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    I'm quite strongly considering studying a Masters in International Public Law at Leiden and I've a few questions that those with experience of Leiden might be able to help with.

    First up, how did you fund it? I'm probably going to save the money myself through working and I think I'll need up to £10k (does that sound right?)

    Second, I've read conflicting things about whether or not you can get a tuition fee loan from the Dutch government. Can you?

    Third, for housing did you go through the DUWO because that seems overpriced. If not, where did you find yourself a humble abode?

    Fourth, for those of you who study/studied at Leiden, how did you find it as a place?

    Finally, for those of you who study/studied the Public International Law Masters itself do you have any comments on the course itself, anything I might want to be aware of etc. Also where did you do your undergrad and what classification did you get (trying to gauge how hard it is to get in).

    Look forward to hearing from you all.

    PS - I'm in my final year in Law with Politics at Uni of Manchester, expecting a high 2:1, perhaps sneak a 1st.
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    I would like to compliment you on your choice for Leiden University. I have enjoyed living and studying at Leiden for the last 1.5 years
    Now, to aswer your questions. The cost of tuition for any EU students at Leiden is rougly €2K per year. Of course, books, rent and general living costs must be added, so I think that (depending on your rent) 10k pounds will be more than enough.
    This brings me to the second point: renting. The demand for student rooms in Leiden is extremely high at this moment. Even native students have problems with finding a suitible room. So I would recommend registering at DUWO as fast as possible (the longer you are registered, the bigger chance you have at finding a place) and looking at kamernet.nl. But be prepared to pay a large amount, for everyone will want that room.

    Now, to talk about Leiden itself. I really enjoy the place. Leiden is a pretty small town compared to other student cities. This makes for a great atmosphere while walking to the bigger and smaller streets in the centre. Because of the compactness of Leiden, it is really easy to go from one part of the town to another. Although a nightmare for cars, the streets do lend themselves perfectly for cycling.
    As the oldest city with a university in the Netherlands, Leiden has a wide cultural offer. The amount of museums in such a small city is almost ridiculous.
    I am not really the person that goes partying, but I do know that Leiden has a big number of bars where you are very able to enjoy yourself.
    I would also recomment joining the student association of your study.

    I hope you will enjoy studying at Leiden!
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    (Original post by PharmaScience)
    I would like to compliment you on your choice for Leiden University. I have enjoyed living and studying at Leiden for the last 1.5 years
    Now, to aswer your questions. The cost of tuition for any EU students at Leiden is rougly €2K per year. ...
    Hello! I’ve received an offer (BA Archaeology) from Leiden University, and I’m aspiring to participate some student associations there

    Besides those specifically for international students like AEGEE and ISN, do you have suggestions about other associations (in which lacking of Dutch language skills won’t be a major obstacle for active membership)? I also know German quite well, but haven’t taken any courses on Dutch…

    Particularly I’m interested in joining one of those Studentenverenigingen (Augustinus/Catena/Minerva/Quintus/SSR), but still know little beyond their basic structure and history despite I’ve done much research on this (with Google Translate). May I know that, could you summarise some major differences between them? Thanks!
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    (Original post by Iuris)
    Hello! I’ve received an offer (BA Archaeology) from Leiden University, and I’m aspiring to participate some student associations there

    Besides those specifically for international students like AEGEE and ISN, do you have suggestions about other associations (in which lacking of Dutch language skills won’t be a major obstacle for active membership)? I also know German quite well, but haven’t taken any courses on Dutch…

    Particularly I’m interested in joining one of those Studentenverenigingen (Augustinus/Catena/Minerva/Quintus/SSR), but still know little beyond their basic structure and history despite I’ve done much research on this (with Google Translate). May I know that, could you summarise some major differences between them? Thanks!
    If you are interested in joining an association (or fraternity, as they are called on the OWL website, though they are not only for male students) I would recommend joining the EL CID (enige Leidse centrale introductie dagen, or only Leiden central introduction days) introduction week. Although the program will be in Dutch, basically all of the students will be able to speak English and translate things for you. (http://english.elcidweek.nl/el-cid-week/, this is still the old EL CID wedsite, but you will find usefull info on it ).
    You could also join the OWL, or orientation week Leiden which is specifically for international students. The downside to this is that you will mostly meet only international students, and I do not know how the fraternities feature in the program.

