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    Helloooo,

    I am currently a year 12 student studying biology, chemistry and economics, and I have absolutely no clue what I want to do at uni. When I started college I wasn't even sure what A-levels I wanted to do, I changed about a million times and even now I'm not really happy with them, but that's only because I'm struggling with the workload which is my own personal problem, and because my college is 3 bus rides away from me which wears me thin every day! But the other day I was talking to my friend about how tough college has been and we were having a really funny conversation laughing about failing until I was like, 'I don't even know what I wanna do at uni hahaha!!' and my friend was like wow that's pretty bad like even I know what I want to do, which kinda shocked me because I really do wanna go to university, but I don't know what exactly I want to do. I don't really think about university, which may be part of my problem, but that's because I didn't get perfect GCSE's and I'm worried that wont even get me in. I want something that'll get me a good job if I'm honest because at the end of the day that's what I really want. I did want to do like forensics but people have told me that its a dumb course that won't even get me a job anywhere which put me off. (This another reason why I don't know what I want to do, because whenever I have a sort of idea, people always tell me that I won't get a good job from it...)
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    You don't have to go to uni straight after college. There's nothing to stop you working for a few years and getting a better idea of what you want to do.

    Don't go to uni because you feel you have to.
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    If you don't have a clear idea then don't go. Simple as that. Don't waste your time and money on a course that you aren't emotionally invested in.

    Take a year (or more) out to try some things and see where you want to go and what you want to do. There's no reason to decide now.

    It's not at all bad that you don't know what you want to do at uni. You're expected to, at 18 or younger, make a decision that could shape the rest of your life. If anything most people don't give it enough thought.

    What's wrong with forensics? I'm personally studying digital forensics (the computer version of what you want to do I guess) and I enjoy it. University and a degree won't just open a job nowadays. It never really has. To get a job you still need to put the work in, search around and apply. Ignore anyone saying that it's a dumb course, it's a perfectly legitimate course. If you wanted to go into police forensics or something similar you'll need to get experiene at some point. Might as well start with a degree.

    Don't at all feel rushed and don't let other people decide for you. Do whatever you want. Do what makes you happy. Don't make any decisions until you know what that is
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    You don't have to go to uni straight after college. There's nothing to stop you working for a few years and getting a better idea of what you want to do.

    Don't go to uni because you feel you have to.
    Thank you for the reply, but I've always wanted to go to uni and I don't really want to be working for year, there's no reason for this but I personally want to be going to uni after college, its just what I've always wanted.

    (Original post by Acsel)
    If you don't have a clear idea then don't go. Simple as that. Don't waste your time and money on a course that you aren't emotionally invested in.

    Take a year (or more) out to try some things and see where you want to go and what you want to do. There's no reason to decide now.

    It's not at all bad that you don't know what you want to do at uni. You're expected to, at 18 or younger, make a decision that could shape the rest of your life. If anything most people don't give it enough thought.

    What's wrong with forensics? I'm personally studying digital forensics (the computer version of what you want to do I guess) and I enjoy it. University and a degree won't just open a job nowadays. It never really has. To get a job you still need to put the work in, search around and apply. Ignore anyone saying that it's a dumb course, it's a perfectly legitimate course. If you wanted to go into police forensics or something similar you'll need to get experiene at some point. Might as well start with a degree.

    Don't at all feel rushed and don't let other people decide for you. Do whatever you want. Do what makes you happy. Don't make any decisions until you know what that is
    I was really set on forensics but I went on this website and it showed that the average graduate salary was really low and so was the employment % and that put me off.
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    (Original post by Asma-A)
    I was really set on forensics but I went on this website and it showed that the average graduate salary was really low and so was the employment % and that put me off.
    Have you looked at the other options with your degree? https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...rensic-science
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Have you looked at the other options with your degree? https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...rensic-science
    the low employment rate is whats putting me off, I don't want to spend 3 years doing a degree and then struggle to get a job afterwards
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    (Original post by Asma-A)
    I was really set on forensics but I went on this website and it showed that the average graduate salary was really low and so was the employment % and that put me off.
    While it says the percentage of employment is low I don't feel like this is anything special. It suggests that the vast majority of people will be employed or continuing in education. 10% unemployed isn't that surprising, a small number of people won't find jobs or won't bother looking. I wouldn't be too concerned with the unemployment rate.

    The money is another matter. Forensics doesn't seem to be a particularlly high paying field. Salaries supposedly start at £16K or so and can rise to around £45K with experience. That's not to say you can't take the degree and go on to earn more, or even go into a different field. It really depends if you value the money more than doing something that interests you.

    I'd recommend doing an analysis of your life and interests. Write down absolutely everything you like and everything you are good at. Start looking for patterns or careers that would be relevant. Does an interest in forensics mean an interest in law? Or criminal behaviour? Or human biology? Step back and try to be really broad, forensics is a fairly specialised sub topic of other potential degrees. You can also be much more specific. Do you want to work at crime scenes gathering evidence? Do you want to be in a lab? And if you're not that interested in forensics, look for something else.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    While it says the percentage of employment is low I don't feel like this is anything special. It suggests that the vast majority of people will be employed or continuing in education. 10% unemployed isn't that surprising, a small number of people won't find jobs or won't bother looking. I wouldn't be too concerned with the unemployment rate.

    The money is another matter. Forensics doesn't seem to be a particularlly high paying field. Salaries supposedly start at £16K or so and can rise to around £45K with experience. That's not to say you can't take the degree and go on to earn more, or even go into a different field. It really depends if you value the money more than doing something that interests you.

