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    I've heard that there's a 14-year old Chinese boy accepted into Oxford two years ago, doing Material Sciences at Corpus Christi - is that true? So he must be a 16/17-year old 3rd year student right now!

    Does Oxford still accept young students? Do you know any in your college?

    Just curious.
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    There are a few exceptions - but I know Jesus has a policy of as-a-rule not accepting students under 17, simply because they'd be unable to sign a lease in their second year for the college flats (not being 18). That said, I imagine most parents with a superstar genius child would rather seek accomodation in Oxford themselves than send the little genius to fend for themselves.
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    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    There are a few exceptions - but I know Jesus has a policy of as-a-rule not accepting students under 17, simply because they'd be unable to sign a lease in their second year for the college flats (not being 18). That said, I imagine most parents with a superstar genius child would rather seek accomodation in Oxford themselves than send the little genius to fend for themselves.
    As far as I know, *very* young students aren't even allowed to live in regular college accommodation, so they'd need to have a parent with them anyway. And I'm pretty sure that parent would also have to be present during tutorials for some sort of child-protection reason. That's one of the reasons why this sort of thing happens so rarely: it's a pain to organise.
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    I would think it's very rare. Even the child genius Ruth Lawrence (graduated from Oxford aged 13 with a starred first in maths in 1985, plus a special commendation from her college) didn't live in halls - the whole family decamped to Oxford and her father even gave up work to accompany her to lectures and tutorials, having home-schooled her up until that point. I'm not sure how healthy that last bit is, but it's understandable that she couldn't even live in college. I expect the logistics would have been nightmarish.

    If it were my child, I would rather let them pursue music/travel/art/drama/language classes/whatever they want in the intervening years before they're 18 in order to make them a more rounded individual, rather than shoving them through Oxbridge so that they graduate before they're 18.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    If it were my child, I would rather let them pursue music/travel/art/drama/language classes/whatever they want in the intervening years before they're 18 in order to make them a more rounded individual, rather than shoving them through Oxbridge so that they graduate before they're 18.
    Me too, but if studying higher maths is want they really wanted to do because it made them happy, and the only place they could do that was at university, I wouldn't stop them. I was desperate to go to university when I was 15 but my mother thought I was too young and prevented it - the two years I spent waiting until I was 17 were the most miserable of my life, but once I got there I loved it. I'm positive that going when I wanted to, at 15, would have done me more good than harm; but it's not for everyone. Many universities (in the UK) no longer accept young students - last year, I'm sure Oxford said something about not wanting to let under 17s in anymore, saying the 14-year-old Asain boy was potentially the last child undergrad.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    Me too, but if studying higher maths is want they really wanted to do because it made them happy, and the only place they could do that was at university, I wouldn't stop them. I was desperate to go to university when I was 15 but my mother thought I was too young and prevented it - the two years I spent waiting until I was 17 were the most miserable of my life, but once I got there I loved it. I'm positive that going when I wanted to, at 15, would have done me more good than harm; but it's not for everyone. Many universities (in the UK) no longer accept young students - last year, I'm sure Oxford said something about not wanting to let under 17s in anymore, saying the 14-year-old Asain boy was potentially the last child undergrad.
    As far as I know, they only said they were considering it, though, but they didn't actually decide on changing their current policy. At any rate, the admissions FAQ-page still contains the sentence "the University does not set any age requirements".
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    Do we have any links to any news articles on the 14-year-old Asian undergrad? I hadn't heard about it before now.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    I would think it's very rare. Even the child genius Ruth Lawrence (graduated from Oxford aged 13 with a starred first in maths in 1985, plus a special commendation from her college) didn't live in halls - the whole family decamped to Oxford and her father even gave up work to accompany her to lectures and tutorials, having home-schooled her up until that point. I'm not sure how healthy that last bit is, but it's understandable that she couldn't even live in college. I expect the logistics would have been nightmarish.

