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    This question is aimed at doctors or anyone in the later years of medical school.

    I just wanted to know how fast you feel med school goes. I'm in my first year and can't wait to finish mainly because I don't like my uni and want to come home all the time but at the same time it is nice not have the responsibility of having to go to work everyday and it's going to be very scary to be a junior doctor... People with normal degrees tend to say the 3 years go fast but for medics what is it like? Did you find uni went fast or did it drag endlessly?
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    I think it was variable - there were parts that seem to drag, and parts that went by quickly. I spent 6 1/2 years at med school and overall it seemed to go by pretty quickly. I think clinical years were particularly fast, perhaps because the placements / travelling / hours were quite intense. personally I didn't enjoy preclinical years so much and it seemed to take quite a long time to get them out of the way.

    I'm sorry you don't like your uni. It can be hard when you feel like you've got most of your time ahead of you still. Whilst yes it can feel nice not to have the responsibility of going to work each day (and I totally get that you're trying to find positives in your situation), realistically in clinical years this *is* what is expected - you won't have specific responsibility for patients, but you'll be expected to attend generally full time hours in hospital.

    What's making uni feel so hard for you? The town, the people, the fact that it's not home, the course style? No matter how much you can hope that it'll go by quickly, it is still 5 years of your life and it would be a shame to be miserable for all of it, and I would really hope that there would be some things that people could do to make the time a bit better for you. Have you spoken to your tutors about it?
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    (Original post by junior.doctor)
    I think it was variable - there were parts that seem to drag, and parts that went by quickly. I spent 6 1/2 years at med school and overall it seemed to go by pretty quickly. I think clinical years were particularly fast, perhaps because the placements / travelling / hours were quite intense. personally I didn't enjoy preclinical years so much and it seemed to take quite a long time to get them out of the way.

    I'm sorry you don't like your uni. It can be hard when you feel like you've got most of your time ahead of you still. Whilst yes it can feel nice not to have the responsibility of going to work each day (and I totally get that you're trying to find positives in your situation), realistically in clinical years this *is* what is expected - you won't have specific responsibility for patients, but you'll be expected to attend generally full time hours in hospital.

    What's making uni feel so hard for you? The town, the people, the fact that it's not home, the course style? No matter how much you can hope that it'll go by quickly, it is still 5 years of your life and it would be a shame to be miserable for all of it, and I would really hope that there would be some things that people could do to make the time a bit better for you. Have you spoken to your tutors about it?
    Agree with this, clinical years definitely go faster.

    @OP, are you in pre-clinical years atm?
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    I also thought I would add - personally I found the first winter at uni to be particularly arduous, and I wonder if there are others who have felt that way too. A combination of getting used to the uni style of working and studying, the challenges of preclinical medicine, I was certainly not a social butterfly and it took me quite a long time to settle in and find my 'niche' from this perspective. The cold dark short days of winter, likely your first winter away from your usual friends and family, so adapting to the social and logistical challenges of that too. I do seem to remember that once the winter months passed and the spring arrived, the combination of that, plus finding my place a bit more socially, plus knowing that first year was nearly at an end which signified progressing onwards, did make a difference.
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    So by the end of my journey I will have spent seven years in 'medicine', from starting to finish with two intercalations in between. Medicine will go fast but you'll lament just how quickly the pre-clinical years went by when you're stuck in 4th, 5th year. Clinical years do go fast but not in a pleasant 'my 4 month Summer break went surprisingly fast' kinda way. Intercalated years are great because you get to experience 'normal' time for a little bit.
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    (Original post by junior.doctor)
    I also thought I would add - personally I found the first winter at uni to be particularly arduous, and I wonder if there are others who have felt that way too. A combination of getting used to the uni style of working and studying, the challenges of preclinical medicine, I was certainly not a social butterfly and it took me quite a long time to settle in and find my 'niche' from this perspective. The cold dark short days of winter, likely your first winter away from your usual friends and family, so adapting to the social and logistical challenges of that too. I do seem to remember that once the winter months passed and the spring arrived, the combination of that, plus finding my place a bit more socially, plus knowing that first year was nearly at an end which signified progressing onwards, did make a difference.
    Hmm I don't know about that. I've just had my first semester and it's flown by. I guess I don't have any other uni time to compare it to though. But I feel like I only started it yesterday and it was over before I knew it. Revising for the Semester 1 exams and even that just keeps creeping up. I'm not a big social person either.