    I'd recommend doing an analysis of your life and interests. Write down absolutely everything you like and everything you are good at. Start looking for patterns or careers that would be relevant. Does an interest in forensics mean an interest in law? Or criminal behaviour? Or human biology? Step back and try to be really broad, forensics is a fairly specialised sub topic of other potential degrees. You can also be much more specific. Do you want to work at crime scenes gathering evidence? Do you want to be in a lab? And if you're not that interested in forensics, look for something else.
    I am really interested in it, I would love to be able to work at crime scenes and be in labs and stuff that does appeal to me, I'm just worried if there are enough jobs out there asking for it.
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    (Original post by Asma-A)
    I am really interested in it, I would love to be able to work at crime scenes and be in labs and stuff that does appeal to me, I'm just worried if there are enough jobs out there asking for it.
    You can guarantee there will always be jobs for people. There's always going to be crime. And I don't feel like it is a popular enough degree for the market to be massively saturated. You'd still have to work for it but I don't see why you'd outright struggle to find a job. But that's the sort of thing you should research. Look at how you'd go about getting a job that you'd want. Email companies and get some information. If you are interested then get on top of it and find out what you need to do and what sort of chances you have.
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    Listen up pal, yes, you are very late with that decision, but it has been statistically proven that chemistry is the best option if you got no idea what you want to do.
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    (Original post by Asma-A)
    Helloooo,

    I am currently a year 12 student studying biology, chemistry and economics, and I have absolutely no clue what I want to do at uni. When I started college I wasn't even sure what A-levels I wanted to do, I changed about a million times and even now I'm not really happy with them, but that's only because I'm struggling with the workload which is my own personal problem, and because my college is 3 bus rides away from me which wears me thin every day! But the other day I was talking to my friend about how tough college has been and we were having a really funny conversation laughing about failing until I was like, 'I don't even know what I wanna do at uni hahaha!!' and my friend was like wow that's pretty bad like even I know what I want to do, which kinda shocked me because I really do wanna go to university, but I don't know what exactly I want to do. I don't really think about university, which may be part of my problem, but that's because I didn't get perfect GCSE's and I'm worried that wont even get me in. I want something that'll get me a good job if I'm honest because at the end of the day that's what I really want. I did want to do like forensics but people have told me that its a dumb course that won't even get me a job anywhere which put me off. (This another reason why I don't know what I want to do, because whenever I have a sort of idea, people always tell me that I won't get a good job from it...)
    If you're not sure, try going to university open days and talking to lecturers in the departments you're interested in. If the course is right for you, you'll know!

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    (Original post by Asma-A)
    Helloooo,

    I am currently a year 12 student studying biology, chemistry and economics, and I have absolutely no clue what I want to do at uni. When I started college I wasn't even sure what A-levels I wanted to do, I changed about a million times and even now I'm not really happy with them, but that's only because I'm struggling with the workload which is my own personal problem, and because my college is 3 bus rides away from me which wears me thin every day! But the other day I was talking to my friend about how tough college has been and we were having a really funny conversation laughing about failing until I was like, 'I don't even know what I wanna do at uni hahaha!!' and my friend was like wow that's pretty bad like even I know what I want to do, which kinda shocked me because I really do wanna go to university, but I don't know what exactly I want to do. I don't really think about university, which may be part of my problem, but that's because I didn't get perfect GCSE's and I'm worried that wont even get me in. I want something that'll get me a good job if I'm honest because at the end of the day that's what I really want. I did want to do like forensics but people have told me that its a dumb course that won't even get me a job anywhere which put me off. (This another reason why I don't know what I want to do, because whenever I have a sort of idea, people always tell me that I won't get a good job from it...)
    Don't stress yourself out about not know what you want to do yet- I didn't officially decide until around June Year 12. Best to actually come to the right decision than to rush it. There are many ways for you to pick the right course: university websites, university taster/open days, friends/family who've been to a certain university or who did a certain course. Work experience is good too and can help you eliminate subjects- for example, I did a week at a hospital and decided afterwards medicine wasn't for me. Also, taking a year out really isn't a bad idea. It gives you an extra year to make the decision and you can apply for internships which you get paid for and boosts your CV - meaning when it comes to applying for graduate jobs, you have work experience as well as a degree. At the end of the day, it's important to look for a subject that you're interested in so if that's forensics, then go for that. If you're concerned about doing it as a degree or want something a bit more general, perhaps something like biochemistry? Your A-Levels work well with that.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    You can guarantee there will always be jobs for people. There's always going to be crime. And I don't feel like it is a popular enough degree for the market to be massively saturated. You'd still have to work for it but I don't see why you'd outright struggle to find a job. But that's the sort of thing you should research. Look at how you'd go about getting a job that you'd want. Email companies and get some information. If you are interested then get on top of it and find out what you need to do and what sort of chances you have.
    Hey thanks for the help, I just wanted to know if maths was necessary for a forensic degree?
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    (Original post by Asma-A)
    Hey thanks for the help, I just wanted to know if maths was necessary for a forensic degree?
    I wouldn't have thought A Level Maths were necessary, although I imagine everyone would at least want a good understanding of GCSE Maths. Check university pages to see their entry requirements though. Everyone asks for different subjects. STEM subjects in general are usually a good call, but for forensics I would assume Science (probably Biology or Chemistry) would be most important. Maths is never a bad A Level to have though
 
 
 
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