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    If in an english biology textbook it says, "this part of the cell is called the cytoplasm", does it mean that part of the cell is called the cytoplasm in english and something different in other languages but you need to know the english name because science is written in english 99% of the time?

    Also, why don't they write, "this part of the cell is called the cytoplasm in english" and instead write, "this part of the cell is called the cytoplasm".
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    It is just the name in latin (for inside liquid of the cell or core, cannot remember) which is also used in other languages in biology. Just remember.
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    (Original post by Recont)
    It is just the name in latin (for inside liquid of the cell or core, cannot remember) which is also used in other languages in biology. Just remember.
    Cytoplasma is latin.

    Cytoplasm is english.

    I want to know why they don't write, "this part of the cell is called the cytoplasm in english" and instead write, "this part of the cell is called the cytoplasm".

    In spanish it is citoplasma, so why not include the "in english" bit?
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    Because biology.

    Dont question it, just accept it (if this is for GCSE/A level). Cytoplasm is the scientific name used by anyone regardless - you dont need to say 'in English'
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    (Original post by kiiten)
    Because biology.

    Dont question it, just accept it (if this is for GCSE/A level). Cytoplasm is the scientific name used by anyone regardless - you dont need to say 'in English'
    Why not? it's called citoplasma in spanish, zytoplasma in german. The scientific name is the latin name, which is cytoplasma.

    It's called cytoplasm in english.

    So why leave out the "in english" bit?
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    he's back again
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    (Original post by MrMimeMo)
    Why not? it's called citoplasma in spanish, zytoplasma in german. The scientific name is the latin name, which is cytoplasma.

    It's called cytoplasm in english.

    So why leave out the "in english" bit?
    Ah in that case, you should use the word based on your native language. E.g. if you live in the UK you use cytoplasm and you dont need to say 'in English' because people already recognise its the English spelling.

    I could be wrong but the only time you need to say is if you use the latin word (.... 'in Latin').
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    Was the fact that the textbook is in English unclear?!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Was the fact that the textbook is in English unclear?!
    So what does that mean?

    Why can't I say it's called citoplasma in spanish and cytoplasm in english?
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    (Original post by MrMimeMo)
    So what does that mean?

    Why can't I say it's called citoplasma in spanish and cytoplasm in english?
    Because is you are sitting the exam in England then you only need to answer in English. The text book is in English and is explaining what the scientific name is for that.

    I think you are overthinking it?
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    (Original post by bonbon99)
    Because is you are sitting the exam in England then you only need to answer in English. The text book is in English and is explaining what the scientific name is for that.

    I think you are overthinking it?
    The scientific name is cytoplasma, it is not telling us that, it is telling us the name in english. So why not write, "this is called cytoplasm in english".

    Technically it is called cytoplasm in english.
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    (Original post by MrMimeMo)
    So what does that mean?

    Why can't I say it's called citoplasma in spanish and cytoplasm in english?
    This is like correcting someone for saying "That's a tree" instead of "That's a tree in English, but un árbol in Spanish".

    Also, I would point out that "in English" is in English, while "en Inglés" is "in English" in Spanish, etc... We could be here all day...
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    (Original post by K-Man_PhysCheM)
    This is like correcting someone for saying "That's a tree" instead of "That's a tree in English, but un árbol in Spanish".

    Also, I would point out that "in English" is in English, while "en Inglés" is "in English" in Spanish, etc... We could be here all day...
    There is a difference between saying "that is a tree" and "that is called a tree", the second one needs specification to language.

    You can't just say, "this is called X" when there is more than one language in the world, unless there is an assumption on the part of the reader to assume when the authors writes, "this is called X", they mean "this is called X in english" unless otherwise specified.
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    (Original post by MrMimeMo)
    There is a difference between saying "that is a tree" and "that is called a tree", the second one needs specification to language.

    You can't just say, "this is called X" when there is more than one language in the world, unless there is an assumption on the part of the reader to assume when the authors writes, "this is called X", they mean "this is called X in english" unless otherwise specified.
    It seems quite alright to assume that when something is named, it is being named in that language and not others. Either way, why not write a letter to the authors to give your point of view?
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    (Original post by K-Man_PhysCheM)
    This is like correcting someone for saying "That's a tree" instead of "That's a tree in English, but un árbol in Spanish".

    Also, I would point out that "in English" is in English, while "en Inglés" is "in English" in Spanish, etc... We could be here all day...
    Exactly!

    (Original post by MrMimeMo)
    There is a difference between saying "that is a tree" and "that is called a tree", the second one needs specification to language.

    You can't just say, "this is called X" when there is more than one language in the world, unless there is an assumption on the part of the reader to assume when the authors writes, "this is called X", they mean "this is called X in english" unless otherwise specified.
    Youre overthinking it. Ok so with youre example - 'that is called a tree' you wouldnt need to add 'which is ........ in Spanish' because it's unnecessary information.
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    (Original post by K-Man_PhysCheM)
    It seems quite alright to assume that when something is named, it is being named in that language and not others. Either way, why not write a letter to the authors to give your point of view?
    Every author does it, it's a terrible assumption, people assume the english name I guess.

    Texts shouldn't have assumptions, but they clearly do. It is better to say, "we call this cytoplasm in english". There are no assumptions then.
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    (Original post by kiiten)
    Exactly!



    Youre overthinking it. Ok so with youre example - 'that is called a tree' you wouldnt need to add 'which is ........ in Spanish' because it's unnecessary information.
    You should write, "this is called a tree in english"

    Tell me, what is wrong with that sentence? I don't think anything.
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    Is it just me or is this clearly a troll?
 
 
 
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