    If it were my child, I would rather let them pursue music/travel/art/drama/language classes/whatever they want in the intervening years before they're 18 in order to make them a more rounded individual, rather than shoving them through Oxbridge so that they graduate before they're 18.
    Ooh - my Mechanics teacher was at Oxford at the same time. She was apparently one of the most irritating people on Earth. She asked way too many questions in Lectures, and everyone apparently cheered when she got things wrong... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by henryt)
    Ooh - my Mechanics teacher was at Oxford at the same time. She was apparently one of the most irritating people on Earth. She asked way too many questions in Lectures, and everyone apparently cheered when she got things wrong... :rolleyes:
    There's a video of a TV interview she did with her father on the day she got her results on the BBC News website - she really is an obnoxious, unbearably conceited little ****. But how could she be otherwise, at 13, her only friend her father, and everyone telling her she is a genius (which maybe she is)? She's living a normal life now, anyway, though I think she lost contact with her father, and married someone who was his age and looked a lot like him.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    There's a video of a TV interview she did with her father on the day she got her results on the BBC News website - she really is an obnoxious, unbearably conceited little ****.
    I think I remember watching that interview a while ago. Is it the one in which she suddenly begins to discuss her political views with the interviewer? That was the point when I thought it got seriously ridiculous.:rolleyes:
    Then again, I suppose you're right: a 13-year-old put in such a situation couldn't possibly have come across as anything but an arrogant little brat...
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    Yes, she ended by going through the morning papers and telling the interviewer off for attempting to round up while she was still telling us her important views on Palestine and smoking in taxis. Of course, 'tobacco is a drug and drugs are illegal, so if you smoke you are breaking the law and must go to jail'. Yep. I can see now why she was so popular with her fellow students...

    But it's not her fault. I'm sure she cringes with embarrassment at the thought of it now.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    But it's not her fault. I'm sure she cringes with embarrassment at the thought of it now.
    Definitely. Doesn't everybody cringe at the thought of what they were like at that age, though? It's just that most people are lucky enough not to have gone on television during that time, so at least there's no archived footage of the cringeworthy moments of their lives...
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    at least there's no archived footage of the cringeworthy moments of their lives...
    YouTube ?

    Camera phones, camera phones
    more and more and more
    Oh what fun to be alive
    post-1984...

    DtS
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    There's a 16 year old mathmo at Mansfield whose going into the third year now but he's already covered all the third year material. He loved maths so much that he went to the second year lectures in his first year and all the third year lectures in his second year- absolute madness.
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    (Original post by Derek_the_Sheep)
    YouTube ?

    Camera phones, camera phones
    more and more and more
    Oh what fun to be alive
    post-1984...

    DtS
    None of those were around when I was 13, thank God.:p:
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    why would you need your parent to accompany you to lectures and tutes? I understand not living in college with the other students, but surely for tutorials etc it would be like school, no?
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    According to most admissions tutors, beginning this year, Oxford won't accept under 17's any more. Having just turned 17, I still struggled to find any college that would accept me ... finally Hertford gave in to my persistent nagging
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    (Original post by thomasjtl)
    why would you need your parent to accompany you to lectures and tutes? I understand not living in college with the other students, but surely for tutorials etc it would be like school, no?
    Yes, that's what I thought. Can't have been healthy for the girl at all and might go some way to explaining why she's now estranged from him
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    I know a girl who came to uni a year early and she coped *significantly* worse than the other students. It had nothing to do with her intelligence, she was just less mature than everyone else and had a hard time fitting in. (It wasn't that she came across as immature, you could just tell she had less life experience than some other people). I think there is an arugment for 17yr olds having to wait a year before coming to uni, especially one as intense as Oxford. I certainly wouldn't have wanted to go though it a year early
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    (Original post by mikeyT)
    There's a 16 year old mathmo at Mansfield whose going into the third year now but he's already covered all the third year material. He loved maths so much that he went to the second year lectures in his first year and all the third year lectures in his second year- absolute madness.
    Oooh, I heard about him - my ex-girlfriend's mum is his tutor and said ex-girlfriend was on a society's committee with him. Apparently his age did make stuff awkward, because of all the child protection issues surrounding under-18s...

    I know a couple of people who came to uni one year early, and so turned 18, rather than 19, during their first year. And I'd concur with Jenski - they did seem to find adapting to university life just that little bit harder. But taking a gap year isn't always practical - I believe tutors in subjects like Maths and Engineering discourage them - so I can understand why they started Oxford when they did.
 
 
 
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