    Now, to tell you something about the associations themself. Minerva is the oldest and biggest of them all, and has the image of very posh students. This is not entirely true, but just like most other old associations they do have a lot of traditions. You will like or hate it. Be prepared though to pay a large sum for membership. Minerva also focussus a lot on academics, for you are not allowed to join certain activities if your grades get below a certain point. They do however also offer tutors for certain studies.
    The second oldest and biggest is Augustinus. It is very compareble to Minerva, but a bit looser. As far as I'm aware, they do not have as much as a focus on academics.
    Quintus is one of the newer student associations, and started out as students from Minerva and Augustinus established a new association for the growing numbers of students. Although certain values have been copied from Minerva and Augustinus, Quintus is a lot more approachable. Like Minerva and Augustinus, they do have a distinct hierarchy and it is mandatory to join a so called Dispuut (in Augustinus they have cordialen, in Minerva Corpsen). Each dispuut has its own character. During the orientation week(s) after you join them, you can find out which one suits you.
    SSR is an association that started out as the first association for Reformed students. It has however, largely lost its religous values. SSR is one of the smaller asssociations of "The big five" and is also located in a smaller building (its also very narrow). Like Quintus, SSR has Disputen, but it is optional to join them, and you can decide at a later point to join one of them (some join them in the second year, as they have more time, some never join a dispuut).
    The last of the big Five is Catena. Catena is a bit of an odd one compared to the other disputes. A lot of the members are pretty quirky (in a good way though) and unique is a good description for Catena. One of the pros about Catena though, is that nothing is mandatory (apart from paying for membership, that is). You can go whenever you feel like, and if you do not have time you just don't go. Catena also has a bigger focus on hobbies, and you can join any of them to increase your skills in them (I do not know the specifics, though).The one rule Catena has, is to be yourself.

    It is good to know, that Minerva, Augustinus and Quitus have a so called 'ontgroening', or hazing. I do not know of any specifics of them, as members are not allowed to talk about them. Be prepared however to not get a lot of sleep during the hazing, though.
    SSR, instead of having a hazing, has a workweek. In this, you will need to do *****y voluntairy work like picking up trash in the park. You can however, also commute this (but it isn't really that bad compared to the hazings, I have been told)
    Catena only has an obtional introweekend, but this is just to do fun things and to get to know one another.

    Now this are only the five big associations. Leiden also has a lot of smaller ones, like religous ones and like Duivelsei, the one I am a member of. Duivelsei is a gaming association. On every "spelavond" (gaming evening) we play all kind of games with whoever wants to join in. It ranges from tabletop- , board, card and videogames. Although the announcements are in Dutch, the monthly mails are in both Dutch and English and most of our members speak English. Another pro is that the membership is very cheap compared to other associations (it was 35 euro this year) and like Catena, nothing is mandatory.

    For more information about the big five, go to http://students.leiden.edu/student-l...ent-clubs.html
    If you want more info about Duivelsei or other smaller associations, don't hesitate to contact me.
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    (Original post by PharmaScience)
    If you are interested in joining an association (or fraternity, as they are called on the OWL website, though they are not only for male students) I would recommend joining the EL CID (enige Leidse centrale introductie dagen, or only Leiden central introduction days) introduction week. Although the program will be in Dutch, basically all of the students will be able to speak English and translate things for you. (http://english.elcidweek.nl/el-cid-week/, this is still the old EL CID wedsite, but you will find usefull info on it ).
    You could also join the OWL, or orientation week Leiden which is specifically for international students. The downside to this is that you will mostly meet only international students, and I do not know how the fraternities feature in the program.

