Teachertolawyer
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Hi TSR!
A bit of background on myself.
I graduated in 2013 with a 2:2 LLB.
I had already decided part way through the course that I didn't want a career in law but wanted to finish the degree. After my degree I completed a PGCE and became a Primary School teacher.

I'm now looking at a career change and thought I may reconsider law, considering I do have a degree. I was just wondering what my chances of getting a job as a Legal Executive would be, were I to undertake a CILEX course?
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zoella14
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(Original post by Teachertolawyer)
Hi TSR!
A bit of background on myself.
I graduated in 2013 with a 2:2 LLB.
I had already decided part way through the course that I didn't want a career in law but wanted to finish the degree. After my degree I completed a PGCE and became a Primary School teacher.

I'm now looking at a career change and thought I may reconsider law, considering I do have a degree. I was just wondering what my chances of getting a job as a Legal Executive would be, were I to undertake a CILEX course?
Hi! I think it's great that you're considering CILEx - I have done the CILEx route myself and it's really fantastic and I love the career I've chosen. You're at a definite advantage having already done your degree, I never went to university so I studied the full course over 2 years whilst working full time as a paralegal in a law firm in Liverpool and it was quite tough doing all those exams after working long hours!

The graduate route is a lot less taxing on your time and you would be able to find a job relatively easily I expect as a trainee legal executive or a fee earner at a law firm whilst you study for the CILEx exams and you would then be in a good position to be promoted to legal executive within that firm or move on.

You need 3 years experience in the legal sector in order to apply for fellowship as a legal executive lawyer as well as your graduate CILEx exams. At least one of these years of experience has to be achieved after you finish your CILEx exams and become a graduate - but any previous legal experience you have before this would also be considered against the qualifying employment criteria.

The legal landscape has certainly changed over the past few years and more and more law firms are choosing candidates with the unconventional routes into law above or at least on par with the traditional law graduates. This is mainly because as legal executives generally have more hands on practical experience and usually stick to one area of law to specialise in whilst they're training. I am now employed as a legal executive lawyer at Clyde & Co in London and the whole thing took me 4 years to complete which includes the 2 years of studying and the 3 years of qualifying employment that you need to qualify. It's been hard work but definitely worth it!

I wish you the best of luck!
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notsit
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In addition to Zoella14's excellent information I would really recommend getting in touch with your local CILEx regional branch. They'll be able to give you advice and it will help you network and find a job for your qualifying employment. Please also check out CILEx's website for further information.
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Rosariri
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(Original post by zoella14)
Hi! I think it's great that you're considering CILEx - I have done the CILEx route myself and it's really fantastic and I love the career I've chosen. You're at a definite advantage having already done your degree, I never went to university so I studied the full course over 2 years whilst working full time as a paralegal in a law firm in Liverpool and it was quite tough doing all those exams after working long hours!

The graduate route is a lot less taxing on your time and you would be able to find a job relatively easily I expect as a trainee legal executive or a fee earner at a law firm whilst you study for the CILEx exams and you would then be in a good position to be promoted to legal executive within that firm or move on.

You need 3 years experience in the legal sector in order to apply for fellowship as a legal executive lawyer as well as your graduate CILEx exams. At least one of these years of experience has to be achieved after you finish your CILEx exams and become a graduate - but any previous legal experience you have before this would also be considered against the qualifying employment criteria.

The legal landscape has certainly changed over the past few years and more and more law firms are choosing candidates with the unconventional routes into law above or at least on par with the traditional law graduates. This is mainly because as legal executives generally have more hands on practical experience and usually stick to one area of law to specialise in whilst they're training. I am now employed as a legal executive lawyer at Clyde & Co in London and the whole thing took me 4 years to complete which includes the 2 years of studying and the 3 years of qualifying employment that you need to qualify. It's been hard work but definitely worth it!

I wish you the best of luck!
Hi Zoella. Thanks for the useful information! There's now a solicitor apprenticeship which is VERY competitive. So I might have to do CILEX as uni doesn't appeal to me. I'd like to specialise in criminal law. Can legal executives go to court? Also can they run their own firms?
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Rosariri
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(Original post by zoella14)
Hi! I think it's great that you're considering CILEx - I have done the CILEx route myself and it's really fantastic and I love the career I've chosen. You're at a definite advantage having already done your degree, I never went to university so I studied the full course over 2 years whilst working full time as a paralegal in a law firm in Liverpool and it was quite tough doing all those exams after working long hours!

The graduate route is a lot less taxing on your time and you would be able to find a job relatively easily I expect as a trainee legal executive or a fee earner at a law firm whilst you study for the CILEx exams and you would then be in a good position to be promoted to legal executive within that firm or move on.