    I think for me, it's because of the way the course is designed. It's PBL so you're just going from case to case every week and it never seems like there's enough time to complete the case so it's over and you're on to the next one before you know it!
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    Hey!
    I'm not a doctor yet but I'm heading towards the end of my medical course.

    First of all, I want to say that there's no definite answer to the question "does med school go fast?" because it's very subjective and, as you can imagine, it will vary depending on a number of factors including your attitude towards it.

    I can only talk about my own personal experience and, for me, it has been kind of an endless journey.
    My attitude since first year has been pretty much "can't wait to finish and be a doctor" and I've always been quite negative/critical about my uni, how the course is structured etc... but I never really did anything about it and if I could go back now, I would probably have a different approach.

    I would say, as you're in first year, if you feel like you don't like your uni maybe just give it some time and you will adjust. Try to enjoy all aspects of uni life so join societies, do extracurricular stuff and make new friends!
    If you feel like you're not happy with the course or if you feel like you're struggling talk to someone, don't keep it to yourself.
    Most unis offer a lot of support so there'll be a tutor that you can talk to and you should have access to pastoral care as well.
    In general, try to be positive and proactive and make the most of the opportunities you're offered, you have a lot to look forward to: intercalating is a great opportunity to develop your interest in a particular area of medicine, clinical years are amazing as it all gets suddenly very intense but at the same time exciting, and relevant and you certainly won't get bored! Also go abroad for your medical elective, it's a great opportunity to visit a different country and experience healthcare outside the NHS.

    Sorry about the long message but I guess the bottom line is: enjoy life as a med student, you will be a doctor for many years to come so there's no rush to get there and as long as you have the right attitude uni will be a great experience even though it might not pass as fast as you would hope.
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    I think a lot of people find the first term hard - settling into uni life, getting used to the different work style etc. I always felt the terms dragged by, but then at the end was amazed how quickly it had gone! I didn't really find a good group of friends in my first term, and then got glandular fever over the Christmas holidays so couldn't be very sociable at the start of the next term. Fortunately, however, I started to make better friends in the Lent and Easter terms (one of my friends broke her leg so we were invalids together!) and settled in more.

    Try to avoid going home all the time - it's the easy option but the more you do it, the harder it is for you to get involved in uni life. Sure, the odd weekend or special occasion is fine, but don't let it become your default option. There will be societies to try out and social things going on which you will miss, and then you'll feel you don't fit in, and the cycle perpetuates itself.
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    Not fast enough for me. Pre-clinical years dragged much more than clinical years, though.
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    3rd year GEP (4th year content) at Barts. Found the first year to be tough and dragged on but clinical years go so quickly. Thoroughly enjoying the content and being in the hospital.

    I'd say my previous degree went slower than clinical years are at the moment.

    As everyone else has said - you go through peaks and troughs of enjoying medicine and university life. But yeah, clinical years rock so just look forward to that!
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    In my final year, went quite fast!! I did not like university at first, but started to enjoy it quite quickly after year 1. Think setting in is particularly difficult and I feel like it's hard to truly connect with people during the first half of first year since everyone is so *freshers excited* Afterwards, everyone gets more comfortable and you really connect with people who share your interests!

    If you want to be a doctor, hang in there! If you have any mental issues/need support, reach out to your support network (family, school friends) and pastoral support at your medical school!
 
 
 
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