Dear Donald Trump: Please Invade Cuba! Watch

Cato the Elder
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Idk what the chances of this happening are, but I hope and pray that Donald Trump does what numerous administrations have thus far failed to do: invade Cuba and depose the criminal Castro regime.

For more than 5 decades, Cuba has been in the grip of a crooked, communist cabal that is as fanatical as it is corrupt and tyrannical. The face of this dictatorial ABOMINATION, "Faithless" Fidel Castro, who spent 50 years oppressing, killing and imprisoning his people, died a month ago, to celebration from lovers of freedom and haters of tyranny everywhere. His brutal brother however continues to preside over this diabolical entity, and is as arrogant as he is senile.

The collapse of this thuggish association of evil should have happened years ago, with countless opportunities presented to the President of the United States, as leader of the free world, to break into this island prison and free the captives of communism. Some might say to invade them would be inhumane. Far better, they say, to follow the path of diplomacy and dialogue. I say that it has been far more inhumane of us to let the Cuban people suffer for so many decades in the grip of this murderous monstrosity, so much so that thousands upon thousands have chosen a watery grave in a bid to escape hateful oppression than remain on that wretched island a moment longer with their families.

If Trump invades Cuba, brings down the regime and frees the Cuban people, his name will be forever etched on the consciousness of free peoples worldwide. In doing so he could not better put into action his mantra of "America First" in removing a regime that has for so long defied and threatened America, and inspired its enemies to hateful resistance against the forces of freedom, and contrast his assertive foreign policy that stands up for U.S. interests against the idiotic legacy of apology, surrender and appeasement that we have seen from Barack Hussein Obama and his moronic cabal.

If Trump overthrows the murderous thugs that now preside over the destiny of that unhappy people, he will strike a mortal blow against his left-wing enemies, humiliating once and for all the far-left agitators that take Castro's Cuba as their model and discrediting utterly the failed ideology of 20th-century communism. I can see it now. The panicked columns on the Guardian newspaper, with Owen Jones condemning U.S. aggression against his heroes in the Cuban administration and mourning the impending defeat of his beloved utopia. The fifth-rate demagogue, crypto-Islamist and terror-sympathizer George Galloway appearing on RT and condemning Yankee aggression whilst expressing solidarity with the blood-stained Cuban Revolution and the bloodthirsty Castro brothers, even volunteering himself as a soldier for the Cuban Resistance and travelling to the country, gun in one hand and the Communist Manifesto in the other, bellowing in our TV screens like some far-left version of Joseph Goebbels in a lunatic asylum about the glories of communism and revolution, the efficacy of terror and guerrilla warfare and his love of Castro, the evils of Western imperialism and the satanic nature of modern capitalism. Democrats in the USA and Corbynites in the UK weeping and gnashing their teeth, the bearded pensioner-politician attending anti-war rallies in person and issuing defiant speeches expressing solidarity with Cuba and Castroism, surrounded by legions of adoring, brainless left-wing students.

Trump will also gain a valuable opportunity to win new foreign fans. I can see it now. Cubans jumping up and down holding pictures of their benefactor and liberator, Donald Trump. Cuban girls swooning over their orange-hued saviour and protector. Cuban prisoners writing letters to Trump thanking him for Cuba's liberation and shaking hands with him in the Oval Office with pressmen eagerly watching. Demonstrations of gratitude on the streets of Havana, the ubiquitous presence of U.S flags waved in solidarity with Cuban ones.

Trump will also shore up popular support through the war. He will appear as leader of the nation more visibly and successfully than ever before. He will unite his people around him, even those isolationists that make up his base, and his triumph will reverberate throughout the Americas as anti-American, communist cretins like Maduro and Morales feel the power of a President who loves freedom.

The whole rotten edifice will come crumbling down. Out of the ruins of a traumatised, terrified people will grow a nation flourishing and free, as she was in old times, as she will be a thousand fold in new. Nations worldwide will see that America is once more a force to be reckoned with. Young men will sing, old men will sigh, old women will weep, happy in the knowledge to know that America is back.

What better way could Trump start his presidency?
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Eunomia
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I'm sure that the Cubans are begging America to "free" them, just as the Iraqis were. Today you can still see the wonderful results of it and how popular and loved George W Bush still is :rolleyes:
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CookieButter
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(Original post by WBZ144)
I'm sure that the Cubans are begging America to "free" them, just as the Iraqis were. Today you can still see the wonderful results of it and how popular and loved George W Bush still is :rolleyes:
What are you saying bro!!?!!!??!

Thanks to the American wars in Iraq, and Libya, and Afghanistan, and Yemen and Syria etc. the world is a safer place to live in now. We need them to launch more wars in other parts of the world!!

