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    I'm currently in 4th year and having spend most of my University life not really bothered about intercalating, I then saw one for Emergency Medicine (which i have a great interest in). I am now very torn on what to do due to a few reasons and it's making me a bit anxious.

    Does intercalating have a big impact on your future career? particularly if you want to do acute medicine? I'm still not 100% sure what exactly I want to do in the end but I did enjoy my A&E placement.
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    (Original post by Medstudent2013)
    I'm currently in 4th year and having spend most of my University life not really bothered about intercalating, I then saw one for Emergency Medicine (which i have a great interest in). I am now very torn on what to do due to a few reasons and it's making me a bit anxious.

    Does intercalating have a big impact on your future career? particularly if you want to do acute medicine? I'm still not 100% sure what exactly I want to do in the end but I did enjoy my A&E placement.
    1) Interest is one of the best indications that an iBSc is for you.

    2) Depends on what you do, how well you do, what you want to do and where you want to do it. I'm sorry that's not more helpful, however, there are a great deal of variables. In short, no. It can be helpful, but, is in no way a requirement.

    3) For almost every sub-speciality of acute medicine they will take your arm off just for your interest. It is a speciality, as i'm sure you know, that isn't going anywhere and is heavily understaffed.

    In general, some things to consider:

    - Is there something you are interested in?
    - Are you alright with being in the cohort below?
    - Are you alright with losing a year? (in the grand scheme of things a year mean very little, however, seeing your friends with jobs and lives (this is very variable) is depressing)
    - Are you alright with the loss of money? i.e. a years loss of earnings + the living costs of an extra year...your tuition is obviously free
    - Same uni or different uni? Where would you live? Where will you live when you get back?

    I loved my BSc (apart from all the Western Blotting) however, there are some who don't or regret it and my BSc was very, very different from an Emergency Medicine one. It's a personal decision, however, I think if you get the opportunity it's one that isn't gonna come by as neat and tidy and all packaged up in a year long course ever again. Also you get to step out of Medicine which is lovely.
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    (Original post by Medstudent2013)
    Does intercalating have a big impact on your future career? particularly if you want to do acute medicine?.
    It gives a not insignificant number of points for both FY1 applications and CT/ST applications. It might look good if you apply to EM too.

    But its a big commitment so not a light decision. I guess it depends: do you think of this extra year as a) another year of not earning money, holding you back from being a doctor or b) a chance to keep having fun at uni and put off the real world for a year!

    The latter paragraph is probably more important than the former.
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    Hi, just to say a few words, in case my experience throws some light into your dilemma - I was offered an iBSc in Biochemistry, I suppose because it was one of the few subjects I had excelled in at BMS (Basic Medical Sciences was the name given to first two years at Guys (now Kings) in those days) - On balance, I decided not to take it up, considered doing a iBSc in pharmacology instead, but eventually also decided against that.

    I enjoyed my clinical years, but although I passed final medicine exam, gave up medicine later for personal reasons, and did a pharmacology degree in two years (instead of the one year I could have done it in) and a few other degrees later.

    Although I branched out into the pharmaceutical industry and now lecture to doctors, optoms and pharmacists, and train doctors on medical software (which you more likely than not will not end up doing!), on hindsight, I should perhaps have taken an intercalated degree, perhaps even a BA (as they used to make compulsory at Cambridge some years ago); I think a year in something completely different from clinical medicine gives you not only a break from medical studentship, but also a broader outlook to life, and as mentioned by nexttime above, a chance to have some fun before being tied up into the grind of a medical career.

    If I were in your shoes, I would make a compromise and do a BSc, not in A & E, but something that would help your career in A & E, or your second choice of specialty, just in case you decide to change - after all you must have heard the well-known idiom in clinical medicine: "always keep an open mind!" - just like you need to ask a patient with recurrent pyrexia (who you think might "just" have flu or a UTI) whether they have been abroad recently (however unlikely malaria or TB may seem initially), in the same vein, a med student profoundly interested in cardiology (myself) might end up a clinical pharmacologist (which I did)!

    So, maybe an iBSc in cardiac physiology or in obs and gynae (it is not unheard of to have a woman being rushed into A & E with the "head popping out" so to speak!!

    Good luck!
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    Which medical school offers an intercalated BSc in Emergency Medicine?

    You really don't need an intercalated BSc to pursue a career in emergency medicine or acute medicine. Those specialties are likely to bite your hand off regardless of what CV "extras" you bring to the table. That said, a BSc might be an opportunity to test whether or not emergency medicine is something you want to pursue long-term. A year invested now is a small price to pay for making sure you spend the next few decades doing something you enjoy.

    An extra year in emergency medicine would also be relevant to any other specialty you end up pursuing as having an approach to "chest pain", "shortness of breath", "hyponatraemia", etc will be useful whatever you do.
 
 
 
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