You need 3 years experience in the legal sector in order to apply for fellowship as a legal executive lawyer as well as your graduate CILEx exams. At least one of these years of experience has to be achieved after you finish your CILEx exams and become a graduate - but any previous legal experience you have before this would also be considered against the qualifying employment criteria.

The legal landscape has certainly changed over the past few years and more and more law firms are choosing candidates with the unconventional routes into law above or at least on par with the traditional law graduates. This is mainly because as legal executives generally have more hands on practical experience and usually stick to one area of law to specialise in whilst they're training. I am now employed as a legal executive lawyer at Clyde & Co in London and the whole thing took me 4 years to complete which includes the 2 years of studying and the 3 years of qualifying employment that you need to qualify. It's been hard work but definitely worth it!

I wish you the best of luck!
Also I'm doing a levels right now so I could I start at level 6 diploma?
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Akub
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(Original post by zoella14)
Hi! I think it's great that you're considering CILEx - I have done the CILEx route myself and it's really fantastic and I love the career I've chosen. You're at a definite advantage having already done your degree, I never went to university so I studied the full course over 2 years whilst working full time as a paralegal in a law firm in Liverpool and it was quite tough doing all those exams after working long hours!

The graduate route is a lot less taxing on your time and you would be able to find a job relatively easily I expect as a trainee legal executive or a fee earner at a law firm whilst you study for the CILEx exams and you would then be in a good position to be promoted to legal executive within that firm or move on.

You need 3 years experience in the legal sector in order to apply for fellowship as a legal executive lawyer as well as your graduate CILEx exams. At least one of these years of experience has to be achieved after you finish your CILEx exams and become a graduate - but any previous legal experience you have before this would also be considered against the qualifying employment criteria.

The legal landscape has certainly changed over the past few years and more and more law firms are choosing candidates with the unconventional routes into law above or at least on par with the traditional law graduates. This is mainly because as legal executives generally have more hands on practical experience and usually stick to one area of law to specialise in whilst they're training. I am now employed as a legal executive lawyer at Clyde & Co in London and the whole thing took me 4 years to complete which includes the 2 years of studying and the 3 years of qualifying employment that you need to qualify. It's been hard work but definitely worth it!

I wish you the best of luck!
I just wanted to ask if I had bad a levels would effect my chance of becoming a legal executive
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zoella14
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(Original post by Akub)
I just wanted to ask if I had bad a levels would effect my chance of becoming a legal executive
Hi - no not necessarily. You can start at CILEx level 3 which I believe is set at A Level standard so you can do that via distance learning with CILEx law school or with independent colleges that offer CILEx but their entry requirements will differ from college to college.

Good luck!
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t_lovesbts
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(Original post by zoella14)
Hi! I think it's great that you're considering CILEx - I have done the CILEx route myself and it's really fantastic and I love the career I've chosen. You're at a definite advantage having already done your degree, I never went to university so I studied the full course over 2 years whilst working full time as a paralegal in a law firm in Liverpool and it was quite tough doing all those exams after working long hours!

The graduate route is a lot less taxing on your time and you would be able to find a job relatively easily I expect as a trainee legal executive or a fee earner at a law firm whilst you study for the CILEx exams and you would then be in a good position to be promoted to legal executive within that firm or move on.

You need 3 years experience in the legal sector in order to apply for fellowship as a legal executive lawyer as well as your graduate CILEx exams. At least one of these years of experience has to be achieved after you finish your CILEx exams and become a graduate - but any previous legal experience you have before this would also be considered against the qualifying employment criteria.

The legal landscape has certainly changed over the past few years and more and more law firms are choosing candidates with the unconventional routes into law above or at least on par with the traditional law graduates. This is mainly because as legal executives generally have more hands on practical experience and usually stick to one area of law to specialise in whilst they're training. I am now employed as a legal executive lawyer at Clyde & Co in London and the whole thing took me 4 years to complete which includes the 2 years of studying and the 3 years of qualifying employment that you need to qualify. It's been hard work but definitely worth it!

I wish you the best of luck!
Hi Zoella14. Useful information! I am in my 2nd year of cilex and I want to become a solicitor and gradually work my way up to a partner (as i believe people have done so through the cilex route). However since the law route is extremely competative, i was hoping to finish the cilex and then do a university degree - though some would say its a complete waste of time since i will already be qualified as an executive. Do you have advice as to what i should do?
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t_lovesbts
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(Original post by Akub)
I just wanted to ask if I had bad a levels would effect my chance of becoming a legal executive
I had bad a levels too but i got through to cilex. I just dont know what i can do further. Can you still go to uni after completing cilex??? (I dont even have a levels to get in!)
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Mysha7777
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I would strongly not recommed Cilex route to anyone out there
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Tas7710
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(Original post by Mysha7777)
I would strongly not recommed Cilex route to anyone out there
And why is that?
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