Aear
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Hello all. To summarise my condition, our politics teacher for pressure groups and parties has given us very weak notes on those two topics, with very little detailed notes and examples, rather vague statements such Labour wanting to increase welfare spending, but with no statistics or examples or details. It's driving me mad because we've got a mock in January on all this, and we've got so little.

Can anyone please help me with this? I don't want to spend my holidays trying to research these topics for a mock that we haven't properly prepared for. Any notes or examples you've got, please do send to me! Thanks.
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Connor27
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(Original post by Aear)
Hello all. To summarise my condition, our politics teacher for pressure groups and parties has given us very weak notes on those two topics, with very little detailed notes and examples, rather vague statements such Labour wanting to increase welfare spending, but with no statistics or examples or details. It's driving me mad because we've got a mock in January on all this, and we've got so little.

Can anyone please help me with this? I don't want to spend my holidays trying to research these topics for a mock that we haven't properly prepared for. Any notes or examples you've got, please do send to me! Thanks.
An example of Labour traditionally (key word) wanting to increase spending would be Attlee creating the welfare state itself after WWII, however on the other hand, it could argued that in recent years the Labour Party has abandoned this principle under Tony Blair and New Labour.

A good example of a pressure group is momentum, the group that has installed Jeremy Corbyn as labour leader and that wants that party to embrace more left wing principles.

Then for the conservatives you'd say that they traditionally supported maintaining the status quo with regards to the welfare state, this is called "the post war consensus". However, this radically shifted in 1979 with the election of Margaret Thatcher and the embracing of neoliberalism and the so-called "the new right"; it could be argued that Thatcher being a 'conviction politician' (for example wiping out the 'wets' who disagreed from her cabinet.) has created a new "Neoliberal Consensus" that has replaced the Postwar consensus.

There are also radical pressure groups like unlock democracy who seek radical constitutional reform including the abolition of First Past the Post and the replacement or abolition of the House of Lords.

Would you like anymore detail with regard to this??
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