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    For the essay questions, how much detail do you need to know about events? Do you get higher marks for analysis than what you actually know?
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    (Original post by sammychu00)
    For the essay questions, how much detail do you need to know about events? Do you get higher marks for analysis than what you actually know?
    from my experience just describing an event really lowers your marks. You have to answer the questions with specific examples and dates and analysis how those dates are important in answering the question😄
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    (Original post by dom117117)
    from my experience just describing an event really lowers your marks. You have to answer the questions with specific examples and dates and analysis how those dates are important in answering the question😄
    Thanks for the quick reply!
    So would it better to simply state the event then describe how it cause whatever the question is referring to?
    Also what topics did you do? I'm doing the Stuarts & American in the 18th Century
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    (Original post by sammychu00)
    Thanks for the quick reply!
    So would it better to simply state the event then describe how it cause whatever the question is referring to?
    Also what topics did you do? I'm doing the Stuarts & American in the 18th Century
    welcome😄 I've been taught to set out 3 factor paragraphs that answer the question. Then within those 3 arguments I'll put in dates and events that support the argument. I wouldnt get hung up on the small detail of the events just explain how they relate to the Q and then analysis how convincing that argument is at the end😄
    I'm doing AQA Angervin kings and the Crusades.
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    You should never tell a story of an event. Its about names and dates and relevant information. but never ever the full details of an event. So, if you were to say, get a question on the Battle of Manzikert, and it was 'The Battle of Manzikert was the main reason why the Byzantine Empire was weak by 1095' (this question is so specific it would never happen but lets just roll with it)
    You wouldn't go into detail about what happened, about how Tachaniotes fled and how the Muslim soldiers used encirclement and had little daggers and arrows and wore little clothing which made them quick, about how Romanus Diogenes realised there was no one defending camp so went back and then Ducas said that he had died so everyone fled. They want to know about the dates, yes, and names, and historians quotes. But most questions should be focused on the effects or causes of something. Not the event itself and what it entails.
    Quote from the AQA mark scheme 'Answers will display a good understanding of the demands of the question.
    They will be well-organised and effectively communicated. There will be a range of clear and specific supporting information showing a good understanding of key features and issues, together with some conceptual awareness. The answer will be analytical in style with a range of direct comment leading to substantiated judgement.' - SPECIFIC INFORMATION! Not a lot of in depth rattling off about events, but precise, specific information. Analysis is more important than knowing the events through and through, but you need to know content.
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    (Original post by rosie.mn)
    You should never tell a story of an event. Its about names and dates and relevant information. but never ever the full details of an event. So, if you were to say, get a question on the Battle of Manzikert, and it was 'The Battle of Manzikert was the main reason why the Byzantine Empire was weak by 1095' (this question is so specific it would never happen but lets just roll with it)
    You wouldn't go into detail about what happened, about how Tachaniotes fled and how the Muslim soldiers used encirclement and had little daggers and arrows and wore little clothing which made them quick, about how Romanus Diogenes realised there was no one defending camp so went back and then Ducas said that he had died so everyone fled. They want to know about the dates, yes, and names, and historians quotes. But most questions should be focused on the effects or causes of something. Not the event itself and what it entails.
    Quote from the AQA mark scheme 'Answers will display a good understanding of the demands of the question.
    They will be well-organised and effectively communicated. There will be a range of clear and specific supporting information showing a good understanding of key features and issues, together with some conceptual awareness. The answer will be analytical in style with a range of direct comment leading to substantiated judgement.' - SPECIFIC INFORMATION! Not a lot of in depth rattling off about events, but precise, specific information. Analysis is more important than knowing the events through and through, but you need to know content.
    Thank you!
    Do you have a specific structure that you use for essay questions?
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    (Original post by sammychu00)
    Thank you!
    Do you have a specific structure that you use for essay questions?
    Yes I do! I will give you an example from one of my essays which was 21/25 (old AS spec question) which was an A. It was actually my first essay.
    ‘The weak position of the Byzantine Empire by 1095 was a consequence of internal dynastic rivalry.’ To what extent do you agree with this view?
    Intro: Whether it was weak or not. Here you need to question the question itself. State why you agree or disagree with what the question is actually proposing. Provide an outline for what you are going to discuss, a historians quote here would be nice. Try not to overdo the actual dates and stuff.
    Paragraph 1: Why internal dynastic rivalries were the main issue. In my essays, if I am arguing against the question, I start with the proposition and then the rest of the paragraphs can try to weaken the argument proposed to support my own. I say why I support the view in the question, and then counter-argue it.
    Paragraph 2: Here I discussed what else contributed,and gave a counter argument. First, I argue for, I use examples and show how they imply that this contributed to the weak position of the empire. Then, I give my alternate opinion, doing the same thing, and link it back to the question.
    I do this for another 3/4 paragraphs.
    For my last paragraph before the conclusion: This is where I enter the most significant reason, after successfully refuting all other possibilities. I still offer the counter argument though. So, I said that it was military issues that were the main reason but did state how they had eased over time.
    Conclusion: Here I state my argument again, referencing the question directly. Eg, 'To conclude, the weak position .... was not a consequence of internal dynastic rivalries because (good examples). It was however the military problems... (insert historian quote) say why it supports or doesn't support my conclusion.

    Hope this helped? (Sorry it was long)
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    (Original post by rosie.mn)
    Yes I do! I will give you an example from one of my essays which was 21/25 (old AS spec question) which was an A. It was actually my first essay.
    ‘The weak position of the Byzantine Empire by 1095 was a consequence of internal dynastic rivalry.’ To what extent do you agree with this view?
    Intro: Whether it was weak or not. Here you need to question the question itself. State why you agree or disagree with what the question is actually proposing. Provide an outline for what you are going to discuss, a historians quote here would be nice. Try not to overdo the actual dates and stuff.
    Paragraph 1: Why internal dynastic rivalries were the main issue. In my essays, if I am arguing against the question, I start with the proposition and then the rest of the paragraphs can try to weaken the argument proposed to support my own. I say why I support the view in the question, and then counter-argue it.
    Paragraph 2: Here I discussed what else contributed,and gave a counter argument. First, I argue for, I use examples and show how they imply that this contributed to the weak position of the empire. Then, I give my alternate opinion, doing the same thing, and link it back to the question.
    I do this for another 3/4 paragraphs.
    For my last paragraph before the conclusion: This is where I enter the most significant reason, after successfully refuting all other possibilities. I still offer the counter argument though. So, I said that it was military issues that were the main reason but did state how they had eased over time.
    Conclusion: Here I state my argument again, referencing the question directly. Eg, 'To conclude, the weak position .... was not a consequence of internal dynastic rivalries because (good examples). It was however the military problems... (insert historian quote) say why it supports or doesn't support my conclusion.

    Hope this helped? (Sorry it was long)
    That was really helpful, thank you! About how long are you paragraphs? I feel as though I always write too much about each point and end up wasting time making the same point over and over again
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    (Original post by sammychu00)
    That was really helpful, thank you! About how long are you paragraphs? I feel as though I always write too much about each point and end up wasting time making the same point over and over again
    I write a medium sized paragraph? Idk really. I try not to repeat myself. It's best to be concise rather than waffle!
 
 
 
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