#SendMoreTOWS2theHEADCHOPPERSplz #SaferWorld #NotAllAmericansAreWarmongeringT errorists
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Cato the Elder
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(Original post by CookieButter)
What are you saying bro!!?!!!??!

Thanks to the American wars in Iraq, and Libya, and Afghanistan, and Yemen and Syria etc. the world is a safer place to live in now. We need them to launch more wars in other parts of the world!!

#SendMoreTOWS2theHEADCHOPPERSplz #SaferWorld #NotAllAmericansAreWarmongeringT errorists
Since when was Cuba the equivalent of Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Yemen and Syria? It has a relatively educated population who aren't religious fanatics and would generally welcome their liberation. It's been under U.S. occupation before during the early 1900s and things went pretty well. Now the time is ripe for the U.S. to intervene in its backyard and bring freedom to the Cuban people after doing nothing for 5 decades.
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Josb
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(Original post by WBZ144)
I'm sure that the Cubans are begging America to "free" them, just as the Iraqis were. Today you can still see the wonderful results of it and how popular and loved George W Bush still is :rolleyes:
It's a bit different there. Many Cubans (1.2 million, so 10% of the population of Cuba) live in the USA and they would support such intervention.
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Cato the Elder
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(Original post by WBZ144)
I'm sure that the Cubans are begging America to "free" them, just as the Iraqis were. Today you can still see the wonderful results of it and how popular and loved George W Bush still is :rolleyes:
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sleepysnooze
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so essentially another iraq, but in the carribean...wow. tropical.
why not all the other dictatorships though? why not turkmenistan? surely that regime is worse?
if it's a matter of a weak dictatorship and its proximity to the west, does that mean that europe needs to invade belarus?
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Cato the Elder
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(Original post by sleepysnooze)
so essentially another iraq, but in the carribean...wow.
You probably know hardly anything about Cuba.
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sleepysnooze
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(Original post by Cato the Elder)
You probably know hardly anything about Cuba.
what are you assuming I'm not aware of? I know that cuba is a dictatorship - are you saying that cuba is threatening weapons of mass destruction or something? I doubt that. it's not 1962. and even back then it wasn't really a direct threat, especially given the context of the bay of pigs anyway.
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Cato the Elder
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(Original post by sleepysnooze)
what are you assuming I'm not aware of? I know that cuba is a dictatorship - are you saying that cuba is threatening weapons of mass destruction or something? I doubt that. it's not 1962. and even back then it wasn't really a direct threat, especially given the context of the bay of pigs anyway.
Cuba is a tiny island with a small population right next to the U.S., making it relatively easy to liberate. It won't be another Iraq.
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username2585877
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typical cuban lifestory before/after batista: during batista’s regime, the only work i could find was for the equivalent of pennies per hour, where i was raped weekly because of the absence of government intervention in the economy. i couldn’t read or write, but then castro came into power. i was taught to read and write because of castro’s literacy programmes, and i was able to enjoy free education and decent housing and jobs. he finally freed me from the economic oppression and US imperialism.

typical neocon/capitalist: evil commie! their economy collapsed! they only outgrew their neighbouring countries! oppression! let’s ignore batista, down with the regime that lifted cuba out of extreme poverty!
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username2585877
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overall point:

There's a few factors to talk about here. Cuba under Castro was unique in a lot of ways, politically and economically but also socially. In some aspects, Cuba under Castro was able to achieve remarkable progress in areas like education and healthcare, and to this day the nation has what is undoubtedly the best healthcare system in Central America in spite of having below-average GDP per capita. It is also important to examine the extent of political repression under Castro, and to put that in the context of the political and social situation in pre-revolution Cuba. Social Progress Let's look at healthcare more specifically, since that is often lauded of communist Cuba's greatest achievements. Just prior to the revolution, Cuba had an infant mortality rate of 60 per 1000 lives, a maternal mortality rate of 125 per 1000 births and a life expectancy of about 65 years. The linked source mentions that by 1988, infant mortality had fallen to 15 per 1000 (compared to the contemporary 9 in the OECD and 22 in the Soviet bloc, and 54 in the rest of the Caribbean), while maternal mortality fell to 77 per 1000 births. Today, Cuban life expectancy is among the highest in the world at around 79.5 years, compared to the UK's 81.2 years and America's 79.3. Furthermore, Cuba has played a big role in medical development, exporting some $120 million worth of drugs in 1995 and being praised even by such conservative sources as The Economist for its medical establishments which "have made breakthroughs in vaccines, immunology and biotechnology"1 . Additionally, Cuba has made outstanding educational progress under Castro. Pre-revolution, it is estimated that a quarter of the nation was illiterate, yet by 1961, only a few years after the revolution, UNESCO had confirmed that basic illiteracy was essentially eradicated from the nation thanks to an intensive educational campaign. Today, the average Cuban citizen can expect to spend 10 years in schooling, compared to roughly 13 for the US and less than 8 in the average Caribbean nation. So, Cuba achieved significant social gains in the decades since the revolution, and significantly, achieved much greater gains in social welfare than other Caribbean nations aligned with the US. But at what cost? Was the political repression worth it?

