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    (Original post by Squishy)
    Yup, that's the one. I must admit I dismiss quantum mechanics quite readily, because it's just too unreal for me.
    You can't dismiss quantum mechanics. Without quantum mechanics you wouldn't have the ability to dismiss it .
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    You can't dismiss quantum mechanics. Without quantum mechanics you wouldn't have the ability to dismiss it .
    I'm not arguing with you about this. I know for a fact Schrödinger's cat is dead. I killed it because it was annoying me so much.
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    Plenty of people think that quantum mechanics is really mind boggling and hard. But there are lots of aspects of it. Some are quite simple to understand but will amaze you in their effects.
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    Plenty of people think that quantum mechanics is really mind boggling and hard. But there are lots of aspects of it. Some are quite simple to understand but will amaze you in their effects.
    Well, I was kind of joking...I can see where it's used, but I've never really liked it. One reason was because it was really badly introduced in my AS Physics course. The subject's a lot about the probability of something happening, but the way I was told in class, they did a literal interpretation that an electron actually follows every possible path simultaneously. Like I said, unreal.
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    Plenty of people think that quantum mechanics is really mind boggling and hard. But there are lots of aspects of it. Some are quite simple to understand but will amaze you in their effects.
    Both hard and boring.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    Well, I was kind of joking...I can see where it's used, but I've never really liked it. One reason was because it was really badly introduced in my AS Physics course. The subject's a lot about the probability of something happening, but the way I was told in class, they did a literal interpretation that an electron actually follows every possible path simultaneously. Like I said, unreal.
    How is something unreal if it actually happens?

    (Original post by Nylex)
    Both hard and boring.
    To each his own. I find it fascinating, like it or not, quantum mechanics is how the world works.
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    To each his own. I find it fascinating, like it or not, quantum mechanics is how the world works.
    What else do you like (Physics wise, cos I'm not a mathmo)? Electromagnetism I enjoy and classical mechanics.
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    I like Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetism (which ultimately evolves into the study of quantum field theory ), Condensed Matter physics (again quantum mechanics ), and Particle Physics.
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    I like Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetism (which ultimately evolves into the study of quantum field theory ), Condensed Matter physics (again quantum mechanics ), and Particle Physics.
    What the hell is quantum field theory? Quantised electric/magnetic fields? I'm an astro, so I like that stuff too (mmm, dark matter).
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    Basically yes. The electromagnetic field is quantised, as are all the force fields (well we are still making our minds up about gravity ).
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    Basically yes. The electromagnetic field is quantised, as are all the force fields (well we are still making our minds up about gravity ).
    Scary stuff. You physicists here are so smart damn it, my physics is crap!
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    How is something unreal if it actually happens?
    But that's just it...it doesn't happen. Or at least I don't believe so...while quantum mechanics may be a convenient model for describing things, it's not terribly useful if I actually want to know where something is. All I'm told is that "it's probably there".
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    Well that simply isn't the case. You will have to come to terms with the fact that things do not have a well defined location.

    You say it doesn't happen but over the past hundred years physicists have come to realise that it does happen.

    The double slit experiment is a good example, how can one electron interfere with itself? If it took all possible paths then it could .
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    (Original post by AntiMagicMan)
    The double slit experiment is a good example, how can one electron interfere with itself? If it took all possible paths then it could .
    Still don't like the indeterminism...but I accept the universe works in myseterious ways. By the way, do you know about Shahriar Afshar?
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    Yu think the double slit theory is weird.. search for the delayed-choice quantum eraser experiment

    The collapse of a wavefunction in the future can affect the interpretation of results in the past :cool:
 
 
 
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