Original post by Son_of_the_sun)
    That is a horrible thing to do.
    You will just end up as an ambulance chaser, despised by your own clients and hated by the health professionals you sue.
    It is as much of a dead end as criminal law or family law.
    It seems to me that you don't really understand (a) what's involved in medical law/ethics or (b) what is meant by an "ambulance chaser".

    Finally, to suggest that criminal or family law is a "dead end" is laughably childish.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    It seems to me that you don't really understand (a) what's involved in medical law/ethics or (b) what is meant by an "ambulance chaser".

    Finally, to suggest that criminal or family law is a "dead end" is laughably childish.
    I have an relative in criminal law in London.
    She tells me it is a dead end. Surely she should know ?
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    1) You didn't respond to my points on medical law/ambulance chasing. Do you know what's involved in that area of the law? If not, you might want to withdraw your comment about it being a "dead end". If you do know something about it, perhaps you'd care to expand?

    2) Where's your basis for suggesting that family law is a "dead end"?

    3) The fact that you have a relative (you say) that works in criminal law who doesn't happen to enjoy their work isn't exactly a powerful basis for suggesting that an entire area of law, which employs thousands of solicitors and barristers, has nothing going for it. Where does your relative live and what part of the profession are they in?

    Apologies - I get p*ssed off when people purport to write off massive areas of the profession with no basis for doing so.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    1) You didn't respond to my points on medical law/ambulance chasing. Do you know what's involved in that area of the law? If not, you might want to withdraw your comment about it being a "dead ...

    3) The fact that you have a relative (you say) that works in criminal law who doesn't happen to enjoy their work isn't exactly a powerful basis for suggesting that an entire area of law, which employs thousands of solicitors and barristers, has nothing going for it. Where does your relative live and what part of the profession are they in?
    1. There are academics who write about medical ethics ( and I have respect for them ). The practitioners seem to be either lawyers who pursue tort claims for alleged medical negligence or practioners of the fine art of class actions. I cant say that I have any respect for either of them.

    3. She is a barrister in a leading chambers in London that is ranked in Lawyers and Chambers as being a Band 3 chambers. She is a "senior junior" and has been a barrister for over a decade and is expected to make QC in a few years. Despite her financial success and career, she has warned me to avoid criminal law and called it a dead end. She tells me that the new reforms to funding criminal law (whatever they might be ) will make it virtually impossible for new barristers to earn any worthwhile amount. Her words, not mine.
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    1. What makes a lawyer who pursues a tort claim against a medical practitioner any different to a lawyer who pursues other professionals (fellow lawyers, accountants, auditors etc etc) on behalf of their client? As for class actions in the UK, they are fairly few and far between. In addition, for every lawyer who pursues negligent doctors, there are also a large number who defend them, the hospitals and the healthcare trusts for whom they work. I assume you have no difficulties with those sorts of solicitors?

    Finally, medical law is not limited to tort claims against doctors or class actions against pharma-coms. It includes areas such as right to life, abortion, reproductive health issues (see the article on the BBC recently), gene research etc etc. Does that fall within "dead end"? If not, is it fair to say that your dismissal of medical law as a practice area is actually limited to those who sue doctors?

    2) Nothing to add?

    3) Your relative's assessment of criminal law as being "a dead end" appears to be based on the fact that it may not offer much in the way of financial reward. I have no doubt that criminal law doesn't pay as well as other areas of the law. However, many criminal lawyers wouldn't assess the success of their careers, or the satisfaction they have gained from it, purely on the amount of money they have earned.
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    Hi, does one have to study an option about medical law to be a medical lawyer? Even if the univeristy does not offer the option/module is it still possible. And, if that is the case I shouldnt include my desire to be a medical lawyer as the universities will think I havent researched into what they teach?

    Thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by NikhilR)
    Hi, does one have to study an option about medical law to be a medical lawyer? Even if the univeristy does not offer the option/module is it still possible. And, if that is the case I shouldnt include my desire to be a medical lawyer as the universities will think I havent researched into what they teach?

    Thanks in advance.
    No (and see my earlier post re: choosing a Uni based on a particular module they offer). Medical law is simply a specialism which you may choose to take up down the track. Studying it at Uni may help you in the future but it is by no means essential. Just the same as an insolvency lawyer need not have studied insolvency law, tax lawyers tax, employment lawyers IR law etc etc.

    Likewise, I see no problem with you identifying an area of law you might want to go into despite that Uni not offering a specialist module in the topic.

    What exactly is it, however, that makes you want to do medical law and which area do you want to do?
 
 
 

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