Political Repression

There's two factors to look at here: what was the political situation like before Castro, and how bad repression under Castro actually was. From 1952 until 1959, the year of the revolution, Cuba was ruled by a military dictatorship under one Fulgencio Batista, who staged a military coup when it was clear he was about to lose the election in 1952. Under his rule, somewhere around 20,000 people were killed by the state2 , while presiding under an economy that was an increasingly unequal and impoverished nation3 . The most critical thing to understand here was that at this time, the Batista regime was supported both by the official US government and by private American interests, which according to President Kennedy, came to "dominate the Cuban economy": At the beginning of 1959 United States companies owned about 40 percent of the Cuban sugar lands—almost all the cattle ranches—90 percent of the mines and mineral concessions—80 percent of the utilities—practically all the oil industry—and supplied two-thirds of Cuba's imports. All this together paints a portrait of pre-revolutionary Cuba at least as repressive as Castro's regime, and more importantly of a repression sponsored by American public and private interests, especially private firms that saw Cuba as a source of cheap profit. Given this situation, the violence and repression of Castro's regime becomes more understandable, if not justifiable (especially in more recent times). Especially early on, repression could be understandable if neighboring superpowers are actively attempting to overthrow your government and assassinate your leaders. Looking at the broader history of the revolutionary government, some scholars estimate that there have been some 15,000 state killings in Cuba since the revolution, only a small minority of which were prisoners lawfully condemned to death by the justice system. Today, Cuba remains the only nation in the Americas rated as "not free" by Freedom House, a largely US-government funded NGO. However, this is ok comparable to it’s past.

Conclusion
So how was daily life under Castro? Especially in more recent times, relatively peaceful (the last execution was carried out in 2003, with no extrajudicial killings on record), and with most repression being limited to the jailing of a few hundred activists. Education and healthcare remain stellar, and other basic indicators of development are decent, currently placing Cuba in 67th place for its Human Development Index. It should be noted that on the overall rankings, this places Cuba above nations like Brazil, Colombia, Jamaica and Belize, but below Panama, the Bahamas and Argentina. Why is the capitalist one excused?

EDIT: I found this point on reddit, but I expanded on it.
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Cato the Elder
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(Original post by frankielogue)
typical cuban lifestory before/after batista: during batista’s regime, the only work i could find was for the equivalent of pennies per hour, where i was raped weekly because of the absence of government intervention in the economy. i couldn’t read or write, but then castro came into power. i was taught to read and write because of castro’s literacy programmes, and i was able to enjoy free education and decent housing and jobs. he finally freed me from the economic oppression and US imperialism.

typical neocon/capitalist: evil commie! their economy collapsed! they only outgrew their neighbouring countries! oppression! let’s ignore batista, down with the regime that lifted cuba out of extreme poverty!
LOL what propagandistic drivel! Cuba already had the highest literacy rate in Latin America before Castro came to power. Castro simply built on the progress that had already been made. And it isn't exactly hard to teach everyone on a tiny island how to read and write when you have complete control through the state and can send soldiers to every single corner of the country, even to the most remote villages. And what's the point of being able to read and write if everything is censored and controlled by the government?

Batista wasn't so bad. Cuba's industrial workers had the highest wages in Latin America. Yes, there was corruption and oppression, but he wasn't any worse than your typical, run-of-the-mill Latin American caudillo. Ironically, he was mixed-race, as were many members of his government, and was looked down on by the white elite into which Castro was born. That makes laughable the claim on the part of apologists for the communist tyranny that Castro eliminated racism in Cuba.

"Free education" - you mean free propaganda and indoctrination, right?

"Decent housing" - you mean the sub-standard housing which gets passed to some complete stranger after your death, giving you no incentive to maintain it?

"Economic oppression", "US imperialism" rofl, standard leftist buzzwords.
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CookieButter
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(Original post by Cato the Elder)
Since when was Cuba the equivalent of Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Yemen and Syria? It has a relatively educated population who aren't religious fanatics and would generally welcome their liberation. It's been under U.S. occupation before during the early 1900s and things went pretty well. Now the time is ripe for the U.S. to intervene in its backyard and bring freedom to the Cuban people after doing nothing for 5 decades.
Aren't you the same guy that started a thread a few weeks ago wanting Britain to intervene more in the war in Syria and help the 'rebels' more in that conflict?

