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When driving, did anyone else get taught to move off from standstill this way? Watch

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    My instructor has a diesel renault clio.

    I have been taught on a flat surface, to:

    1) Clutch down, into first gear
    2) Handbrake off
    3) Bring the clutch to the biting point, just enough so you start moving
    4) Hold the clutch at that position for 1-2 seconds until you are moving properly
    5) Raise the clutch all the way whilst pressing down harder and harder on the gas

    Was anyone else taught this way? I am a bit worried. Everything I see online says to set the gas, lift the clutch up all the way, then press down on the gas to accelerate.

    Thanks
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    Sounds right, apart from 2 overlapping with 3-5, especially on hills. It's a little difficult to describe, as you need to judge the amount of clutch and accelerator to prevent stalling.
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    Sounds right, apart from 2 overlapping with 3-5, especially on hills. It's a little difficult to describe, as you need to judge the amount of clutch and accelerator to prevent stalling.
    Yeah. I have only done really shallow hills, so I could still do the method I described (apart from handbrake coming off as clutch is at the biting point) using only the clutch to get moving at first, rather than having to "set the gas".
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    Don't take the handbrake off if you've not got the bite, it's a really bad habit since you rely on there not being a small incline. If there's an incline and you've not got the bite, you'll roll backwards and could hit someone behind you. Set the gas, bring the clutch up to bite, release handbrake, accelerate.
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    Near enough. I was taught that the handbrake comes off when your at biting point because otherwise you will roll back on hills.

    You can cut out step 4 too. No point trying to get moving for 2 seconds with no gas. Go light on the gas and you can get moving straight away.

    May be he has found this to be the most effective way of teaching so you can concentrate on your feet without thinking about the handbrake. When you have been driving a while, you just do it all at the same time without needing to think. There is no step by step and waiting 1-2 seconds.
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    (Original post by Sternumator)
    Near enough. I was taught that the handbrake comes off when your at biting point because otherwise you will roll back on hills.

    You can cut out step 4 too. No point trying to get moving for 2 seconds with no gas. Go light on the gas and you can get moving straight away.
    Do you set the gas though, or do you start to press down on the gas after the clutch has come up past the biting point and you have just started to move?
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    (Original post by coldplasma)
    Don't take the handbrake off if you've not got the bite, it's a really bad habit since you rely on there not being a small incline. If there's an incline and you've not got the bite, you'll roll backwards and could hit someone behind you. Set the gas, bring the clutch up to bite, release handbrake, accelerate.
    Apart from the handbrake, when you say "accelerate", is that pressing harder and harder on the throttle whilst the clutch comes up, or is that letting the clutch up all the way, then back on the throttle?
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    I am a bit worried.
    My main worry is that you clearly don't understand the clutch yet.

    Bringing the clutch up suddenly is what causes a stall. It doesn't matter whether you 'set the gas' - bring it up quick and the amount of force going through the clutch is too much. You avoid a stall by bringing the clutch through the biting point slowly, which is what your instructor is teaching you. You can make it faster and easier by having more revs but get to that later. Your instructor sounds fine.
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    On a flat surface, in a diesel, this is correct. You'll be taught to find your bite and apply gas first before taking off the parking brake on hill starts, though.
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    Apart from the handbrake, when you say "accelerate", is that pressing harder and harder on the throttle whilst the clutch comes up, or is that letting the clutch up all the way, then back on the throttle?
    It means continue to bring the clutch up and press the gas down further if you need to. You don't need to floor the throttle, just enough to get the acceleration you want.
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    Do you set the gas though, or do you start to press down on the gas after the clutch has come up past the biting point and you have just started to move?
    You don't set the gas. Bring the clutch until it bites. Then whether you are moving or not, ease onto the gas and off the clutch. There is no need to pause at all once it is biting but, as I say, may be that is the best way to learn it. Every tutor will be different.
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    Unless you're in a car with a lot of torque in the engine, like a diesel, you should always bring the clutch up with some gas, otherwise there just won't be enough power in the engine to get you moving on inclines. To be honest I don't really know why people are teaching flats and inclines are different techniques, sure you can get away with more on a flat, but the exact same principles apply.
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    (Original post by coldplasma)
    To be honest I don't really know why people are teaching flats and inclines are different techniques, sure you can get away with more on a flat, but the exact same principles apply.
    True, but it may be to introduce the concepts separately, so that the student doesn't get overwhelmed, then overlap them later. Some places don't have too many hills, so you could avoid real hill starts until closer to the test.
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    (Original post by RogerOxon)
    True, but it may be to introduce the concepts separately, so that the student doesn't get overwhelmed, then overlap them later. Some places don't have too many hills, so you could avoid real hill starts until closer to the test.
    I think the problem I have with this is it's not always obvious when you're on a flat or an incline. Even a very small incline can cause you to roll back into the car behind you. I think teaching it one way for flats and another for hills is actually more confusing for a learner, rather than teaching a single way that works for both. The only situation I could see that would need a different approach is downhill starts, which may not even require gas.
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    Yep. I never used to apply gas when moving off. Not until I got more used to driving anyway.

    I think they think it's easier to move off, if you're only dealing with the one pedal. But it's not realistic really.
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    On a flat surface, in a diesel, this is correct. You'll be taught to find your bite and apply gas first before taking off the parking brake on hill starts, though.
    On hill starts, I have been taught the exact same procedure, but take the handbrake off when the car is at the biting point...
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    On hill starts, I have been taught the exact same procedure, but take the handbrake off when the car is at the biting point...
    Pretty much what I said then, though on steeper hills you'll need to apply gas before taking off the handbrake or you'll roll back.
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    This is how I was originally taught with my first instructor in a diesel car, now I'm driving a petrol and I struggled at first. You learn quickly though
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    (Original post by Goaded)
    This is how I was originally taught with my first instructor in a diesel car, now I'm driving a petrol and I struggled at first. You learn quickly though

    I was taught by a Japanese suicide pilot, I am as mad as a hatter.

    My car, Focus Titanium has a anti roll back device which goes off at 2 seconds, i think.

    I don't really know how I drive, I just do it, like walking, just do it.


    The diesel, petrol cars drive the ame today, my diesel goes like the clappers
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    (Original post by Goaded)
    This is how I was originally taught with my first instructor in a diesel car, now I'm driving a petrol and I struggled at first. You learn quickly though
    Yeah, that's what it seems to be like. Thanks. On a hill, I got taught the exact same procedure, but only release the handbrake when you are at the biting point (to prevent rolling back). I haven't been told to add gas before bringing the clutch to the bite on a hill. I have been told as I said before for on a flat surface, to do that on a hill: clutch down, first gear, clutch up to biting point, handbrake off, clutch up a tiny bit so you start moving, hold foot still for a second, then raise clutch all the way whilst adding gas.

    When would I need too add gas before the biting point on a hill? I haven't needed to do it yet, my instructor never even mentioned it.
 
 
 
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