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    Just wondering, as it doesn't seem to be one of their most reputable course and i'm a bit suspicious of them stopping joint Hist&Pol this year.

    Does anyone here do Politics, single or joint and care to comment on the quality of teaching, and how good the course is ect.

    I was thinking of applying this year (straight pol) and I am actually going to an open day soon.

    Would I be better off just looking at places like Warwick for Politics?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by *Tears and Butterflies*)
    Just wondering, as it doesn't seem to be one of their most reputable course and i'm a bit suspicious of them stopping joint Hist&Pol this year.

    Does anyone here do Politics, single or joint and care to comment on the quality of teaching, and how good the course is ect.

    I was thinking of applying this year (straight pol) and I am actually going to an open day soon.

    Would I be better off just looking at places like Warwick for Politics?

    Thanks.
    I guess they stopped the course due to lack of intrest, to reduce restrictions on the timetable, rather than anything else. They did that with some joint honours Natural Science courses as well. Dont be put off applying due to the cancellation of the joint honours.
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    I don't know why, but it's not ranked as highly in the tables as Philosophy or Economics or similar subjects; might well come from research, I don't know.

    Certainly at Undergrad I have been very happy with my teaching in Politics, more so than Economics or Philosophy (I do PPE). The introductory courses are excellent, really good. Been happy with some of my seminar leaders as well.

    There is a great deal of influence from the very strong Middle-Eastern Studies centre, if that's an area of interest for you then definitely think about coming here. Personally I haven't had any contact with Middle-Eastern modules, and probably wont venture into that are during my degree, sticking mostly to Political Philosophy and the like.
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    hehe. all my friends who do straight politics say it is a complete nightmare and the department is a shambles: they didn't even have their own building last year and sort of occupied half of the english dept.
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    eeek! Is it really that bad, otheropinions appreciated, because I don't know whether to waste a UCAS place on it if it is really that bad. I mean like the whole, university, but don't want to apply to a rubbish department.

    I'm thinking of applying to Warwick, Bath, Durham, but can't think of any other good Uni's that are good for politics *sigh* I'm not a fan of London, so LSE, UCL are out of the question, i'm afraid, I prefer smaller places. If Durham igoes, thats only two out of five and my UCAS has to be done by 15th of Oct

    Help!
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    (Original post by *Tears and Butterflies*)
    eeek! Is it really that bad, otheropinions appreciated, because I don't know whether to waste a UCAS place on it if it is really that bad. I mean like the whole, university, but don't want to apply to a rubbish department.

    I'm thinking of applying to Warwick, Bath, Durham, but can't think of any other good Uni's that are good for politics *sigh* I'm not a fan of London, so LSE, UCL are out of the question, i'm afraid, I prefer smaller places. If Durham igoes, thats only two out of five and my UCAS has to be done by 15th of Oct

    Help!
    Go for it, especially if you cant fill the other two places in your application.
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    Bristol? I don't want to put you off but seriously the people I know who do staright Pol at Durham would all tell you one thing: avoid it like the plague!
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    (Original post by TKR)
    Bristol? I don't want to put you off but seriously the people I know who do staright Pol at Durham would all tell you one thing: avoid it like the plague!
    She wants somewhere small though, perhaps York might be small enough...
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    Bristol isn't exactly a sprawling metropolis... What about St. Andrews?
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    I know it's a big city, but Birmingham has a really really good politics department- and the campus is a way away from the centre of the city, based in Edgbaston which is really pretty, so you don't have to be in the middle of the city.
    If a small, good uni is what you're after, I think Durham may be a good choice for you. Have a look at Edinburgh- yes a city, but not on the same scale as other cities and a lovely place to be- not sure how good their Politics department was- difficult to gauge on entry grades as all their offers are BBB but will expect you to get better (Scotland is odd). Nottingham's not *that* big- but again I've no idea how their Politics department is...
    http://education.guardian.co.uk/univ...027789,00.html
    for individual subject ratings of unis- although the Guardian's table is based on slightly odd criteria.
    Link for the Times university guide http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...versity_guide/
    Although I just checked and they don't have anthropology on there which is a bit rubbish.

    Politics at Durham wise- I can't see how you'd be 'wasting' a UCAS place if you've only got three other places you're looking at so far I'd seriously suggest it as a lovely place to be- I'm a Combined Social Sciences student so I don't do straight Politics, and what experience I've had of the department has been very positive, particulularly their excellent tutors.


