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UK travelling watch

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    (Original post by Skater)
    Hi, I need advice from u :rolleyes: . I'm going to participate in an international project in the UK, and I have a free week after the project. Not that I want to go sightseeing there, but i'd like to see and hear smth really interesting and really English. thanx
    Be sure to bring lots of money with you. I was reading the other day that the UK is expensive place in the world (next to Japan).
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    (Original post by roseonthegrave)
    If "Friends" is to be believed you can find Richard Branson selling big novelty hats on the side of the road.
    Ye, thanx, just the thing I need....
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    (Original post by Skater)
    i'd like to see and hear smth really interesting and really English. thanx
    So why go using the stupid and offensive term "UK"? Why not say England if that is what you are referring to?
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    (Original post by Pencil)
    Be sure to bring lots of money with you. I was reading the other day that the UK is expensive place in the world (next to Japan).
    That's true...I'll try to be penny-wise and not pound-foolish :rolleyes:

    (Original post by polthegael)
    So why go using the stupid and offensive term "UK"? Why not say England if that is what you are referring to?
    Football hooliganism seems to be a specifically English phenomenon.
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    (Original post by roseonthegrave)
    Football hooliganism seems to be a specifically English phenomenon.
    And...

    England has a lot of great things as well as football hooligans!

    Stonehenge, Offa's Dyke, New Forest, Lake District, etc...

    Why do foreigners have to go throwing in terms which are offensive to the Irish (and a lot of Welsh/Scots as well, I'd guess...)?
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    So why go using the stupid and offensive term "UK"? Why not say England if that is what you are referring to?
    excuse me, I do not see anything offensive in the term, may be it is official... And what is more, I'll be in Wales for all the time and only 3 days in London.
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    And...

    England has a lot of great things as well as football hooligans!

    Stonehenge, Offa's Dyke, New Forest, Lake District, etc...

    Why do foreigners have to go throwing in terms which are offensive to the Irish (and a lot of Welsh/Scots as well, I'd guess...)?
    Why is it ofeensive? Just explain me, please and i'll not use it
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    (Original post by roseonthegrave)
    Football hooliganism seems to be a specifically English phenomenon.
    :confused: How can you say that when Cardiff City fans are one of the more well known for it?

    (Original post by -Emmz-)
    :confused: How can you say that when Cardiff City fans are one of the more well known for it?
    Well, if it would make you feel better I can take it all back.

    Oh, no, wait...
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    (Original post by Skater)
    Why is it ofeensive? Just explain me, please and i'll not use it
    Because you say you want to see the UK, and then next sentence say something about "typically English" Our celtic friends object to that a lot

    Come to Shropshire! It's oh-so-exciting, really Well, ok, it's not really, but it's the epitome of rural England in most of its areas.

    You probably should visit either Oxford or Cambridge, if you're going to do the tourist thing. And obviously Cambridge is the superior
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    (Original post by roseonthegrave)
    Well, if it would make you feel better I can take it all back.

    Oh, no, wait...
    Makes no odds to me, I was just wondering you may not have known about the Cardiff City fans, which mean it's not specifically English *shrugs*

    (Original post by -Emmz-)
    Makes no odds to me, I was just wondering you may not have known about the Cardiff City fans, which mean it's not specifically English *shrugs*
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Because you say you want to see the UK, and then next sentence say something about "typically English" Our celtic friends object to that a lot
    now i've got it. But celtic culture is even more interesting for me. ruther thoughtless remark it was.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Come to Shropshire! It's oh-so-exciting, really Well, ok, it's not really, but it's the epitome of rural England in most of its areas.

    You probably should visit either Oxford or Cambridge, if you're going to do the tourist thing. And obviously Cambridge is the superior
    thanx for inivitation
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    (Original post by Skater)
    excuse me, I do not see anything offensive in the term, may be ruther official... And what is more, I'll be in Wales for much of time and only about 3 days in London.
    Then i'd suggest going to Bethesda (a wee village near Bangor) and tell the locals how great the "UK" is. I could certainly tell you lots of places to go to in Ireland to spout that crap but then you'd probably end up in a pool of blood somewhere...

    On the other hand, I doubt anyone will understand your English anyway if your posts here are anything to go by... :mad:
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    "I thank you for your courtesy"
    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by polthegael)
    So why go using the stupid and offensive term "UK"? Why not say England if that is what you are referring to?
    Most people (especially foreigners) don't realise some people find the term offensive - it is after all an official term.

    Point it out politely to people if you don't like the term, but don't have a go at people for using what is a correct term.
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    What kind of thing do you want to do / see. Do you like countryside/ seaside / cities?

    Personally if this is a one off chance I'd speand 1 or 2 days in London. Buy a ticket for the tourist bus - the tickets last for 24 hours and will take you past all the major tourist attractions. If you see anything you fancy then get of the bus.

    For a bit od seaside I'd go to either Brighton or Blackpool. They are not the nicest seaside towns, they don't have the best beaches but they are both unique. Blackpool also has a theme park next to the sea so you get to go on some good roller coasters, you can buy rock and really tacky souveniers. Brighton has more of a hippy feel and the lanes offer some great shopping but isn't cheap. You can do Brighton as a day trip from London.

    For beautiful countryside, well there's loads. The lake district, Shropshire, Cornwall....................

    So maybe for a week:

    2 days in London, do the tourist bus and see a show.

    get a train to Blackpool - go through aome nice countryside spend some time on the pleasure beach and have a night or two there - B+B's there are really cheap and you'll get a proper English Breakfast and then from there go up to the Lakes - nice countryside and plenty of youth hostels if you are short of cash.

    Or London - Brighton - Devon / Cornwall.

    There are loads of other things you could do. In my opinion one of the above would give you a taste of England. You'll have to come back to see the rest of the UK. (we don't all have a problem with that term).
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    Thanks for the tip
    (Original post by sashh)
    (we don't all have a problem with that term).
    Ye i didn't really mean to hurt smb.
 
 
 
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