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Can I do a Masters in Law after a year of GDL? watch

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    Hi, I was wondering whether it was possible to go on doing a Masters in Law after completng one year of GDL. I'm finishing a History degree at UCL this summer and like to go into International law. Is it possible to get a place for a Law Masters after a History BA and one year of GDL? Thanks!
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    PS Reviewer
    I don't know if it is the norm but I personally know someone who did the GDL and then started an LLM at the LSE after.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    I don't know if it is the norm but I personally know someone who did the GDL and then started an LLM at the LSE after.
    Hi, thanks so much for your answer.

    Do you know which GDL course your friend took (which Uni) and what his/her grades were? Also what did you friend do as an Undergrad degree.

    Sorry for bombarding you with questions, it's just really hard to find information on GDL and Masters
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    I believe she did a History degree, followed by the GDL at BPP. Although, the GDL is the same no matter which institution you study it at. Don't know her grades breakdowns, but she had a high 2:1 in her History degree.
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    Thanks! Yes everybody says that the institution does not matter but I can't see why people would go to BPP in London which is 4k more expensive than doing a GDL at Westminster University if it didn't matter at all, they can't all have a TC already, can they?
    I'm also doing History and a high 2:1 seems still in the realm of possibility and actually hoped to do a Master at LSE. I just have no experience in Law whatsoever, no interships or training schemes or anything of that sort. Do you think work experience is very vital for getting into a Masters programme? And if so how does one go about finding work/interships, coming from the outside?
    You've been so helpful already so please don't feel obliged to answer to all my questions, I can post them in a relevant forum and get some answers I'm sure!
    If you do feel like answering: Seeing from your profile you seem to be well knowledgable so could you maybe tell me if it is advisable/necessary to do a Masters after the GDL? I don't plan on working in the UK for all my life as I'm from the continent, so I need to go into a direction of Law that can be practiced globally or at least across Europe. I'm fluent in four languages, which I suppose could be of advantage in that field. Do you have any advice on how to go about that? Is a Masters necessary or will someone hire me without?
    Kind regards,
    Lea
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    Most people would suggest doing a two year PG LLB rather than the GDL and LLM.


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    • PS Reviewer
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    Agree with J-SP, every recruitment representative I've ever spoken to from law firms has told me that a Master's is not necessary at all. You're much better off trying to do a PG LLB.

    Some people choose BPP because it allegedly has better links with City law firms so more networking events and such to attend and a supposedly very helpful careers advice team.

    You might also want to consider that the GDL may not be acceptable as a law degree in other countries outside the UK. So if you do go down the GDL route, it may help you much more if you try to qualify as a solicitor/barrister in the UK and then look to move countries afterwards. I recommend researching the specific rules for foreign lawyers/foreign law degree holders to practise law locally in other countries to see if GDL-holders may face limitations or barriers in any of the other countries you're interested in.
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    Hi everyone.My daughter has just been offered a place to study history at KCL which is a great opportunity as she is a French English bilingual and the time in the UK would strengthen her English linguistic analytic and wittena nd oral communication skills. However she want to be an internaitonal lawyer and has a place to study law at Paris Descartes - which is the better choice and after studying history what would be the best route into law?Thank you for your advice
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    You posted this ages ago so your daughter has probably already started university and this is no longer helpful. If your daughter wants to be a top international lawyer, I would say the best route would be to take the BA in History at KCL, aim to do very well in it, and apply for vacation schemes at the top London law firms (Magic Circle, Silver Circle and US Firms). Her aim should be to secure a training contract by the time she graduates KCL, and then take the Common Professional Examinations required for admission by the Bar Council and the Law Society (currently usually delivered in the form of a Graduate Diploma in Law, GDL, but by the time your daughter graduates, due to changes by the SRA, it may be called something else SQE I II). Following the GDL and the LPC, kindly all paid for by the firm she has secured a training contract with, she will undergo two-years of high-quality and very well paid training at one of the most international law firms in the world (as the London commercial firms generally are). If she would prefer to be a barrister, she could complete mini-pupillage in her summers, and obtain scholarships from the Inns of Court for the GDL and the BPTC, and then take pupillage at a set of chambers in London. During her time at KCL, she could extend her study by one year by participating in the Erasmus programme and reading at another university in Europe, or one of KCL's partner universities around the world. Attending KCL would be better for her international career aspirations because she would be working on her language skills (assuming English is her second language) making her more marketable in the job place additionally legal work in London in more international in nature than in Paris. Most London firms have offices in Paris which she could go to on secondment during her training contract, as one of her seats. Indicating this is an intention of hers would also make her more desirable as a trainee for many firms. Studying Law at Descartes is very prestigious, rich and rewarding, but the French legal system is a Civil Law system, which is less commercially relevant that common law systems (the English system) which is commercial dominant. A qualified English lawyer can easily transfer to Ireland, Canada, Australia, India, NZ, and many other commonwealth countries. Additionally, studying English law is much more relevant to US law, than French law is (bar the state of Louisiana). So should she ever want to emigrate to the States and sit the NY or CAL Bar, which many international lawyers like to do, having a strong foundation in English law will be more helpful. English law is more exportable and a more popular governing law (for contracts, arbitration, transactions and other deals and dispute resolution) than French law is. Hope this helps!
 
 
 
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