Uni panic! How to find a course that suits me?

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    Hey students,

    I keep getting emails about university and I feel like I need to start looking things up, although I have no idea what I would like to study! How do I help myself?? I have done some research but I'm in two mindsets: either I want to do EVERYTHING...or nothing interests me or feels like it fits for me.

    I'm considering university abroad, but this isn't really helping my case to be honest. I've done loads of quizzes but most of them aren't very serious and doesn't give me any useful results.

    Is anyone else having this problem? I'm only in my first year so I have some time but I feel like if I know, it will be easier in the future. Maybe I should take a gap year??

    Also many people in the IB already know what they want to do (medicine/marine biology/law etc etc) so I feel a bit under pressure to start looking for unis.

    P.S. my subjects are:
    HL: literature, psychology, french
    SL: art, biology, maths (studies)

    Thanks
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    Go to loads of open days and listen to subject talks should help you eliminate some options if anything
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    You are the only one that knows what domain would suit you the most.

    You have to analyze yourself, your skills, abilities, talents and interests. It takes time and it can't be done over night, in a week or in a month. We change constantly, so you have to figure out what doesn't bore you, where have you proven the most of your work, in literature, in arts or biology or any other subject.

    And you have to ask yourself what's the image that comes to your mind in 5 years or so.

    It is a risk you have to assume, you won't be 100% sure that you made the right choice, it is perfectly normal to have doubts.

    Then you have to look at universities, in terms of employment prospects, city, student life, societies, sports club, teachers, etc.

    Good luck !
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    (Original post by Elena.Catalina)
    You are the only one that knows what domain would suit you the most.

    You have to analyze yourself, your skills, abilities, talents and interests. It takes time and it can't be done over night, in a week or in a month. We change constantly, so you have to figure out what doesn't bore you, where have you proven the most of your work, in literature, in arts or biology or any other subject.

    And you have to ask yourself what's the image that comes to your mind in 5 years or so.

    It is a risk you have to assume, you won't be 100% sure that you made the right choice, it is perfectly normal to have doubts.

    Then you have to look at universities, in terms of employment prospects, city, student life, societies, sports club, teachers, etc.

    Good luck !
    This. 100%.

    A little bit of background: I'm a Year 2 IB student studying HL Maths, Physics, French, SL History, English, Chinese and has recently applied to study Chinese at University.

    This was a decision I deliberated with over the course of two and a half years (I went through thinking about medical physics, engineering, economics etc basically maths and science courses). Everyone around me encouraged me to go down the path of STEM subjects purely because I'm good at them.
    Fair enough, I am good at maths and physics and I like the subjects but I could never picture myself devoting 3 years of my life to just doing those subjects.

    P.S don't worry about those who seem set on a course for university already (as you mentioned they're typically those who want to do law, medicine, dentistry etc). Lots of people in IB1 were like that and about half of them decided against these courses when it came down to applying. Not that I'm wishing the people in your year do the same but...you get what I mean. Don't worry about them.

    It's ok to not know what you want to study in the future but a key step to finding out is analysing what makes you happy!

    Since I have interests in both the humanities and STEM, it came down to defining a distinction between what I was good at and what I was passionate about.

    Sure I like the problem-solving aspect of maths but having to read a book of proofs would feel like a punishment to me! Clearly, I don't have the commitment required for a university degree in maths!

    I put commitment in bold here because university requires a great deal of that. It is easy to be committed to a course when you are passionate about it than if you only chose it because it seemed to align with the trajectory of your academic studies so far. For some people these two things are one and the same but for that's not always the case.

    And passionate can be a very difficult word to deal with - how do we know where to draw the line between pure interest and passion, what then does it mean to be passionate about something?

    If I had to describe it succinctly I would say that passion is a fusion of excitement about something and a dedication to excel at it, but even then I still don't think my definition is good enough.

    What helped me uncover what I was "passionate" about though was reflecting on the following questions:

    1. What subject/area of study wouldn't you mind doing extra homework for?
    2. What do you find yourself doing in you spare time (both academically i.e. in direct relation to your subjects, and non-academically) ?
    3. If you had to read a book about something and write an essay on it, what would you want to do it on?

    The essence of these questions is what are things that you do naturally, in your everyday life which might indicate what you are interested in. Then you can start using this as a means of narrowing down what courses suit you.

    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by Marii101)
    This. 100%.

    A little bit of background: I'm a Year 2 IB student studying HL Maths, Physics, French, SL History, English, Chinese and has recently applied to study Chinese at University.

    This was a decision I deliberated with over the course of two and a half years (I went through thinking about medical physics, engineering, economics etc basically maths and science courses). Everyone around me encouraged me to go down the path of STEM subjects purely because I'm good at them.
    Fair enough, I am good at maths and physics and I like the subjects but I could never picture myself devoting 3 years of my life to just doing those subjects.

    P.S don't worry about those who seem set on a course for university already (as you mentioned they're typically those who want to do law, medicine, dentistry etc). Lots of people in IB1 were like that and about half of them decided against these courses when it came down to applying. Not that I'm wishing the people in your year do the same but...you get what I mean. Don't worry about them.

    It's ok to not know what you want to study in the future but a key step to finding out is analysing what makes you happy!

    Since I have interests in both the humanities and STEM, it came down to defining a distinction between what I was good at and what I was passionate about.

    Sure I like the problem-solving aspect of maths but having to read a book of proofs would feel like a punishment to me! Clearly, I don't have the commitment required for a university degree in maths!

    I put commitment in bold here because university requires a great deal of that. It is easy to be committed to a course when you are passionate about it than if you only chose it because it seemed to align with the trajectory of your academic studies so far. For some people these two things are one and the same but for that's not always the case.

    And passionate can be a very difficult word to deal with - how do we know where to draw the line between pure interest and passion, what then does it mean to be passionate about something?

    If I had to describe it succinctly I would say that passion is a fusion of excitement about something and a dedication to excel at it, but even then I still don't think my definition is good enough.

    What helped me uncover what I was "passionate" about though was reflecting on the following questions:

    1. What subject/area of study wouldn't you mind doing extra homework for?
    2. What do you find yourself doing in you spare time (both academically i.e. in direct relation to your subjects, and non-academically) ?
    3. If you had to read a book about something and write an essay on it, what would you want to do it on?

    The essence of these questions is what are things that you do naturally, in your everyday life which might indicate what you are interested in. Then you can start using this as a means of narrowing down what courses suit you.

    Hope this helps
    Thank you SO much for this! This is probably one of the most useful things I've been told ever about university. I think I'll try some mind maps etc to figure out my 'true passion'. I'm glad you found something that fits for you. Good luck in uni! Best wishes
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    When I was in this place last year I had too many interests to narrow down into one or two I wanted to do at uni, so I am now taking a gap year, well I wanted one anyway but it provided time for me to grow and be sure I was applying for something I can't wait to spend time on for three years.
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    (Original post by CactusMaya)
    Thank you SO much for this! This is probably one of the most useful things I've been told ever about university. I think I'll try some mind maps etc to figure out my 'true passion'. I'm glad you found something that fits for you. Good luck in uni! Best wishes
    Glad I could be of help
 
 
 
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