Edexcel IGCSE English language - should I quote from article?

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moon4
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I really need some help quickly. I have to do an assignment for Edexcel igcse English language, where I have to read an article from the Big Issue. This Big Issue article discusses the influence of a writer on the contemporary book market. On question 1 for this assignment, I have to summarise using my own words as much as possible, the information I am given about the style of the book author and other authors that the article discusses.

To get the highest grade possible, should I quote from the article such as X put "languages and charts" into his books and do it like that or should i just describe what the article says without using any quotes? thanks
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Trevish
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You can as As mentioned in xxx/ As per the famous newspaper xxx
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moon4
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(Original post by Trevish)
You can as As mentioned in xxx/ As per the famous newspaper xxx
Sorry don't understand. Can you explain please?
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RizK
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Why would you put "languages and charts" in quotation marks? it looks weird.

afaik, if you are to summarise a passage, you don't have to write it again as a third person. Think of yourself as the author of the article then rewrite the whole thing, condensed and concise.

Also, small tip; just because it says Use your own words, don't abuse a thesaurus. Read the article, let the meaning sink in, note the important points then write it all again. No need to put "languages and charts" in quotation marks as it makes it look accusory or just weird.
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moon4
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(Original post by RizK)
Why would you put "languages and charts" in quotation marks? it looks weird.

afaik, if you are to summarise a passage, you don't have to write it again as a third person. Think of yourself as the author of the article then rewrite the whole thing, condensed and concise.

Also, small tip; just because it says Use your own words, don't abuse a thesaurus. Read the article, let the meaning sink in, note the important points then write it all again. No need to put "languages and charts" in quotation marks as it makes it look accusory or just weird.
Thanks for the help. I guess writing in third person though, is exactly what I have started doing. How else should I write? I am essentially reporting on what the article discusses
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RizK
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Can you please clarify, or maybe show which question you need help for? I'll assist. Sometimes writing in third person is what you need.


I wasn't taught how exactly to answer those sort of questions, but I was able to get an A* following the format of

The writer has mentioned the use of "X and Y" which is important in Z. *details about the effect*

Which I came up on my own, and is really my own style. You can have your own style as long as it makes sense and doesn't look weird. If you can post the exact question, I would be able to help you with formatting your answer.
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moon4
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(Original post by RizK)
Can you please clarify, or maybe show which question you need help for? I'll assist. Sometimes writing in third person is what you need.


I wasn't taught how exactly to answer those sort of questions, but I was able to get an A* following the format of

The writer has mentioned the use of "X and Y" which is important in Z. *details about the effect*

Which I came up on my own, and is really my own style. You can have your own style as long as it makes sense and doesn't look weird. If you can post the exact question, I would be able to help you with formatting your answer.
This is the question:

"Using your own words as far as possible, summarise the information you are given about "Tolkien-style" writing and writers."

The article obviously discusses Tolkien and his influence
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RizK
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Read the article, learn the information, then dish it out in your own words.

Imagine you are writing a similar article. It wouldn't be wrong to copy the style of the original article.

Make a mind map. Jot down the important points.

Then start writing your own article.

If the original article says, for example, "Tolkien has used Charts and Graphs in his books, which have inspired other authors to use charts in their own books", then your version would say something like:

Tolkien has made use of diagrams in his works, which in turn has influenced other authors to do the same.

You don't have to use quotation marks. Keep in mind that you are asked to change the words, not the meaning, so don't get carried away.

Also, if I'm right, the article discusses the influence tolkien gave to other authors, while you're supposed to write about the other authors works themselves? Try not to focus too much on the influence aspect, and try to focus on the "tolkien did this, they did that" kind of thing. I just get a slight feeling that the topic may be different, thats all.


good luck
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moon4
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(Original post by RizK)
Read the article, learn the information, then dish it out in your own words.

Imagine you are writing a similar article. It wouldn't be wrong to copy the style of the original article.

Make a mind map. Jot down the important points.

Then start writing your own article.

If the original article says, for example, "Tolkien has used Charts and Graphs in his books, which have inspired other authors to use charts in their own books", then your version would say something like:

Tolkien has made use of diagrams in his works, which in turn has influenced other authors to do the same.

You don't have to use quotation marks. Keep in mind that you are asked to change the words, not the meaning, so don't get carried away.

Also, if I'm right, the article discusses the influence tolkien gave to other authors, while you're supposed to write about the other authors works themselves? Try not to focus too much on the influence aspect, and try to focus on the "tolkien did this, they did that" kind of thing. I just get a slight feeling that the topic may be different, thats all.


good luck
Thank you. I will try this tomorrow. There is actually a second question for this big issue article about Tolkien and it is, "Explore the ways in which the writer uses language to engage the reader. Use specific samples from the text to support the points that you make."

Have you got any advise what I should do for this question? Thanks again
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RizK
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You would go along the lines of:

The writer has used x to y the reader. This may spark the interest/curiosity/suspense in a reader, and so prompt him to keep attached to the atricle. for example, the writer has said "xxxxxxx" which makes the reader yyyyyy.

