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Should women get a day off work for their period? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should women get a day off work for their period?
    Yes, it's about time!
    743
    44.02%
    No way!
    945
    55.98%

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    To be honest, my general feeling is that this sort of thing is just far too easily abused. For those who genuinely are crippled by period pain, and could medically assessed to prove that, such as those suffering with endometriosis, then yes, I believe you should be able to get a doctors note that allows for leave when you need it.

    However, for the vast majority of women, I don't believe periods warrant constant monthly sick days. They're uncomfortable, inconvenient and can indeed be painful, I've lay awake at night crying my eyes out before. However, I don't know whether I just have a well developed ability to ignore pain, but I get on with my daily life no matter how bad it is, I don't let it stop me, and I never take painkillers, just like I don't take painkillers unless it is a complete last resort for any other reason. I get that some suffer badly, and agree they should be helped out, but for the most part, women should try to just get on with it. They will a bit painful either way, so perhaps work is the best thing, so as to take your mind off it a little.

    Also, when considering the practical implications of this, giving every or even the majority of women monthly leave will have serious impact on their employability. Women already face scrutiny over maternity leave and such - adding more reasons why a female employee will likely at some point be home rather than working just makes us even less attractive to employers.

    As much as discrimination is wrong, I do somewhat sympathise with employers on this one. In their position, I cannot deny that I would not be overly excited about hiring someone I know will be off work at least once a month, and I'm female myself. To them, why would they take the woman when they can take an equally qualified man (given how many people compete for each job in the current market), to whom they will not have to award regular days off.

    Similarly, this will almost force discrimination in very small businesses where the staff work in a small network, rather than a large rota where someone else could pick up work missed. If someone runs a tiny cafe and only wants one person to work for them, what are they going to do for that day (or as some suggest, week,) that their employee won't be in each month? They will end up losing money, and having a lot of hassle to cover someone's job that they could've avoided had they discriminated and hired a man. It will make discrimination a highly attractive option for businesses that run on a day by day basis. Before anyone starts, I am not condoning discrimination, but I understand the reasoning behind it in scenarios like this, and I think a system such as this one, should it apply to every woman needlessly, will really exacerbate the problem.

    Maybe I'm being too narrow minded and only drawing on my own experiences or whatever people may accuse me of, but after all this is only my two cents on it, I'm not necessarily insisting that my viewpoint is the only one of value/ correct.
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    (Original post by xfirekittyx)
    People seem to be assuming time off = less work done.

    I think it's the Danish who have a 33 hour working week and no loss of productivity.

    If you try and force people to work whilst they are lethargic/ in a lot of pain they probably aren't going to be producing great work/ perhaps less work.

    However I feel like days off are swinging from one extreme to the other... are some woman completely unable to work some days when they are on their period? Yes.

    But... I'm sure there are many other who would just benefit from some adjustments like being able to work from home on their period. Or flexihours so maybe if they need some extra rest they can come into work later, go home early and make the time up the following week.

    There are others still who have very tolerable periods and are perfectly happy keeping to the status quo.

    So in sum: potentially but not as a blanket policy.
    These Scandinavian short weeks with no loss of productivity are a nonsense as they only work in very limited circumstances. For the vast majority of jobs it's impossible or will cost the employer hugely for extra staff. Most people can't be more productive than their hours allow. The most basic example would be a train driver. You can't do 10 hours less work for the same productivity. The train would stop two thirds the way through the journey. How do doctors or paramedics or teachers do it?
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Yes it should, but only for women with doctor's letters confirming that they experience severe pain on periods. I know people who have very mild periods. Others, like me, ended up literally screaming in agony while horizontal with contractions :pinch: In my case I think it's wrong to have to have days like that come out of my holiday and paycheck when I can't help my gender.
    The same applies for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses. We can do more to make provisions for them.
    On the surface this is "why should women get a day off but keep the same pay". And in my eyes, well that is a very valid point. But I think what you wrote in what I bolded, trumps that. Should one be disadvantaged just because one was born a woman? I think not and I think it is the morally right thing to do.

    Incidentally, Josb reply above using the #girlpower highlights exactly the problem women issues face today - a complete lack of (and willingness to) understanding. Hence making provisions is seen as "giving an unfair benefit that men don't have". Very sad.
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    Yes and no but It depends on the severity of the pain, which is individual to each woman.

    I've had days when I was 17 that reduced me to a crying mess because the pain was so bad I couldn't walk. It would have been impossible to work and be focused on a day like that. Which should be noted as a sick day.

    But I think it would affect the company unless the work could be done from home and the missed hours worked out.
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    this kind of law is not only sexist towards men but it will result in sexist effects against women - de facto, women would be far less employable than men because men wouldn't be entitled to claim a sickie for free, so men would actually put out more work per pound for their company. so it's just regressive on all fronts. just have free competition. if men and women really are equal, women wouldn't even be dreaming of such a degrading and patronising form of assistance which would make them appear like the disabled gender
    How is it sexist towards men?
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    I'm not going to stop doing anything else (exercise, errands, seeing friends etc) because I'm on my period and if I want to keep doing those then I probably need to go to work too. If your period makes you too ill to attend work you can take a sick day anyway.
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    it's a legal privilege for one gender. of course it's sexist. don't be ****ing daft. just because every single women doesn't make use of it doesn't change anything.
    It's a legal privilege to make up for a biological disadvantage.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Says who? There was a time in secondary school when I was taking off 1-2 days every single month because of terrible period pain. It's gotten better now but every so often I take the day off uni if the pain is too much
    Says someone who has zero understanding of women and zero interest in ever having one.
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    (Original post by whorefromvegas)
    Are you actually an idiot or are acting stupid so that I give up? Because im not going to carry on with this until you accept the fact that you've deliberately played dumb (or are actually dumb) to try and undermine my points. You've hardly rebutted my points and it's getting frustrating now.
    Given that I have the same experience when "arguing" with that user, I would say it's the former
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    Most GPs won't give a sick note for a few days off. I've had periods which have made me vomit, I've had kidney pain, I've had ones where I can't walk and I've had others which give me migraine.

