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    Who here agrees that our education has been downgraded with this riduculous tier sytem? Who here agrees it is a way for the likes of Blair to say exam results have bben the best they have ever been.
    Before the tier system we had a respected system that universities could trust, now it's doubtful?
    I find the present system workable, but appauling. Ladies and Gentleman what be your views?
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    Is this thread saying that exams are getting easier? What is the tier system exactly.
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    (Original post by Eddie87-04)
    Who here agrees that our education has been downgraded with this riduculous tier sytem? Who here agrees it is a way for the likes of Blair to say exam results have bben the best they have ever been.
    Before the tier system we had a respected system that universities could trust, now it's doubtful?
    I find the present system workable, but appauling. Ladies and Gentleman what be your views?
    Me! Having spoken to my music teacher about what she did for A-level Music decades ago, I can say that today's system is much easier, for this subject at least.

    HOWEVER - we are put under such a tremendous strain due to the sheer quantity of exams we have to take, so today's A-levels are by no means an easy option. All these factors lead me to the conclusion that the system needs a radical overhaul, or maybe simply a return to basics.
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    (Original post by musicman)
    HOWEVER - we are put under such a tremendous strain due to the sheer quantity of exams we have to take, so today's A-levels are by no means an easy option. All these factors lead me to the conclusion that the system needs a radical overhaul, or maybe simply a return to basics.
    http://www.geocities.com/musicplanet2k/education.htm
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    QCA sent me an 'undeliverable mail' automated response with the message: "550 5.7.1 This system has been configured to reject your mail".

    LOL!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    HOWEVER - we are put under such a tremendous strain due to the sheer quantity of exams we have to take, so today's A-levels are by no means an easy option. All these factors lead me to the conclusion that the system needs a radical overhaul, or maybe simply a return to basics.
    http://www.14-19reform.gov.uk/
    It's on the cards
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    http://www.14-19reform.gov.uk/
    It's on the cards
    It's already started!
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    The people who designed KeySkills should be burnt alive, and then consigned to a special part of hell where they would be forced to learn how to MailMerge for the rest of eternity...
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    I meant in comparison with GCSEs and the old Gcses (O-levels - i think). I don't think thta A-levels have got easier, its the GCSEs that peed me off.
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    (Original post by Eddie87-04)
    I meant in comparison with GCSEs and the old Gcses (O-levels - i think). I don't think thta A-levels have got easier, its the GCSEs that peed me off.
    I think A levels have got easier.

    20 years ago 3 A levels (at A grade) was extremely rare and would guarantee the holder a place at a University of some repute. 3 A levels at "A" really isn't that unusual today.

    Of course you could argue that this is because teachers are better and students are brighter than they were 20 years ago.

    However, this simply doesn't tally with what University Deans are saying; that (for example) students with a "good" A level in maths are unable to cope with the demands of the math elements of even the first year science based degrees and need additional tutoring to bring them up to speed. This wasn't the case 20 years ago.

    I've picked math as an example but don't think any sensible person would regard A levels today as the same gold standard they once were. IMO A level grades have been politisized (in short, inflated and fuc*ed with for political gain)
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I think A levels have got easier.

    20 years ago 3 A levels (at A grade) was extremely rare and would guarantee the holder a place at a University of some repute. 3 A levels at "A" really isn't that unusual today.

    Of course you could argue that this is because teachers are better and students are brighter than they were 20 years ago.

    However, this simply doesn't tally with what University Deans are saying; that (for example) students with a "good" A level in maths are unable to cope with the demands of the math elements of even the first year science based degrees and need additional tutoring to bring them up to speed. This wasn't the case 20 years ago.

    I've picked math as an example but don't think any sensible person would regard A levels today as the same gold standard they once were. IMO A level grades have been politisized (in short, inflated and fuc*ed with for political gain)
    However it could also be argued that the reason that more people have better grades at A-level is because

    1) There are more options for people after GCSE's so some people who may have done worse at A-level in the pass now take other routes

    2) There is a great variety of subjects available to students so they can take subjects that play more to their strengths

    3) People take units spread over the 2 years which means that there is less pressure on people in the final year.

    4) There is a greater amount of coursework which isn't necissarly easier it just involves different skills.
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    (Original post by randdom)
    However it could also be argued that the reason that more people have better grades at A-level is because

    1) There are more options for people after GCSE's so some people who may have done worse at A-level in the pass now take other routes

    2) There is a great variety of subjects available to students so they can take subjects that play more to their strengths

    3) People take units spread over the 2 years which means that there is less pressure on people in the final year.

    4) There is a greater amount of coursework which isn't necissarly easier it just involves different skills.
    Maybe. I don't know since I didn't do A levels 20 years ago or yesterday so really can't comment with much authority.
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    (Original post by randdom)
    However it could also be argued that the reason that more people have better grades at A-level is because

    1) There are more options for people after GCSE's so some people who may have done worse at A-level in the pass now take other routes

    2) There is a great variety of subjects available to students so they can take subjects that play more to their strengths

    3) People take units spread over the 2 years which means that there is less pressure on people in the final year.

