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    I agree with both sides. I found Spanish very hard at school because I hated the subject, I just had no interest in it, the same applied to History at the time so I found it hard.

    Now Iam quite interested in History and would find it easier as I would be more willing to learn about the subject.

    I find studying computing quite easy as I am interested in the sbubject so don't have to go out of my way that much to learn stuff however if I hated the subject I would find it really difficult. I still however find some aspects of computing quite hard even though I am interested in it. I am interested in Java but still find it hard for example.

    In t industry the people who are not really interested but are just doing it for the money probably soon reveal themselves as they won't have the passion.
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    Architecture isn't longer is it? You have to remember that medicine isn't simply 5 or 6 years. There's then a pre-reg year, and soon to be an additional foundation year. Exams then continue until consultant level (so mid 30's) Admitted training is then 'on the job'.
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    It doesn't say which degree would YOU find most difficult - the fact that we interpreted a pretty vague question differently is nothing to argue about (I only quoted your post because it was the first I saw that picked out medicine which I feel is pretty unique given it's established career prospects and the fact that 99% of entrants are absolutely committed to becoming Drs).

    Answering the question on the same basis as you were I'd say Architecture would give medicine a run for it's money - longer course, broader subject coverage (engineering/maths/graphic design/artistic flair) and the lack of a guaranteed reward at the end of it...not so hard to get onto either so it's possible to get onto the course even if you're not 100% sure you want to be an architect.
    The original question was not ambiguous in any way. It says "Which do you think is the hardest undergraduate degree in the UK?"

    A proper and well judged decision would use facts such as:

    1.) Difficulty of getting onto the course i.e.) Grades.
    2.) How long the course lasts
    3.) Difficulty of passing the degree i.e.) The deamnds of assessment.

    Why? Because:

    1.) It is an opinion that uses a wider range of sources to make the decision and hence is more likely to be a well informed decision.
    2.) It erdaictes personal feelings and bias to certain subjects that would blur the true reality in that; "such a subject is really the most difficult, even if I love it."
    3.) Facts are used.

    The question does not say, or imply: "Which degree would you find most difficult." Your answer was good if it replied to that question.
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    (Original post by joyabbott)
    Architecture isn't longer is it? You have to remember that medicine isn't simply 5 or 6 years. There's then a pre-reg year, and soon to be an additional foundation year. Exams then continue until consultant level (so mid 30's) Admitted training is then 'on the job'.
    Most careers have on-the-job training.
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    I have to admit to not knowing very much about architecture, but the BArch is 3 years isn't it, so I fail to see how this is longer than 5/6 years of vet/medschool/dentistry.
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    It's 7 yrs to get qualified - the course is only 3 I *think* followed by 4 yrs of virtually unpaid (if they're lucky they get £10k) on the job training....and then you have to find someone willing to employ a newly qualified architect - much harder industry to find work in than the staff starved NHS and the profession doesn't have a very good social status compared to Drs.

    Architecture as a profession has *really* suffered over the last 15 yrs or so - because of the safety implications they had to be strict with the maths/engineering knowledge which unfortunately meant quite a lot of architects qualifying without any talent at designing functional beautiful buildings at all...they're trying to rectify it now by having less strict entry requirements and more maths/engineering training during the course to bring people with good design skills up to the required level technical wise and hopefully counteract decades of mock tudar/brookside style estates of jelly mould houses and make our surroundings more beautiful and stimulating to live in.

    Such a mix of contradicting subjects/skills has to make it difficult to succeed in (especially given the crappy job prospects after all those yrs training)

    I'm so glad I'm studying Architecture in October now I've read that!
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    most medics wouldn't *dream* of doing any other subject....
    i flirted with law for quite a while. can certainly say i don't find medicine easy, even though i am now 100% committed towards being a doctor.
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    (Original post by Invisible)

    1.) Difficulty of getting onto the course i.e.) Grades.
    2.) How long the course lasts
    3.) Difficulty of passing the degree i.e.) The deamnds of assessment.

    [/b]
    i'd say your 3rd point is a good one, but the first two aren't as good really, becouse the difficulty of getting in isn't really linked with the difficulty of the course it just means its a very well subscribed course and they can afford to be picky about who they let in, in general electrical and electronic engineering has quite low entry grades due to the small amount of people wanting to do the course. and Medicine could be said to having high entry grades becouse they only want the best people dealing with operations, not becouse the course is hard (Which undoubtly is hard).

    and the second point is the length of the course just means theres a lot to learn not that its particulary hard. Like you'd not send a newly graduated doctor into an operating room and expect him to slice and dice the guy and cure his problems. takes training. but then so does engineering (Just using engineering as an example cos its something i know) An MEng takes 5 years to get, then you may have a 2 year training scheme after that, so thats 7 years, i never did a masters but it'll be 6 years total before i'll be fully trained.
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    (Original post by mjf)
    If you consider medicine to be difficult = think about veterinary medicine where you have to do all of that and in a number of different species!! I still wouldnt change it for the world! :P
    heehee, same here
    How 'difficult' something is does hugely depend on the individual person - for instance - I would find a degree in English sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ooooooooo hard!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    I'd say it depends totally on your ability. I'd find a degree in, say, art or music almost impossible because I'm just no good at it, whereas my subject (English) seems 'easier' to me because it's where my talent lies. It's all relative...
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    Everyone knows it's medicine
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    (Original post by tomhitchings)
    Everyone knows it's medicine
    obviously not or everyone would of voted for it
 
 
 
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