SAbdulkadir252
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Hey, is anyone doing A doll's house and the merchants tale and if so how are you revising for it?
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Connor27
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(Original post by SAbdulkadir252)
Hey, is anyone doing A doll's house and the merchants tale and if so how are you revising for it?
I'm doing a doll's house and the poetry of Christina Rossetti on the new spec (I'm in year 12 atm) but I've got As on both exam question we've done from the specimen paper.

The key thing really is the question you pick- personally I'd pick something to do with gender and power and make the following points:

• Nora and Helmer are, on the surface, a stereotypical Victorian couple, Helmer is the strong breadwinner, obsessed with status and appearances, and incredibly possessive and patriarchal towards Nora. While Nora herself fits the stereotypical, fin de siècle, "angel in the house" trope.

• You could however contrast this with the subtleties of the two character's personalities: Nora is subtly strong with her sexual manipulation and also her behind closed doors dealings with Krogstad. While Helmer is vain and petty, a good example to illustrate this scene is where he refuses to keep Krogstad employed because they were childhood friends.

• An interesting contrast with this relationship is the pairing of Krogstad and Mrs Linde, as they are essentially the opposites of their counterparts: Krogstad is oppressed and has less agency than most men because of his previous "indiscretion" and the fact that society is prejudiced against him because of it. While Mrs Linde has more agency than most women because of her widowhood which allows her to work and take on the responsibilities of the professional sphere which Nora craves so badly.

• Also mention how Ibsen was influenced by Darwin and the so-called "Darwinian Imperative" and how this links to the ending of the play (use the word dénouement rather than ending for extra AO1 marks )

• For alternative interpretations I use an article in the guardian a few years back called "Blaming Nora" by AS Byatt and also Clement Scott's contemporary review of the play for the telegraph- id advise you to look these up if you're unfamiliar, they're good for the AO5 marks.

Feel free to ask away for anymore specific questions for ADH if you'd like!

Hope that helped.
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LieutenantJ
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(Original post by Connor27)
I'm doing a doll's house and the poetry of Christina Rossetti on the new spec (I'm in year 12 atm) but I've got As on both exam question we've done from the specimen paper.

The key thing really is the question you pick- personally I'd pick something to do with gender and power and make the following points:

• Nora and Helmer are, on the surface, a stereotypical Victorian couple, Helmer is the strong breadwinner, obsessed with status and appearances, and incredibly possessive and patriarchal towards Nora. While Nora herself fits the stereotypical, fin de siècle, "angel in the house" trope.

• You could however contrast this with the subtleties of the two character's personalities: Nora is subtly strong with her sexual manipulation and also her behind closed doors dealings with Krogstad. While Helmer is vain and petty, a good example to illustrate this scene is where he refuses to keep Krogstad employed because they were childhood friends.

• An interesting contrast with this relationship is the pairing of Krogstad and Mrs Linde, as they are essentially the opposites of their counterparts: Krogstad is oppressed and has less agency than most men because of his previous "indiscretion" and the fact that society is prejudiced against him because of it. While Mrs Linde has more agency than most women because of her widowhood which allows her to work and take on the responsibilities of the professional sphere which Nora craves so badly.

• Also mention how Ibsen was influenced by Darwin and the so-called "Darwinian Imperative" and how this links to the ending of the play (use the word dénouement rather than ending for extra AO1 marks )

• For alternative interpretations I use an article in the guardian a few years back called "Blaming Nora" by AS Byatt and also Clement Scott's contemporary review of the play for the telegraph- id advise you to look these up if you're unfamiliar, they're good for the AO5 marks.

Feel free to ask away for anymore specific questions for ADH if you'd like!

Hope that helped.
Hi,

Do you have any tips on Rossetti? What structure do you use to answer questions?

TIA
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Connor27
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(Original post by LieutenantJ)
Hi,

Do you have any tips on Rossetti? What structure do you use to answer questions?

TIA
The general structure is this:

look for the question I feel I'm most confident on; plan 3/4 general points on this that DONT overlap (for example we did "Love is Invariably Possessive" recently, I did one long section on Familial Love (Nora and her kids in the ending compared with the sisters Lizzie and Laura in Goblin Market.) then a second paragraph on marriage (Nora and Helmer in the opening as well as Krogstad and Christine, compared with Nell and Thomas in Maud Clare.) Then finally friendship (Nora and Christine at the end of act 1, compared with the persona and John in "No, Thank you John.")

Obviously do a basic intro and conc.

It's key to make sure, as well as the points not overlapping, that you cover three different poems and three different sections of the play in the essays.

Use quotes liberally and try to include reference to a literary critic for each text (for Rossetti, I use 2 articles by Dr Simon Avery called "Gender and Power" as well as "Religious Poetry".)

Obviously certain poems are more appropriate for certain questions: if you doing a question on religion or devotion you wanna use "Up-Hill" "Shut-Out" or even "Song: when I am dead, my dearest." But these aren't really good at all for questions on love or gender politics.

That's the best general overview I can give, is there any poem(s) in particular you need help with?
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LieutenantJ
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(Original post by Connor27)
The general structure is this:

look for the question I feel I'm most confident on; plan 3/4 general points on this that DONT overlap (for example we did "Love is Invariably Possessive" recently, I did one long section on Familial Love (Nora and her kids in the ending compared with the sisters Lizzie and Laura in Goblin Market.) then a second paragraph on marriage (Nora and Helmer in the opening as well as Krogstad and Christine, compared with Nell and Thomas in Maud Clare.) Then finally friendship (Nora and Christine at the end of act 1, compared with the persona and John in "No, Thank you John."

Obviously do a basic intro and conc.

It's key to make sure, as well as the points not overlapping, that you cover three different poems and three different sections of the play in the essays.

Use quotes liberally and try to include reference to a literary critic for each text (for Rossetti, I use 2 articles by Dr Simon Avery called "Gender and Power" as well as "Religious Poetry".)

Obviously certain poems are more appropriate for certain questions: if you doing a question on religion or devotion you wanna use "Up-Hill" "Shut-Out" or even "Song: when I am dead, my dearest." But these aren't really good at all for questions on love or gender politics.

That's the best general overview I can give, is there any poem(s) in particular you need help with?
Thank you so much.

I don't have a problem with any particular poem but I get confused about how to develop my points and language analysis.
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