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    (Original post by Farchitect)
    On the whole, with I'm sure a few exceptions, public schools are significantly better. The sooner they're nationalised the better. They certainly shouldn't have charitable status.
    Although I do agree with you to an extent, ther are many explanations as to why they do significantly better.
    1. They tend to be selective meaning that those who would gain the lower grades in the state school system are immediately eliminated.
    2. As they are far too expensive for th majority of the population to afford they have small class numbers and therefore teachers may not be better but have the chance to offer more support to each student


    I think that the opportunities at public schools are undoubtedly better but that's only because the schools can afford them due to their high fees. Nationalising them would totally remove all of this as the funding wouldn't be consistent.
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    Private because there are far less chavs and the students tend to speak nicely. :fluffy:
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    (Original post by Mills_B)
    Although I do agree with you to an extent, ther are many explanations as to why they do significantly better.
    1. They tend to be selective meaning that those who would gain the lower grades in the state school system are immediately eliminated.
    2. As they are far too expensive for th majority of the population to afford they have small class numbers and therefore teachers may not be better but have the chance to offer more support to each student
    3. Generallly those who are attending public schools have parents who have also been and who are intelligent or value education highly. They are therefore far more likely to value their education and work hard.

    I think that the opportunities at public schools are undoubtedly better but that's only because the schools can afford them due to their high fees. Nationalising them would totally remove all of this as the funding wouldn't be consistent.
    Its more complex than that. Government, banks, consultancy firms, the BBC, law firms, the civil service etc. are all disproportionately dominated by public school old boys/girls, especially those who went to Oxbridge. This dominance needs to be broken. Public school gives you more than education, it gives you a ready made network of top quality contacts, it gives you confidence, it teaches you the appropriate way to talk, what to wear, and how to deal with rich people. These things may seem trivial but they are not.

    In terms of the practicalities of implementing it, it would have to be phased in over say a 5 - 10 year period. However, once fully phased in, any facilities and property unable to be maintained by a standard state school budget would be given to the local authority, at least the control of it, such that it could be made available to all schools in the area to benefit from. Things like polo pitches, rowing lakes, concert halls etc.
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    (Original post by bj1)
    Subject availability - how many state schools offer Latin? Please tell me how it is useful in any shape or form in the 21st century, and why it is a disadvantage that state schools don't offer it (Apart from feeding into Oxbridge)
    The Roman Empire was quite extensive throughout Europe, the Middle East and North Africa around 2,000 years ago and was certainly the dominant force in Britain at the time. And then even after that, Latin was traditionally very prominent in formal communications amongst the ruling classes in Britain, particularly due to its association with Roman Catholicism.

    Latin is therefore extremely useful when it comes to any kind of historical research into that period, and analysis of its historical evidence. If English were to ever become a dead language a few thousand years into the future, it's obvious that any historian living around then would benefit immensely from understanding English if they wanted to do any research into our society as it is now. The benefit of Latin is similar.

    That's why it's not only private schools, but also universities that offer the opportunity to study it (alongside other "classics".

    Mixing with 'people like us' - keeping away from the 'riff raff' Not always a good thing, as soon as they enter the real world/university some get a complete shock, unless they enter Oxford followed by the House of commons to avoid the riff raff as much as possible. Whereas in state school you're surrounded by all sorts of people, who may not all be perfect but it helps if you want to work in the real world.
    I think the "real world" is different for everyone really. There aren't any fake worlds, it's just that different people spend their lives in different places surrounded by different sorts of people.

    You definitely have a point though, that if you plan to grow up and spend your time amongst people from all backgrounds, it's a little odd to isolate yourselves from them until then. But depending on which profession you go into, which sectors of society you're associating with etc. there are situations where it's certainly advantageous to be perceived as a "posh" person, rather than yourself being the "riff-raff" that certain people don't want to associate with too much.

    I myself have experienced a basic example of this after having attended private schools in Birmingham, and then moving to London straight afterwards. The comment I always got when I told people I'd lived my whole life in Birmingham is "You don't sound like it, how come you don't have the accent?". Apparently it's considered one of the ugliest accents in the country and can lower people's perceptions of your intelligence and social status considerably. But due to my sheltered upbringing amongst private school crowds, I don't have a Birmingham accent and in all honesty, I don't even know what it sounds like, wouldn't recognise one if I heard one, don't know a single word of "Brummie" dialect etc. This has worked in my favour in life, as I still don't find myself ever coming across or needing to interact with that segment of society. Since I'm pursuing a city career in London, the mannerisms and demeanours I've picked up from attending a private school are far more valuable to my personal brand.

    More sports and other non-curriculum activities I found that some private school people spent too much time doing these, and ended up doing less well academically, which I thought was the whole point going there.
    I wouldn't say the whole point of going to private school is necessarily to just do better academically, but in general to try and get the most out of life in terms of finding opportunities to develop your talents, and also to simply enjoy yourself. The good thing about offering sports and other extra-curricular activities is that it manages to identify and nurture a child's talents wherever they may lie, even if they are not academic.

    For example, the long list of notable alumni of the private school I went to include, not only top academics, but also musicians, artists, actors, sportspeople, businesspeople. chess grandmasters, and others who found their success in something other than academia. Of course people like this do come from state schools too, but not nearly in the same kinds of proportions, because the school itself is less likely to try to identify and develop those sorts of talents.

    The good thing about private schools is that they offer a broader range of opportunities and can help people to find their calling in whatever field it might be.
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    In terms of high academic quality, instilling hard and rigorous work ethic, developing drive, determination and vital career-based skills: Private school

    In terms of mixing with interesting people from all different walks of life, developing empathy, practicality and important common sense skills, learning about real life problems in a real world context: State school

    Different strokes for different folks...
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    (Original post by Lh030396)
    In terms of high academic quality, instilling hard and rigorous work ethic, developing drive, determination and vital career-based skills: Private school

    In terms of mixing with interesting people from all different walks of life, developing empathy, practicality and important common sense skills, learning about real life problems in a real world context: State school

    Different strokes for different folks...
    I personally think that going to state school also encourages hard work and work ethic, due to perhaps less resources, larger classes, mixed teaching quality - so students have to work harder since they are not spoonfed. But this very much depends on the student individually.

    If I was an admissions selector/employer and had to choose between someone who got 10 A*s at a state school and 10 A*s at a private school - I have more respect for the former who would possibly have had to work harder against all the odds.
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    (Original post by bj1)
    I personally think that going to state school also encourages hard work and work ethic, due to perhaps less resources, larger classes, mixed teaching quality - so students have to work harder since they are not spoonfed. But this very much depends on the student individually.

    If I was an admissions selector/employer and had to choose between someone who got 10 A*s at a state school and 10 A*s at a private school - I have more respect for the former who would possibly have had to work harder against all the odds.
    As an admissions tutor I would agree. As an employer though I might pick the privately educated individual, depending on the role. They'd be more likley to be more rounded, better spoken etc. Obviously an interview would confirm it one way or another though, not simply the school's name on a CV. This is a sad truth, coming from someone educated by the state.
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    The state school was a disaster, I have never been at a private school, so I can't judge what is better in comparison. Had home schooling instead and not regretted it.
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    “More than almost any developed nation, ours is a country in which your parentage dictates your progress.”

    According to Michael Gove. You know there is a problem with inequality when a Tory MP thinks there is.

    http://www.newstatesman.com/politics...ently-educated
 
 
 
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