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    I have a question:

    Self-plagiarism.

    Universities have this rule that you can't self-plagiarise - re-present the same piece (or part of) for multiple assignments. Some instititions go so far as to label it deceit.

    Fair enough.

    So why then is it ok to for faculty members to revise editions of their texts, usually with only fairly marginal changes, year on year? Not just for publication, but also for financial gain? If you go from 6th to 7th edition of any given text, there's no way it would pass turnitin.

    A student cannot reproduce part of his/her own work in an assignment in the course of study.

    However, the lecturer can require that students buy academic texts that are almost identical to a previous ones.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    I have a question:

    Self-plagiarism.

    Universities have this rule that you can't self-plagiarise - re-present the same piece (or part of) for multiple assignments. Some instititions go so far as to label it deceit.

    Fair enough.

    So why then is it ok to for faculty members to revise editions of their texts, usually with only fairly marginal changes, year on year? Not just for publication, but also for financial gain? If you go from 6th to 7th edition of any given text, there's no way it would pass turnitin.

    A student cannot reproduce part of his/her own work in an assignment in the course of study.

    However, the lecturer can require that students buy academic texts that are almost identical to a previous ones.
    First of all, academics are bound by the same rules in similar situations. An academic could not get credit for the same research on multiple occasions in the Research Effectiveness Framework or in internal promotion assessments.

    Updating textbooks for publishing is not the same as producing new research.

    Secondly all knowledge isn't equal. In some subjects, law and economics, for instance there is a tradition of teaching and examining on the new and fashionable. Both academics and students are guilty of this. As a result textbooks have to be bang up to date.
    In history topics go in and out of fashion


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    Hi another factor that is brought in time and again is that, as a general fact of life, however unfair it seems, rules are usually laid down by people in authority - therefore, unjust as it may be, people lower down the hierarchy of power are forced to play a submissive role - a good analogy is the extremely strict and apparently bully-like manner in which the hmrc treats businesses; this attitude stems out of a minority of dishonest tax-dodgers (usually themselves large organizations, several of which have been in the news in recent years), which make the hmrc generalize and treat every individual, even the conscientiously law-abiding ones, as if they were crininals.

    In our context, the powers-to-be, who define what is considered to be plagiarism, are, ultimately, past or present educators - if any student was seen as challenging these tenets, his/her degree would probably suffer; unfortunately, as some put it, it's a real world!
 
 
 
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