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    So as a lot of people may know, you can qualify as a lawyer/solicitor without going to uni and traditional training. Instead nab an apprenticeship /work your way up (putting it lightly!) that would take you approx six years and you qualify as a solicitor etc etc
    Ive come to learn about all the benefits about taking the apprenticeships route so i was just wondering, what are the benefits of taking the traditional uni route to become a solicitor?
    Aside from things such as the "uni experience" or like being able to say youre a honorary graduate/alumnus of XXX Uni
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    (Original post by puglife09)
    So as a lot of people may know, you can qualify as a lawyer/solicitor without going to uni and traditional training. Instead nab an apprenticeship /work your way up (putting it lightly!) that would take you approx six years and you qualify as a solicitor etc etc
    Ive come to learn about all the benefits about taking the apprenticeships route so i was just wondering, what are the benefits of taking the traditional uni route to become a solicitor?
    Aside from things such as the "uni experience" or like being able to say youre a honorary graduate/alumnus of XXX Uni
    You won't work as hard. Juggling a full time job and study is hard. Studying full time is a breeze in comparison. And it will give you time to do things you enjoy, while a full time job + studying won't as much.

    I'm all for apprenticeships having recruited them in other sectors. However, they are not for everyone. For those who have never had a part-time job, I don't recommend them - it can be a brutal introduction to the world of work. There are fair amounts of people who leave apprenticeships because either they don't like it or because they fail their apprenticeship assessments/fail to meet standards in their work. Law firms tend to be brutal anyway, with high expectations, so I think this is probably amplified compared to other sectors.

    I guess it depends how much you value the first four years, and also how mature you are. If you lack maturity, uni gives you the time to develop it.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    You won't work as hard. Juggling a full time job and study is hard. Studying full time is a breeze in comparison. And it will give you time to do things you enjoy, while a full time job + studying won't as much.

    I'm all for apprenticeships having recruited them in other sectors. However, they are not for everyone. For those who have never had a part-time job, I don't recommend them - it can be a brutal introduction to the world of work. There are fair amounts of people who leave apprenticeships because either they don't like it or because they fail their apprenticeship assessments/fail to meet standards in their work. Law firms tend to be brutal anyway, with high expectations, so I think this is probably amplified compared to other sectors.

    I guess it depends how much you value the first four years, and also how mature you are. If you lack maturity, uni gives you the time to develop it.


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    Thank you for your reply. Yeah,I was thinking of getting a summer job after i finish up my GCSEs this year since some friends that were in yr 11 last year found their summer boring with not much to do and they regret not being productive. I was thinking a job in retail/customer service; and during my college years i would gain some admin work experience and try to get experience within a law firm to see what im "dealing with". do u think tjis is a good idea?
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    (Original post by puglife09)
    Thank you for your reply. Yeah,I was thinking of getting a summer job after i finish up my GCSEs this year since some friends that were in yr 11 last year found their summer boring with not much to do and they regret not being productive. I was thinking a job in retail/customer service; and during my college years i would gain some admin work experience and try to get experience within a law firm to see what im "dealing with". do u think tjis is a good idea?
    I'd try to get more office experience than retail. If you have never worked in an office environment, it can be a steep learning curve. Even doing some informal work shadowing in a law firm would probably be a good idea before going into it full time.


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