    Now, to tell you something about the associations themself. Minerva is the oldest and biggest of them all, and has the image of very posh students. This is not entirely true, but just like most other old associations they do have a lot of traditions. You will like or hate it. Be prepared though to pay a large sum for membership. Minerva also focussus a lot on academics, for you are not allowed to join certain activities if your grades get below a certain point. They do however also offer tutors for certain studies.
    The second oldest and biggest is Augustinus. It is very compareble to Minerva, but a bit looser. As far as I'm aware, they do not have as much as a focus on academics.
    Quintus is one of the newer student associations, and started out as students from Minerva and Augustinus established a new association for the growing numbers of students. Although certain values have been copied from Minerva and Augustinus, Quintus is a lot more approachable. Like Minerva and Augustinus, they do have a distinct hierarchy and it is mandatory to join a so called Dispuut (in Augustinus they have cordialen, in Minerva Corpsen). Each dispuut has its own character. During the orientation week(s) after you join them, you can find out which one suits you.
    SSR is an association that started out as the first association for Reformed students. It has however, largely lost its religous values. SSR is one of the smaller asssociations of "The big five" and is also located in a smaller building (its also very narrow). Like Quintus, SSR has Disputen, but it is optional to join them, and you can decide at a later point to join one of them (some join them in the second year, as they have more time, some never join a dispuut).
    The last of the big Five is Catena. Catena is a bit of an odd one compared to the other disputes. A lot of the members are pretty quirky (in a good way though) and unique is a good description for Catena. One of the pros about Catena though, is that nothing is mandatory (apart from paying for membership, that is). You can go whenever you feel like, and if you do not have time you just don't go. Catena also has a bigger focus on hobbies, and you can join any of them to increase your skills in them (I do not know the specifics, though).The one rule Catena has, is to be yourself.

    It is good to know, that Minerva, Augustinus and Quitus have a so called 'ontgroening', or hazing. I do not know of any specifics of them, as members are not allowed to talk about them. Be prepared however to not get a lot of sleep during the hazing, though.
    SSR, instead of having a hazing, has a workweek. In this, you will need to do *****y voluntairy work like picking up trash in the park. You can however, also commute this (but it isn't really that bad compared to the hazings, I have been told)
    Catena only has an obtional introweekend, but this is just to do fun things and to get to know one another.

    Now this are only the five big associations. Leiden also has a lot of smaller ones, like religous ones and like Duivelsei, the one I am a member of. Duivelsei is a gaming association. On every "spelavond" (gaming evening) we play all kind of games with whoever wants to join in. It ranges from tabletop- , board, card and videogames. Although the announcements are in Dutch, the monthly mails are in both Dutch and English and most of our members speak English. Another pro is that the membership is very cheap compared to other associations (it was 35 euro this year) and like Catena, nothing is mandatory.

    For more information about the big five, go to http://students.leiden.edu/student-l...ent-clubs.html
    If you want more info about Duivelsei or other smaller associations, don't hesitate to contact me.
    Thanks for your kind reply! I’ve done some reflection today, and reminded I have an aspiration besides my study: promoting Leiden University among international students (potential applicants) – not only because it’s really an excellent choice for studying abroad, but also that could boost Leiden’s internationalisation and competitiveness on the world stage.

    Thus I’m looking for groups or associations which could provide platforms to realise that goal. Seemingly it’s not among the missions of AEGEE, ISN, and Leiden United, and currently I’m wondering about SIB Leiden (DUNSA)…

    Perhaps that plan could be realised in my major’s study association (Leidsche Archeologische Studievereniging)? Or could I also put my suggestions forward during LUS (Leids Universitair Studentenplatform) meetings and breakfast clubs?

