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    Hello there. Thanks for reading this.

    I'm sure this problem is not unusual for a soon to be graduate, but it has been bothering me for a while now, and so I was wondering if anyone could offer any advice or wisdom.

    The truth of the matter is that I'm scared of entering the world of work. Specifically, I'm worried that I'm going to be terrible at my job. I've had several part time jobs as a student where this has happened, and in the end, it seemed staff would rather I were not there.

    As these were some of my first jobs, there was obviously a huge learning curve. I'm not going to say that I wasn't responsible for it- I wanted nothing more than to do my best for the organisations I worked for, but ultimately I lacked initiative, and didn't have the common sense to think far enough ahead. It was a hard lesson to learn, but it certainly gave me food for thought with regards to how I approach work.

    I see my friends and family, and even people who I thought would struggle to adapt to working life, having full time jobs, enjoying them, and perhaps the most striking thing of all, excelling at them. I admire them so much for this, and hope that one day I can be as good as they are at whatever I do.

    Yet, I am held back by this fear that no matter what I do, I will be terrible at it, and that people will see me simply as a nuisance, rather than someone who can contribute to a company or working life in general. I'm not afraid of having to work hard, do long hours, or complete tasks that I will not enjoy. What I am afraid of is being trapped in a vicious mindset of having to do a job everyday that I, and everyone else knows, that I am terrible at. I suppose you could say that I don't want to cause trouble for anyone else as an employee.

    I want to make it clear that I am not looking for sympathy, or to be mollycoddled by writing this, nor do I want to look for ways to avoid 'the real world'. I want to work, and whilst doing my part time jobs, I have always taken pride in the fact that I was working; I felt that I had a sense of purpose and duty, and was growing up, and, to be truly honest, I've worked too damn hard at school To sit around doing nothing. Having said that, I don't believe I am entitled to any job simply because I have a degree, and understand that, in many jobs, you have to start from the bottom, something that I am entirely willing to do.

    Ultimately, the reason for my question is to understand how to ultimately ensure that you are efficient and good at your job, because that is where I can find enjoyment in my work. I want to enter the working world as confidently and as knowledgable as possible, and not be one of these deluded graduates who thinks the world owes them a favour. Equally, I want to know how to overcome these feelings of worry about entering the world of full time work.

    If anyone could offer any advice, or words of wisdom about how to do this, it would be greatly appreciated.

    I apologise for the length of this post.

    Thank you for any responses.



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    Without meaning this to come across as patronising (so apologies if it does!), it does sound like it is your confidence that is the problem here.

    I think you're right in that it isn't too unusual to be scared of this - when you actually think about the idea of entering the world of work for the next 50-or-so years, it's quite overwhelming so pretty natural to be worried about that!

    So I guess the first thing to say is, even if you were terrible at your job, it's not the end of the world. It's not the 'only' job, and if you ended up in a job that wasn't right for you and weren't brilliant at it, that would be ok, you could find another job.

    Secondly, I think part-time jobs often do feel different to full-time 'career' jobs. It's absolutely normal to feel unsure, awkward and silly at first in a job - I think all new starters go through the initial awkwardness and anxiety about not knowing what they're doing, who to ask questions to, what to do when they've finished a task and don't know what to do next, uncertainty about jumping in and 'taking over' before they're confident, etc etc. The 'taking the initiative' and 'common sense' does happen over time though. For some it takes longer than others, but as you get more confident in a job it does happen. I can very much relate - I have severe social anxiety and huge difficulties in even communicating at first, so I had extra support when I worked to help me start taking the lead and putting myself forward more. And honestly, I was terrified. 4 months into my job and I ended up on my first ever alone flight (ok, only from Gatwick to Glasgow, but I never thought I would get on a plane alone!) and led focus groups with a group of strangers alone. So it honestly does get easier!

    Do try not to compare yourself too much to other people. It sounds like your biggest worry is that other people will judge you or find you annoying/in the way/etc there. But that is anxiety, it doesn't mean it's reality! It might also be worth bearing in mind that in a lot of jobs there will be things like mentoring or 'buddy' schemes, which might be worth considering if it was available, as somewhere to get involved and get confident in knowing what you're doing in a new job. Other things I'd suggest are talking to a new line manager, being open from the start and asking what they recommend to help you take initiative and get involved or take the lead on things when you're not sure. Most line managers will be very understanding and happy to 'show you the ropes' a bit.