Listen my man....the only uneducated, fanatics in this world are your terrorist buds in Syria and your terrorist state that is America...this world would be a million times better place to live in without these two groups of people in it....starting wars based on lies, imposing their cultures on and slaughtering other people....
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username2585877
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(Original post by Cato the Elder)
LOL what propagandistic drivel! Cuba already had the highest literacy rate in Latin America before Castro came to power. Castro simply built on the progress that had already been made. And it isn't exactly hard to teach everyone on a tiny island how to read and write when you have complete control through the state and can send soldiers to every single corner of the country, even to the most remote villages. And what's the point of being able to read and write if everything is censored and controlled by the government?

Batista wasn't so bad. Cuba's industrial workers had the highest wages in Latin America. Yes, there was corruption and oppression, but he wasn't any worse than your typical, run-of-the-mill Latin American caudillo. Ironically, he was mixed-race, as were many members of his government, and was looked down on by the white elite into which Castro was born. That makes laughable the claim on the part of apologists for the communist tyranny that Castro eliminated racism in Cuba.

"Free education" - you mean free propaganda and indoctrination, right?

"Decent housing" - you mean the sub-standard housing which gets passed to some complete stranger after your death, giving you no incentive to maintain it?

"Economic oppression", "US imperialism" rofl, standard leftist buzzwords.
during batista the literacy rate was circa 60% and castro raised it to 96% in just two years. considering there are many cuban doctors, many many many, the education mustn’t be that much “propaganda”. how would you know? and yes, decent housing comparably to the past. and economic oppression and US imperialism are buzzwords bc they’re genuine issues
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sleepysnooze
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(Original post by Cato the Elder)
Cuba is a tiny island with a small population right next to the U.S., making it relatively easy to liberate. It won't be another Iraq.
so like I said, you'd then be saying that belarus needs to be invaded by the strong democracies of europe
but on a wider point here: how are you actually justifying war here in principle? are you saying that you're justifying war because it can be won easily or are you justifying it because the intentions are good? I assume good intentions or else that would mean a war like the second persian gulf war was "good"...

the west's intentions in the iraq war were surely "good" no matter how you look at it - the american government thought it would be getting richer through oil - how is that not a good intention? or if it is good via liberating the iraqis from saddam, how is that not a good intention too? and obviously, stopping a country from using WMDs against the west is justified regardless of "good intentions" because it is self-defence (although obviously there were no WMDs and they knew that anyway).
also, through this, are you conflating good intentions with good outcomes? really? war kills people. war kills both our soldiers and both their soldiers AND civilians. even if *some* of our soldiers die, that's still essentially putting our own citizens (who happen to be soldiers sometimes in this case) to death for an irrelevant cause. cuba in terms of the USA is not a threat to national security or a risk to citizens' lives, so why should we risk citizens' lives through a war? why should we work for cuban lives and not american lives in this example when we are in the shoes of america? cubans don't pay american taxes, why should they get the benefit of both the american public spending (via those taxes) AND the blood sacrifice of american soldiers? I just do not understand that at all. american soldiers should exist for the security of americans, not cubans. cubans are protected via their own governments. and remember: the job of a government is protection, not necessarily democracy. would you rather a democracy without security than a dictatorship whereby at least you can live so long as you "behave"? if you are saying that it is legislate to wave a big stick around on the global stage to try and control the affairs of other nations, that is IMPERIALISM.

honestly, even if we concede that democracy should be the form of government in every state, democracies do NOT have a license to just invade countries that they disagree with. they should not accelerate the process of democratisation of dictatorships from the outside either - nations must fight their own revolutions, just like democracies today do this all by themselves. when was it that a bigger country helped britain become the democracy it is today? oh yeah that's right: ****ing never. so why would we give money and blood to other countries to give them what they have never and will never give to us?
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Cato the Elder
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(Original post by Lord Samosa)
How discontent are you with your life? that you spend your time writing all that, on a student forum, with so much rage thinking your opinion matters. Oh my lord, you need help. :toofunny:
Are you going to contribute anything to the discussion or...?
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Lord Samosa
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(Original post by Cato the Elder)
Are you going to contribute anything to the discussion or...?
No because this discussion is so silly. And others have raised the points I would've raised.
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Enginerd.
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Has Oil been discovered in Cuba recently? Or a new reserve by any chance?

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CookieButter
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(Original post by Cato the Elder)
You sound like a crazed anti-American nutter. Best not to engage in any type of intellectual discourse with you.
being called a crazed nutter by a terrorist sympathiser comes as praise to me.

My man, the only form of discourse your sorts believe in is the one that involves blunts knifes, people's necks and wars and conflicts....so thanks but no thanks.
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