    I’ve read through articles about student co-participation on Leiden’s website, but still know little about how (and whether) this works in real life.
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    (Original post by Iuris)
    Thanks for your kind reply! I’ve done some reflection today, and reminded I have an aspiration besides my study: promoting Leiden University among international students (potential applicants) – not only because it’s really an excellent choice for studying abroad, but also that could boost Leiden’s internationalisation and competitiveness on the world stage.

    Thus I’m looking for groups or associations which could provide platforms to realise that goal. Seemingly it’s not among the missions of AEGEE, ISN, and Leiden United, and currently I’m wondering about SIB Leiden (DUNSA)…

    Perhaps that plan could be realised in my major’s study association (Leidsche Archeologische Studievereniging)? Or could I also put my suggestions forward during LUS (Leids Universitair Studentenplatform) meetings and breakfast clubs?

    I’ve read through articles about student co-participation on Leiden’s website, but still know little about how (and whether) this works in real life.
    I would deffinatly recommend joining the OWL then. Since this week is specifically for international students, they will most likely be able to help you futher with these ambitions. Since I do not study Archeology, I would not know what role they could play for you. My bachelor study is in Dutch, so internationalisation is not really important (as in: international students can't study it if they don't speak Dutch).
    I also would not hesitate to send an email to the organisations you are interested in joining. They will be able to give you the more specific information.
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    (Original post by PharmaScience)
    I would deffinatly recommend joining the OWL then. Since this week is specifically for international students, they will most likely be able to help you futher with these ambitions. Since I do not study Archeology, I would not know what role they could play for you. My bachelor study is in Dutch, so internationalisation is not really important (as in: international students can't study it if they don't speak Dutch).
    I also would not hesitate to send an email to the organisations you are interested in joining. They will be able to give you the more specific information.
    It’s completely ok if you don’t know or refuse to answer those questions. However, I’d like to remind you that, you’re not in a position to judge me of having not send emails to those organisations, and in no way you could impose that doctrine – there’s no need to double check official statements with outsiders’ comments – to others.

    By the way, you can well think internationalisation doesn’t matter to you, and hopefully you could done an excellent job by never reading English academic literature, never attending international conferences, never collaborating with foreign researchers, and never bothering to study abroad.
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    (Original post by Iuris)
    It’s completely ok if you don’t know or refuse to answer those questions. However, I’d like to remind you that, you’re not in a position to judge me of having not send emails to those organisations, and in no way you could impose that doctrine – there’s no need to double check official statements with outsiders’ comments – to others.

    By the way, you can well think internationalisation doesn’t matter to you, and hopefully you could done an excellent job by never reading English academic literature, never attending international conferences, never collaborating with foreign researchers, and never bothering to study abroad.
    Uhmm, I'm sorry to put it like this, but how the hell did you come to this conclusion? I only said that you could send them an email because this is very common around here and they are more likely to give you a better answer than I am. It was just a tip, trying to help you.

    And the internationalisation part was about my student association "Aesculapius". They do not put any effort in appealing to international students because the lectures are given in Dutch. Personnaly, I think internationalisation is very importent, thus the reason why I am on this forum. In fact, I came here to search more info about studying abroad (I like to do my minor abroad).
    So there is absolutely no need to tell me off, I was just trying to help you.
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    (Original post by PharmaScience)
    Uhmm, I'm sorry to put it like this, but how the hell did you come to this conclusion? I only said that you could send them an email because this is very common around here and they are more likely to give you a better answer than I am. It was just a tip, trying to help you.

    And the internationalisation part was about my student association "Aesculapius". They do not put any effort in appealing to international students because the lectures are given in Dutch. Personnaly, I think internationalisation is very importent, thus the reason why I am on this forum. In fact, I came here to search more info about studying abroad (I like to do my minor abroad).
    So there is absolutely no need to tell me off, I was just trying to help you.
    Then I think our opinions aren’t necessarily in conflict – you stressed the need to directly ask those organisations and I stressed the need to double check with outsiders’ opinions.

    And thanks again for your previous suggestions
 
 
 
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