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Aspiring medic... Would getting help for mental health issues jeopardise my future? Watch

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    Currently at university doing a different degree. Often feel down and have frequent mood swings. I'm quite level-headed so I never get extremely happy or anything. But when I'm happy, I'm happy and when I'm sad, I'm sad.

    So should I get help?
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    usycool1 Would be an awesome person to give you some advice on this
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Currently at university doing a different degree. Often feel down and have frequent mood swings. I'm quite level-headed so I never get extremely happy or anything. But when I'm happy, I'm happy and when I'm sad, I'm sad.

    So should I get help?
    Hi there

    I'd say that regardless of what your future plans are, you should get help for any mental health problems that you've noticed are affecting your ability to function. Speaking to your GP is the best bet.

    My understanding is that mental health is being taken far more seriously in medicine now, especially with the high rates of burnout etc. Making sure that you are getting the right support early is so important. I wouldn't say it jeopardises your future, but you just have to be confident in yourself that you can cope with the demands of the course, and ultimately the job.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Currently at university doing a different degree. Often feel down and have frequent mood swings. I'm quite level-headed so I never get extremely happy or anything. But when I'm happy, I'm happy and when I'm sad, I'm sad.

    So should I get help?
    Hey.

    I'm not sure if this is a diagnosed mental health condition you're talking about here but presuming it is, it shouldn't stop you from pursuing medicine provided you do get help for it and disclose it. You won't be asked to leave medicine purely on the basis that you have a mental health issue, unless it is so severe that they deem that issue to put either you or patients at risk (but that's extremely rare, and is true also for physical health issues ). The important thing is that you do disclose it to your medical school and show them that you're trying to get help for it - getting help for it will be seen as a good thing and absolutely not as a bad thing. If you do that, there should be absolutely no issue at all.

    Good luck!
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    http://www.gmc-uk.org/information_for_you/23499.asp
    http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/undergraduate/23289.asp
    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4273608

    Some links I know about that would help
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    Hey.

    I'm not sure if this is a diagnosed mental health condition you're talking about here but presuming it is, it shouldn't stop you from pursuing medicine provided you do get help for it and disclose it. You won't be asked to leave medicine purely on the basis that you have a mental health issue, unless it is so severe that they deem that issue to put either you or patients at risk (but that's extremely rare, and is true also for physical health issues ). The important thing is that you do disclose it to your medical school and show them that you're trying to get help for it - getting help for it will be seen as a good thing and absolutely not as a bad thing. If you do that, there should be absolutely no issue at all.

    Good luck!
    I haven't been diagnosed which is why I'm wondering if I should.

    I'm generally pretty happy and no one would even begin to think I feel so down sometimes. I refrain from using the word depression because I'm not sure if that's what I have. I have no doubt felt suicidal in the past though and for very trivial reasons like 'oh my SO didn't reply to me -> they don't love me -> I'm not needed -> I should die' - it escalates pretty quickly. I have probably felt suicidal since I was 10 or so but did not realise that's what I was feeling.

    Also I'm not doing a medical degree yet, but if I apply would I have to disclose it if I were to get diagnosed?

    Thank you for the links. I will have a look when I get a minute between coursework and revision!

    (Original post by *Dreamer*)
    Hi there

    I'd say that regardless of what your future plans are, you should get help for any mental health problems that you've noticed are affecting your ability to function. Speaking to your GP is the best bet.

    My understanding is that mental health is being taken far more seriously in medicine now, especially with the high rates of burnout etc. Making sure that you are getting the right support early is so important. I wouldn't say it jeopardises your future, but you just have to be confident in yourself that you can cope with the demands of the course, and ultimately the job.
    I see where you're coming from. It would show that I am doing something about it. Thanks
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't been diagnosed which is why I'm wondering if I should.

    I'm generally pretty happy and no one would even begin to think I feel so down sometimes. I refrain from using the word depression because I'm not sure if that's what I have. I have no doubt felt suicidal in the past though and for very trivial reasons like 'oh my SO didn't reply to me -> they don't love me -> I'm not needed -> I should die' - it escalates pretty quickly. I have probably felt suicidal since I was 10 or so but did not realise that's what I was feeling.

    Also I'm not doing a medical degree yet, but if I apply would I have to disclose it if I were to get diagnosed?



    Thank you for the links. I will have a look when I get a minute between coursework and revision!



    I see where you're coming from. It would show that I am doing something about it. Thanks
    Hey I just want to say that I understand what you're going through as you've been going through this since you were 10 - I have too. I have PDD (and in the past PDD + Severe Depression), so I can probably relate to you on the point of not realising what you're feeling - when you go through it for so long, you accept it as your 'normal state' and that's it's a part of you so you don't think about it too much.

    The links explain whether or not you should disclose etc etc.

    Getting diagnosed means going to a psychiatrist - they're the ones who diagnose you. Going to a counsellor or therapist could simply help and they aren't diagnosticians (from my knowledge - sorry if im wrong) but can help you. I believe however that depending on where you get your care they make work together with pychiatrists and have you diagnosed through a referral. But to have therapy/see a counsellor, you don't need a diagnosis.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't been diagnosed which is why I'm wondering if I should.

    I'm generally pretty happy and no one would even begin to think I feel so down sometimes. I refrain from using the word depression because I'm not sure if that's what I have. I have no doubt felt suicidal in the past though and for very trivial reasons like 'oh my SO didn't reply to me -> they don't love me -> I'm not needed -> I should die' - it escalates pretty quickly. I have probably felt suicidal since I was 10 or so but did not realise that's what I was feeling.

    Also I'm not doing a medical degree yet, but if I apply would I have to disclose it if I were to get diagnosed?
    I'm sorry that you have felt suicidal in the past. It must have been really tough for you, and I hope you're doing a bit better now at least.

    In terms of getting diagnosed, do seek help if you feel like you need it. You will have to declare it to your medical school - it's in the GMC guidelines (see here: http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Publicat...h-Guidance.pdf). It's more so that they can support you rather than for them to punish you, however. If it's any reassurance, my medical school hasn't given me any grief when I told them about things and mine was in the 'severe' category of the link I've provided above. It was the opposite in fact, and I'm very glad they know.

    (Original post by caseynh)
    H
    Getting diagnosed means going to a psychiatrist - they're the ones who diagnose you.
    Or GP.
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    I'm sorry that you have felt suicidal in the past. It must have been really tough for you, and I hope you're doing a bit better now at least.

    In terms of getting diagnosed, do seek help if you feel like you need it. You will have to declare it to your medical school - it's in the GMC guidelines (see here: http://www.medschools.ac.uk/Publicat...h-Guidance.pdf). It's more so that they can support you rather than for them to punish you, however. If it's any reassurance, my medical school hasn't given me any grief when I told them about things and mine was in the 'severe' category of the link I've provided above. It was the opposite in fact, and I'm very glad they know.



    Or GP.
    You're right - I forgot that we're talking about someone over 18, because in my knowledge for under 18s a psychiatrist is needed. Sorry about that, ignore what I said
 
 
 
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