    It's clear in this thread that men don't understand. Some periods are horrendous.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Most GPs won't give a sick note for a few days off. I've had periods which have made me vomit, I've had kidney pain, I've had ones where I can't walk and I've had others which give me migraine.

    It's clear in this thread that men don't understand. Some periods are horrendous.
    Do you need a sick note?

    I don't work in the UK, but here it's ok for us to write in sick by mail and that's it. There is a sort of trust, at least in my team, and as far as I can tell, people do not abuse it.
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    Do you need a sick note?

    I don't work in the UK, but here it's ok for us to write in sick by mail and that's it. There is a sort of trust, at least in my team, and as far as I can tell, people do not abuse it.
    You self certify for the first 7 days. After that, you need a sick note.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Yes it should, but only for women with doctor's letters confirming that they experience severe pain on periods. I know people who have very mild periods. Others, like me, ended up literally screaming in agony while horizontal with contractions :pinch: In my case I think it's wrong to have to have days like that come out of my holiday and paycheck when I can't help my gender.
    The same applies for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses. We can do more to make provisions for them.
    You should appreciate such a system, if implemented, will be abused by every women who has a doctor for a best friend.

    Essentially, such a measure becomes a backward step when it comes to addressing the wage-gap or gender inequality or whatever the latest mumbo jumbo is. So no. imo.

    Edit: Seems like you've been quoted enough :cool:
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    I'm a girl, and I said no because
    (A) it is very hard to tell which one day will be your worst. what if you think worse is yet to come and then it gets better and you didn't take leave when you most needed it? or what if you take leave expecting yourself to be at the worst level and then learn that it will get worse still?
    (B) Most people's cycles don't last 31 days. The average is closer to 20 days and that's with some abnormal women pulling the average up because they only get their periods once every 2/3 months. should a woman with two cycles in one month only get one holiday?
    (C) I get that it can be quite bad, but come on. We can't let it stop us. girls and women everywhere have had periods through disasters and hardships. you can't be a delicate buttercup and let it stop or control your whole life. unless you have a medical issue (which a doctor will issue a note for, that's a very acceptable exception to the rule) power through and get on with it. a period is not the end of the world. to a certain extent, it will be as hard as you make it.
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    (Original post by Nirvana1989-1994)
    Use BC, then you don't have to deal with that BS.
    Birth control doesn't always stop your periods :sad: And I would know, I've been on about 4 different ones (two pill ones, the implant, and the injection) and all have ****ed up my already incredibly erratic and painful periods :cry2:
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    (Original post by Waiser)
    Well, it can be done. But expect even lower pay rates. Women already have wage gap due to obvious reasons such as pregnancies which causes a little less experience in the industry therefor lower pay and a few others. But i would say no.
    How does getting pregnant make someone less experienced??? Please explain
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    In a way yes, but also in a way no. I think women should be allowed if they experience really heavy/painful periods and actually have doctor's confirmation for it.
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    I don't think giving women a monthly day off will do anything to help the wage gap or sexism in the work place.

    But at the same time, a bad period can be as debilitating as any illness. I'm on the pill now but I used to have to skip school because I'd be in such pain that I'd actually be sick, and faint. I can't imagine going to work with a proper period, although undoubtedly I'd have to face that in the future if I ever want kids!

    So I don't think women should be automatically ascribed a monthly day off, but a bad period should be treated as a genuine sick day. Because like I say, it's left me as useless as when I've had a virus/ bug.

    Best case scenario for me would be if they let you work at home for the day. But that would only be suitable in select jobs .
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    (Original post by Bright_Gift)
    How does getting pregnant make someone less experienced??? Please explain
    Maternity leave? Absences due to doctors appointment on the run up to the maternity leave? And then putting in less hours on return? Even if they continue to work full time they are less inclined to put in overtime, work weekends etc due to their commitments.

    It cannot be denied that having children can put mothers at a disadvantage in regards to career progression.
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    (Original post by discobish)
    So in Zambia women are allowed to take a day off for their period once a month, also known as 'Mother's Day'. :borat:

    This day doesn't have to be taken on 'day one' - it can be taken at any time of the month when ladies feel their menstrual cycle is interrupting their work (e.g. stomach cramps/back aches leading up to etc). (Read it in full here)

    Unsurprisingly, this has stirred up a lot of criticism from both males and females!

    As much as it sounds like a good idea... what if 10 female employees all decide to take their 'Mother's Day' on the same day?! Workplaces could crumble :zomg:

    Do you think this law is something that should be practiced in England/other countries? :hmmmm:

    Or maybe you're completely against the idea?! :hmmm::hmmm::hmmm::hmmm:
    Such a great idea. :clap2:

    Definitely in favour of it coming here, the sooner the better.

    Guys can have a day off for their anger by way of compensation.
 
 
 
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