Follow the PEEL structure for paragraphs. (google it)

what x and y are in this situation is up to you to learn and understand. For example, the writer has used suspense as an instrument to make the reader feel curious about what "charts and diagrams" are mentioned in the article, which makes the reader read on till they have satisfactorily found the answer....

that was a very rudimentary answer, i just hope you catch my drift.
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moon4
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(Original post by RizK)
You would go along the lines of:

The writer has used x to y the reader. This may spark the interest/curiosity/suspense in a reader, and so prompt him to keep attached to the atricle. for example, the writer has said "xxxxxxx" which makes the reader yyyyyy.

Follow the PEEL structure for paragraphs. (google it)

what x and y are in this situation is up to you to learn and understand. For example, the writer has used suspense as an instrument to make the reader feel curious about what "charts and diagrams" are mentioned in the article, which makes the reader read on till they have satisfactorily found the answer....

that was a very rudimentary answer, i just hope you catch my drift.
Thanks. If somebody is quoted, should I mention that person's name who gave the quote and then put what that person is quoted as saying in my own words, or just leave out their name entirely. For example if the text says, "Alex Kelly says, "Tolkien has inspired many contemporary authors" - should I mention the author of the quote's name?

Also, in regards to the second question about language in the article, should I quote examples from the big issue article?
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RizK
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Usually if you are using quotation marks, you should state it verbatim, so if for example, you read:

"Capybaras are an important element in the local brazilian ecosystem" - Kelly

You can't state it as:

Kelly has said "Capybaras are vital for the local ecosystem"

If you want to change the words within the quote, then please don't use quotation marks, say it in a passive voice instead.


Getting to your question though, you need not mention the name of the author of the quote unless it really is necessary - that is, if there are a heckload of other quotes that the examiner will have to read through to find what you have mentioned, or if it stands out for some reason. You know what I mean?

As obscene as it sounds, if you want good marks, you have to make your answer something the examiner would enjoy reading/find easy to read. That should be a goal of yours, as answers that make the examiner go through a big inconvenience would make the examiner annoyed and make them want to rob you of marks.

So do it if you think it would make the examiner's job easier.
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moon4
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(Original post by RizK)
Usually if you are using quotation marks, you should state it verbatim, so if for example, you read:

"Capybaras are an important element in the local brazilian ecosystem" - Kelly

You can't state it as:

Kelly has said "Capybaras are vital for the local ecosystem"

If you want to change the words within the quote, then please don't use quotation marks, say it in a passive voice instead.


Getting to your question though, you need not mention the name of the author of the quote unless it really is necessary - that is, if there are a heckload of other quotes that the examiner will have to read through to find what you have mentioned, or if it stands out for some reason. You know what I mean?

As obscene as it sounds, if you want good marks, you have to make your answer something the examiner would enjoy reading/find easy to read. That should be a goal of yours, as answers that make the examiner go through a big inconvenience would make the examiner annoyed and make them want to rob you of marks.

So do it if you think it would make the examiner's job easier.
Thanks for the advise.

In the magazine article, the author use some language like "a dark elf treads silently through the forest" to show a typical line from a fantasy book. Do you have any advise about how I should describe this? What literary technique does this use?
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RizK
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Advice, not advise. Advise is the verb.

I'm not very sure. Is it at the beginning of the article? It could be an epigraph. If it's in the middle of the document though, it could just be a quotation, not a literary device.

I'd highly suggest checking with a teacher though, as I'm not very sure about this. IIRC, iGCSE english doesn't go too heavily on knowledge of a vast number of literary devices, just a few main ones should be fine, if you know how to contextualise and explain them - I don't recall anything for quotation being in a list of those.

Check with your teacher.
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moon4
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(Original post by RizK)
Advice, not advise. Advise is the verb.

I'm not very sure. Is it at the beginning of the article? It could be an epigraph. If it's in the middle of the document though, it could just be a quotation, not a literary device.

I'd highly suggest checking with a teacher though, as I'm not very sure about this. IIRC, iGCSE english doesn't go too heavily on knowledge of a vast number of literary devices, just a few main ones should be fine, if you know how to contextualise and explain them - I don't recall anything for quotation being in a list of those.

Check with your teacher.
I've finished that assignment now, but for my next assignment I have to choose two articles of my choosing, and then answer two questions

"Examine the ways in which each writer uses language to convey the key ideas to the reader. You should refer to specific examples of language use to support the points you make. (15 marks)"

And

"Comment on how effective you found the articles overall. In your answer you should comment on: the content of the articles the use of language facts and opinions presented in the articles. Include a copy of the articles when you send your work to your tutor. () (10 marks)"

What type of two articles do you think would be easiest for me to make a good response to these two questions?
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RizK
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The first one is a factual answer. You would analyze the text, then notice what literary devices are used, what effect they have, then explain. This is probably easier if you have the experience in anthology.


The second one calls for your opinion. There is no right opinion, you decide how it was, then provide evidence to support your claim. Beginners might choose this, because the structure and key points for your answer are already given:

(Original post by moon4)
In your answer you should comment on: the content of the articles the use of language facts and opinions presented in the article
but it might be harder if you can't analyze the whole thing.. and it seems it has lower marks?
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