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When driving, did anyone else get taught to move off from standstill this way? Watch

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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    My instructor has a diesel renault clio.

    I have been taught on a flat surface, to:

    1) Clutch down, into first gear
    2) Handbrake off
    3) Bring the clutch to the biting point, just enough so you start moving
    4) Hold the clutch at that position for 1-2 seconds until you are moving properly
    5) Raise the clutch all the way whilst pressing down harder and harder on the gas

    Was anyone else taught this way? I am a bit worried. Everything I see online says to set the gas, lift the clutch up all the way, then press down on the gas to accelerate.

    Thanks
    I was taught:
    1. Clutch down, into first gear
    2. Add gas, then slowly release the clutch until you have the bite and keep it still.
    3. Observations
    4. Handbrake off
    5. Off you go as you slowly add more gas whilst slowly releasing the clutch fully
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    I was taught:
    1. Clutch down, into first gear
    2. Add gas, then slowly release the clutch until you have the bite and keep it still.
    3. Observations
    4. Handbrake off
    5. Off you go as you slowly add more gas whilst slowly releasing the clutch fully
    Did you learn on a petrol car?
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    It drives me bonkers that instructors teach students in diesel cars, it seems like the absolute laziest way of teaching clutch control. I understand that teaching pupils how to use the clutch properly is probably one of the most frustrating things for them, but not only is it essential, but it's also the reason the pupil pays £25 an hour.
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    (Original post by MiszShortee786)
    Did you learn on a petrol car?
    Nope diesel but he taught me that way so that I would adjust well to petrol
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    People are drawing a hard distinction between petrol and diesel - that's simply not true. Of all the manual transmission petrol cars i've driven, seven, only one would not take off on clutch alone. Small cars, big cars... my current car (petrol CItoren C1) can do it. It'd be slow, but you could do it.

    And to me it makes sense to take a step-wise approach, then with experience get the student to blur the steps together. Not sure why people are talking about different techniques etc
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    Yeah, that's what it seems to be like. Thanks. On a hill, I got taught the exact same procedure, but only release the handbrake when you are at the biting point (to prevent rolling back). I haven't been told to add gas before bringing the clutch to the bite on a hill. I have been told as I said before for on a flat surface, to do that on a hill: clutch down, first gear, clutch up to biting point, handbrake off, clutch up a tiny bit so you start moving, hold foot still for a second, then raise clutch all the way whilst adding gas.

    When would I need too add gas before the biting point on a hill? I haven't needed to do it yet, my instructor never even mentioned it.
    Pulling away without gas feels like a foreign concept to me now!😂 Perhaps ask him? Say you've been doing some reading. I always use gas for moving off, and obviously more for a hill start....
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    I was initially told by my instructor to set the gas to around 1000rpm, find the bite and then release the handbrake. The car I learnt in was ridiculous and unrealistic considering most people who have just passed their test drive in cars with small engines and are usually petrol🙄 The car was like a 1.6 litre turbo Diesel engine and so that meant whilst learning 99% of the time I moved off without gas, using just the clutch.

    Driving needs to be taught in a universal way and if any instructor advises you to move off without gas, or teaches you based on how to drive their specific car then they are LAZY.

    Moving off without gas can also cause issues at junctions with people moving off with slow progression due to being taught incorrectly - to not bother setting the gas. Whereas, if you set the gas and then bring the clutch up, you move off much quicker.

    I started driving around this week and have stalled a few times due to getting used to the power of my 1.2 litre petrol car. But by setting the gas and then finding the bite it's allowing me to build speed quickly when moving off and reduced stalling.

    So this is how it should be done - Prepare, Observe, Move.

    Prepare - Set the gas, bring the clutch up to find the biting point.
    Observe - Check your central and right wing mirror and indicate if necessary.
    Move - Check your blind spot before moving off and then release the handbrake.

    Then off you go. 😄

    It's very annoying being taught in powerful and extremely forgiving cars to find yourself stalling loads of times when you first start driving your own car ON YOUR OWN (which is stressful at the best of times). But if your instructor teaches you the correct way and implements this throughout their lessons with you then it shouldn't be as much trouble when you start driving on your own in your own car.

    You'll get used to it eventually 😄
 
 
 
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