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Graduation? watch

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    Hello!

    Just 2 questions I'd like to ask...

    I've chosen to do a 2 year foundation degree at college and then go to university for 1 year afterwards to do a 'top-up degree'. If I do this, will I still have a graduation ceremony?

    Secondly, the course I will be doing for 2 years at college is the "Foundation Degree in Forensic Science". Afterwards, I will be going to university for 1 year to do "the final year of the BSc (Hons) in Forensic Science" (as quoted from the prospectus). Once I've finished, what degree title will I have? Will it be BSc Forensic Science, BSc (Hons) Forensic Science??
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    BSc (Hons) Forensic Science
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    Probably need to check with the specific uni. My little sister did an HND in business (and had a graduation), and will also get to attend graduation when she converts it to a Business degree.
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    yeah, two graduations is possible, but you won't have two qualifications.
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    (Original post by The Boosh)
    yeah, two graduations is possible, but you won't have two qualifications.
    yeah, I expected there to be possibly two graduations
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    (Original post by JaneNorman)
    Hello!

    Just 2 questions I'd like to ask...

    I've chosen to do a 2 year foundation degree at college and then go to university for 1 year afterwards to do a 'top-up degree'. If I do this, will I still have a graduation ceremony?

    Secondly, the course I will be doing for 2 years at college is the "Foundation Degree in Forensic Science". Afterwards, I will be going to university for 1 year to do "the final year of the BSc (Hons) in Forensic Science" (as quoted from the prospectus). Once I've finished, what degree title will I have? Will it be BSc Forensic Science, BSc (Hons) Forensic Science??
    So how does that work then? What exactly is the 'foundation' degree? Is that not run by a uni? I just cant understand why you'd go to college for 2 years, then go to a uni for 1 year to do the final year of a degree programme with the rest of the other students?? Surely the other students would be more advanced??

    Ive never heard of anything like that before.
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    whats the difference between BSc and BSc hons??
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    The "hons" part indicates that you have passed with a particular degree classification (grade). Somebody with a BSc (Hons) will have a first class, upper second class, lower second class or third class honours.

    Without the "hons" part, a BSc isn't worth an aweful lot to employers because it indicates that your overall grades were so low that they couldn't grade you (sort of...).

    Getting a third class honours is easy, so it's rare to see people without honours.
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    (Original post by thisbemadness)
    So how does that work then? What exactly is the 'foundation' degree? Is that not run by a uni? I just cant understand why you'd go to college for 2 years, then go to a uni for 1 year to do the final year of a degree programme with the rest of the other students?? Surely the other students would be more advanced??

    Ive never heard of anything like that before.
    A Foundation Degree isn't a full degree, but in order to make it a full degree, you have to do a 'top-up degree' which is usually 1 year at a given university.
    And yes, foundation degrees are run by the university and are awarded by the university too. Your basically doing a degree, but your doing it at a college instead of a university. It works out much cheaper tbh.
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    (Original post by The Boosh)
    The "hons" part indicates that you have passed with a particular degree classification (grade). Somebody with a BSc (Hons) will have a first class, upper second class, lower second class or third class honours.

    Without the "hons" part, a BSc isn't worth an aweful lot to employers because it indicates that your overall grades were so low that they couldn't grade you (sort of...).

    Getting a third class honours is easy, so it's rare to see people without honours.
    There is one exception. 1 standard full time year at any university is viewed as 120 CATS points (or 'credits') so a degree is made up of 360 credits (3 yrs at 120/yr) respectively. Someone who has done only 300 credits technically has a degree without honours - even if all those credits are at a 1st/2.1 standard. Someone could drop out halfway through their third year (or only sit 1/2 the exams) and graduate with a degree that isnt entirely worthless although it would certainly look like that. They would need to complete the remaining 60 points to get 'honours.'

    I think as well that at some universities if you sit all 360 points yet fail (dont get 40% or above) you can leave with a degree without honours provided you got over 30%. (Edit: Which is what you said, therefore nevermind)

    But yeah, its overwhelmingly true that a BSc isnt as good as BSc (Hons)
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    In the past the route was HND (Higher National Diploma)-->Bachelors degree, but for some reason the name (and structure!?) has been changed. You could also study a Bachelors degree for one year and come out with a certificate but I don't know if that's the case anymore.

    I think every so often the minister for education has a mad one and takes as many cheap drugs s/he can find leading to random "reforms" in higher education. In addition, randoms try and boost the value of a qualification by changing titles to confuse people.

    Examples:

    An apprenticeship is now a modern apprenticeship (or M.A. - same initals as the postgraduate degree Masters of Arts)

    School leavers can study for a diploma (which used to be a university qualification i.e. HND)

    Foundation "degrees" have replaced the HND.

    At postgrad level, a new "professional doctorate" has emerged which is often part taught, part assignment-based, part work experience and involve a dramatically cut back "thesis". So much for the trusty PhD leading to Dr. X.
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    (Original post by Perfection)
    There is one exception. 1 standard full time year at any university is viewed as 120 CATS points (or 'credits') so a degree is made up of 360 credits (3 yrs at 120/yr) respectively. Someone who has done only 300 credits technically has a degree without honours - even if all those credits are at a 1st/2.1 standard. Someone could drop out halfway through their third year (or only sit 1/2 the exams) and graduate with a degree that isnt entirely worthless although it would certainly look like that. They would need to complete the remaining 60 points to get 'honours.'

    I think as well that at some universities if you sit all 360 points yet fail (dont get 40% or above) you can leave with a degree without honours provided you got over 30%. (Edit: Which is what you said, therefore nevermind)

    But yeah, its overwhelmingly true that a BSc isnt as good as BSc (Hons)
    Cool. Thanks for this . I suspected something like this lurked in the background but couldn't be assed to google it before I posted!

    When I said "worthless" I did mean in relation to job application where "a good honours" is required. The same for masters applications.

    The Scottish 4 years system offers something different too I think. You can leave after 3 years and come out with a degree of sorts (I'm sure somebody knowing more than me can clarify this!).
 
 
 
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