    You might want to consider Combined Social Sciences as an option if you wanted to do History and Politics together- there might be some timetable issues but you'll def be able to do some modules from each. Normal entry grades for Combined are AAB. Plus you can do random modules that take your fancy.
    Have a look here http://www.dur.ac.uk/combined.honours/

    Oh and I've heard that the Middle Eastern Politics department is absolutely amazing (and this from one of my friends who will moan about anything that stands still long enough), brilliant teaching and really interesting (and relevant for current political jobs!) subject matter.

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by TKR)
    hehe. all my friends who do straight politics say it is a complete nightmare and the department is a shambles: they didn't even have their own building last year and sort of occupied half of the english dept.
    Any idea what people say about joint honours (in my case History and Politics)? I don't actually know which, if any, is the 'lead' department in my degree (i.e., whether one organises everything and the other just provides for modules). In this thread the people who study politics as part of a joint honours or combined degree don’t seem to find it so bad as your friends studying straight politics.

    (Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
    I guess they stopped the course due to lack of intrest, to reduce restrictions on the timetable, rather than anything else. They did that with some joint honours Natural Science courses as well. Dont be put off applying due to the cancellation of the joint honours.
    I doubt with a standard offer of AAA (when straight politics is AAB) there was a lack of interest in the course. Apparently it was stopped because so many people branched out into either straight history or straight politics during the course of their degree (although arguably you could call this a ‘lack of interest’ if you wanted to).
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    I know a guy who changed from straight pol to his+pol and he really likes it now, not sure about this "lead department" stuff though obviously history is an amazing dept. I should be clear that everything I've said is based soley on the opinions of the roughly 5 or 6 people i know well who do (or did) straight politics.
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    (Original post by Wez)
    Any idea what people say about joint honours (in my case History and Politics)? I don't actually know which, if any, is the 'lead' department in my degree (i.e., whether one organises everything and the other just provides for modules). In this thread the people who study politics as part of a joint honours or combined degree don’t seem to find it so bad as your friends studying straight politics.
    Durham joint honours courses are split 50/50 between subjects so there isn't one department that looks after everything. I think most joint hons you'll find will have some compulsory modules, at least in the first year. The 'lead' elsewhere is you, and the other people on your course! But as you're on a defined course and are only in two departments, they tend to pay attention to you, so you're not left entirely to your own devices.
    There is a seperate Combined department with a few (I think 3 full time) members of staff, but they're super lovely and look after Combined people, because a lot of Combined students don't have one place they can ask for help. (because they're spread out over 2,3,4 departments)

    The politics department has moved within last year (so recently that some of their documentation still has their old address on it, not helpful for me in my first week of term!) but they're now settled in the Middle Eastern politics building (opposite Mary's college) and a random end of terrace house just next to Aidan's. I guess during the move things were a bit muddled.
    I like them
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    My two friends who do Straight Politics, I believe, really really like it.

    There were problems with having two departmental locations, but I believe this year that is sorted. It's welcome having a non-Science department on the hill as well! Administration of the department seems ok.

    I'm going on the lecturers, the course content, and the seminar leaders I've had. All of which has been generally excellent.

    That being said, I think it would be boring just doing straight politics.
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    I *think* you can do two (it might only be one) outside modules in your first year of straight politics- I have a friend who decided to do an English module as something different- thus alleviating the boredom factor. Having said that, if you do M.Eastern stuff then that'll be quite different as well
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    dont the m. eastern modules count as politics ones?

    if you do outside modules do intro to psychology and intro to... astronomy i think it is. wish id done those
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    Yes I think they do- because they've grouped them into one department. My point was that if you did M Eastern ones they'd be different from the run of the mill politics modules and might serve as option module replacements...
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    Politics is a smaller dep than History and so the range of modules offered is not as wide-ranging. Also, the politics dep is not the greatest in terms of organisation or letting you know what is happening.

    However, the library has plenty of politics books and enough of the modules are interesting enough. What more do you want?
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    I graduated in 2006 with a degree in politics from Durham.
    I have to say I really didn't enjoy my degree. The department was in the midst of major staff changes and as such it offered mainly international politics or political theory modules. Most of the modules which attracted me to the course disappeared before I reached the second year, and my first year modules were compulsory anyway. There was a significant lack of so-called comparative politics modules, e.g. where you look at the political system of a certain country and find out how it works. They didn't even offer a British Politics module in the third year, which caused students to create a petition.
    The department may have changed for the better by now, and if you really like international and theory modules then you should be fine.
    I hope this helps.
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    Thanks everyone, any more opinions?

    DJdurham, what are you doing now you have graduated? Are the employment prospects good?

    Does anyone know much about Nottingham, in general and for politics?

    Thanks
 
 
 
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