    Do you know what kind of jobs you're going to be looking at for after you graduate?
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    Well, sunshine, I'm afraid you just have to go for it. What will you live off of if you never go out to work? You can't live in your "safe space" forever, you know.
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    (Original post by 5845forest)
    Hello there. Thanks for reading this.

    I'm sure this problem is not unusual for a soon to be graduate, but it has been bothering me for a while now, and so I was wondering if anyone could offer any advice or wisdom.

    The truth of the matter is that I'm scared of entering the world of work. Specifically, I'm worried that I'm going to be terrible at my job. I've had several part time jobs as a student where this has happened, and in the end, it seemed staff would rather I were not there.

    As these were some of my first jobs, there was obviously a huge learning curve. I'm not going to say that I wasn't responsible for it- I wanted nothing more than to do my best for the organisations I worked for, but ultimately I lacked initiative, and didn't have the common sense to think far enough ahead. It was a hard lesson to learn, but it certainly gave me food for thought with regards to how I approach work.

    I see my friends and family, and even people who I thought would struggle to adapt to working life, having full time jobs, enjoying them, and perhaps the most striking thing of all, excelling at them. I admire them so much for this, and hope that one day I can be as good as they are at whatever I do.

    Yet, I am held back by this fear that no matter what I do, I will be terrible at it, and that people will see me simply as a nuisance, rather than someone who can contribute to a company or working life in general. I'm not afraid of having to work hard, do long hours, or complete tasks that I will not enjoy. What I am afraid of is being trapped in a vicious mindset of having to do a job everyday that I, and everyone else knows, that I am terrible at. I suppose you could say that I don't want to cause trouble for anyone else as an employee.

    I want to make it clear that I am not looking for sympathy, or to be mollycoddled by writing this, nor do I want to look for ways to avoid 'the real world'. I want to work, and whilst doing my part time jobs, I have always taken pride in the fact that I was working; I felt that I had a sense of purpose and duty, and was growing up, and, to be truly honest, I've worked too damn hard at school To sit around doing nothing. Having said that, I don't believe I am entitled to any job simply because I have a degree, and understand that, in many jobs, you have to start from the bottom, something that I am entirely willing to do.

    Ultimately, the reason for my question is to understand how to ultimately ensure that you are efficient and good at your job, because that is where I can find enjoyment in my work. I want to enter the working world as confidently and as knowledgable as possible, and not be one of these deluded graduates who thinks the world owes them a favour. Equally, I want to know how to overcome these feelings of worry about entering the world of full time work.

    If anyone could offer any advice, or words of wisdom about how to do this, it would be greatly appreciated.

    I apologise for the length of this post.

    Thank you for any responses.
    You could try volunteering to gain some work experience and build your confidence. Once you've done a couple of volunteer work placements, the whole idea of applying for real jobs won't seem so daunting. While you're still at uni, visit your student union. They can give you advice and maybe find you a part-time job at the uni.

    I think also you need to stop worrying over what other people think, and just do as best you can. Be open to learning from others and try to chill out. No one expects you to be an expert if it is your first time doing a job/task. Don't be so hard on yourself. Confidence and expertise will come to you.

    Good luck in the job hunt. :thumbsup:
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    (Original post by Len Goodman)
    Well, sunshine, I'm afraid you just have to go for it. What will you live off of if you never go out to work? You can't live in your "safe space" forever, you know.
    I appreciate your response, but please don't call me 'sunshine'.
    Furthermore, as I said in my post, I'm not looking to not work and stay in this 'safe space' you speak of. In fact I'm trying to avoid becoming a mollycoddled, disillusioned graduate.
    Nevertheless, thank you for your response, and i appreciate you taking the time to answer my question, especially given the length.


    Thanks to everyone who responded actually. It's really reassured me.


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    Between school and uni I got an apprenticeship at an accounting firm. It didn't work out and they said I wasn't cut out for accounting. So what I did was do some voluntary work and unpaid internships to build confidence.Then gave accounting another go at another firm and it worked out and I've worked there for last 3 summers paid and going to apply for a graduate role at a top 4 accounting firm.
 
 
 
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