    4) There is a greater amount of coursework which isn't necissarly easier it just involves different skills.
    And that students can drop those subjects they are not so good at after AS levels, and that resits can improve on their grades. The courses are also modular, not linear so it is not a case of one big final exam at the end of two years - they have the benefit of seeing exactly how much progress they are making.

    They have greater access to extra resources via the internet. Teachers are far more accountable and therefore have more pressure put on them to ensure their students are well prepared for their exams. League tables raise the stakes too, particularly as they are in the public eye.

    IMO this does not mean that they are any easier, rather that they are more accessible.

    Whilst some universities may need to bring their Maths students 'up to steam' the most successful ones do not have this need as their students are of a higher calibre!
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    If they were to change the UK school system I suggest getting rid of so many exams!!!

    Why on earth do we need to take so many from such a young age? It all adds to pressure and stress that we really don't need. However, I do agree with the wider range of subjects that are now available. It allows the less academic of us to carry on with an education and make people realise thier strengths which is probably why grades are getting higher.

    Also there is a greater importance placed on going to college and university now then in the past. this means that students have to work harder - so higher grades.
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    (Original post by Wise One)
    The people who designed KeySkills should be burnt alive, and then consigned to a special part of hell where they would be forced to learn how to MailMerge for the rest of eternity...
    Oh yes. Murder is too good for them.
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    (Original post by Eddie87-04)
    Who here agrees that our education has been downgraded with this riduculous tier sytem? Who here agrees it is a way for the likes of Blair to say exam results have bben the best they have ever been.
    Before the tier system we had a respected system that universities could trust, now it's doubtful?
    I find the present system workable, but appauling. Ladies and Gentleman what be your views?
    I live in Norway, and here the education system is completely deterioated. Basicly whenever there has been a problem of decreasing standard (as an example Maths results have been falling quite low) it has always been "solved" by issuing a reform which in practice has had the direct consequence of slashing th syllabus. The outcome is that Norway now have the poorest Mathematics results in Europe, and universities such as Cambridge only accept Norwegian undergraduate students if they have either taken an alternative education (such as the IB ) or if they have a Norwegian Bachelour in Maths. Thus my warning is that you should be careful to reform the system too much as it is most likely to lead to further degration of the academic level, and instead put more focus in smaller classes, more hours a week and better educational requirements for teachers. The problem is that all of these are methods which will cost money. Eventually you come to a state where no reform whatsoever will be able to increase standards and decrease costs at the same time. Those are two qualities of a system that are inversely related in the long run.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    However, this simply doesn't tally with what University Deans are saying; that (for example) students with a "good" A level in maths are unable to cope with the demands of the math elements of even the first year science based degrees and need additional tutoring to bring them up to speed. This wasn't the case 20 years ago.

    I've picked math as an example but don't think any sensible person would regard A levels today as the same gold standard they once were. IMO A level grades have been politisized (in short, inflated and fuc*ed with for political gain)
    Absolutely. The important thing to bear in mind is that the government have everything to gain by creating an illusion of greater education and literacy than has ever been present before whereas the universities and employers who actually point out the fact that students are leaving school with fewer and inferior skills now than they used to have absolutely nothing to gain by doing so. That Milliband fellow didnt impress me at all when he was on Newsnight a couple of weeks ago, when confronted with this pretty conclusive fact he waffled on about how hed been at Imperial and met bright young school kids who could look forward to access to university which had not been available in previous years. Any politician incapable of answering a relevant question with a relevant answer should be hung.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Absolutely. The important thing to bear in mind is that the government have everything to gain by creating an illusion of greater education and literacy than has ever been present before whereas the universities and employers who actually point out the fact that students are leaving school with fewer and inferior skills now than they used to have absolutely nothing to gain by doing so. That Milliband fellow didnt impress me at all when he was on Newsnight a couple of weeks ago, when confronted with this pretty conclusive fact he waffled on about how hed been at Imperial and met bright young school kids who could look forward to access to university which had not been available in previous years. Any politician incapable of answering a relevant question with a relevant answer should be hung.
    When my dad did his A levels 20 years ago Imperial gave him a conditional offer where he would get a place on the Physics course and a Scholarship if he obtained BB amongst A level Physics and Maths. If that doesnt prove that the standard these days is lower then i dont know what....
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    (Original post by Jonatan)
    When my dad did his A levels 20 years ago Imperial gave him a conditional offer where he would get a place on the Physics course and a Scholarship if he obtained BB amongst A level Physics and Maths. If that doesnt prove that the standard these days is lower then i dont know what....
    Thats rather frightening, but fairly conclusive id say.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Thats rather frightening, but fairly conclusive id say.
    Today they have AAB as typical offer.
 
 
 
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