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GCSE, A-level & uni Arabic - AMA (graduate & tutor) Watch

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    Hi, since I'm using these forums for some research into postgraduate issues I thought I would try to be helpful in advising on studying for Arabic - be it GCSE, A-level, university or just for fun. I graduated in Arabic and one of the things I do is tutor GCSE and A-level students (and all my GCSE guys have got As...so far...)

    I'm not a native but I have helped Arab friends with their fusha Arabic. I like Levantine Arabic and I'm keen to meet anyone from that background specifically with an interest in writing, theatre, poetry, performance and general artistic and cultural kinks (if you recognise the guy in my profile pic then even cooler).

    Feel free to ask and I'll do my best within circumstances.
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    (Original post by Kurdt)
    Hi, since I'm using these forums for some research into postgraduate issues I thought I would try to be helpful in advising on studying for Arabic - be it GCSE, A-level, university or just for fun. I graduated in Arabic and one of the things I do is tutor GCSE and A-level students (and all my GCSE guys have got As...so far...)

    I'm not a native but I have helped Arab friends with their fusha Arabic. I like Levantine Arabic and I'm keen to meet anyone from that background specifically with an interest in writing, theatre, poetry, performance and general artistic and cultural kinks (if you recognise the guy in my profile pic then even cooler).

    Feel free to ask and I'll do my best within circumstances.
    What was studying Arabic like? Did you get to visit an Arabic-speaking country? (Or have you during your studies or after them etc...)
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    What was studying Arabic like? Did you get to visit an Arabic-speaking country? (Or have you during your studies or after them etc...)
    Many people from non-Arab Muslim family would have exposure to Arabic from the Quran. They may be able to recite it perfectly but not understand a word. Yes, weird, and a little medieval in my opinion.

    At SOAS in my days, third year students had the option of taking a study year abroad either at the University of Damascus, Syria (clearly not an option now) or the University of Alexandria, Egypt. Then they finish their final fourth year. I went Damascus in 2001 but I haven't been to an Arabic-speaking country since.

    I think Arabic grammar is actually very mathematical once you overcome the alphabet. I've had people with zero Arabic in the beginning master the alphabet in 12 hours.

    You can find native speakers to learn Arabic online via preply.com or italki.com
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    Hi there! Do you know of any good study resources? Any specific way I should be revising that's more effective? Thanks
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    (Original post by Charlielo)
    Hi there! Do you know of any good study resources? Any specific way I should be revising that's more effective? Thanks
    Hi, it depends on what level you're talking about. I'm going to assume beginner self-study. To get a taster try Mastering Arabic by Jane Wightwick. It has cute cartoons and the recent editions now have online videos too.

    Although I've never used it myself, the big thing for vocab learning I'm hearing all the bloggers speak about is the Anki app.

    I personally liked putting up post-it notes in my room and once I felt I knew it I would throw it away.

    Hope that's useful.
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    (Original post by Kurdt)
    Hi, it depends on what level you're talking about. I'm going to assume beginner self-study. To get a taster try Mastering Arabic by Jane Wightwick. It has cute cartoons and the recent editions now have online videos too.

    Although I've never used it myself, the big thing for vocab learning I'm hearing all the bloggers speak about is the Anki app.

    I personally liked putting up post-it notes in my room and once I felt I knew it I would throw it away.

    Hope that's useful.
    Haha sorry I'm in gcse level, sorry I didn't specify!, and thanks a bunch will definitely try it out!
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    (Original post by Kurdt)
    Hi, since I'm using these forums for some research into postgraduate issues I thought I would try to be helpful in advising on studying for Arabic - be it GCSE, A-level, university or just for fun. I graduated in Arabic and one of the things I do is tutor GCSE and A-level students (and all my GCSE guys have got As...so far...)

    I'm not a native but I have helped Arab friends with their fusha Arabic. I like Levantine Arabic and I'm keen to meet anyone from that background specifically with an interest in writing, theatre, poetry, performance and general artistic and cultural kinks (if you recognise the guy in my profile pic then even cooler).

    Feel free to ask and I'll do my best within circumstances.
    I've only found writing to be the hardest, students tend to memorise paragraphs beforehand and simply jot it all down for memory. Any tips for writing?
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    (Original post by amal29)
    I've only found writing to be the hardest, students tend to memorise paragraphs beforehand and simply jot it all down for memory. Any tips for writing?
    An online resource for native speakers to check your writing is
    http://lang-8.com/

    If you're doing GCSE or A-level, it makes sense to do the essays questions from past papers and then use them as a basis for revision.

    If you give more details, perhaps I can give a more focussed response.
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    (Original post by Kurdt)
    An online resource for native speakers to check your writing is
    http://lang-8.com/

    If you're doing GCSE or A-level, it makes sense to do the essays questions from past papers and then use them as a basis for revision.

    If you give more details, perhaps I can give a more focussed response.
    Yes, my apologies.

    I'm in year 11 and will be giving my Arabic GCSE exam later this May. I don't have an issue with the reading, writing, or speaking units. However, writing it a bit challenging. We are required to write on a given prompt which prescribes to either of the following themes: media, travel and culture or sport, leisure and work.

    Is there any pre-written article that I can use for reference or any site which would aid in this task?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by amal29)
    Yes, my apologies.

    I'm in year 11 and will be giving my Arabic GCSE exam later this May. I don't have an issue with the reading, writing, or speaking units. However, writing it a bit challenging. We are required to write on a given prompt which prescribes to either of the following themes: media, travel and culture or sport, leisure and work.

    Is there any pre-written article that I can use for reference or any site which would aid in this task?

    Thanks!
    It sounds like you're doing the Edexcel paper. What you describe sounds like a common situation. I'm assuming you come from a native speaking background as you don't state speaking is a problem too like many non-natives do.

    I am assuming your handwriting is ok.

    I don't know any specific article on the topic.

    Do you have trouble with vocab and grammar? The former you can consolidate with advice here:
    https://www.alexstrick.com/blog/2013...ing-vocabulary You can find the vocab list on the exam board website (I assume you have downloaded all their past papers and answers).

    The latter needs more work. If you have a look at the past paper examiner's reports they give real sample answers. Just copy the good one and avoid mistakes of the bad ones.
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    (Original post by Kurdt)
    It sounds like you're doing the Edexcel paper. What you describe sounds like a common situation. I'm assuming you come from a native speaking background as you don't state speaking is a problem too like many non-natives do.

    I am assuming your handwriting is ok.

    I don't know any specific article on the topic.

    Do you have trouble with vocab and grammar? The former you can consolidate with advice here:
    https://www.alexstrick.com/blog/2013...ing-vocabulary You can find the vocab list on the exam board website (I assume you have downloaded all their past papers and answers).

    The latter needs more work. If you have a look at the past paper examiner's reports they give real sample answers. Just copy the good one and avoid mistakes of the bad ones.
    Nah, I'm English, no native background in Arabic.

    I'll take a look at the examiner reports, thank's for the tip!
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    (Original post by amal29)
    Nah, I'm English, no native background in Arabic.

    I'll take a look at the examiner reports, thank's for the tip!
    Assuming you can type in Arabic I am happy to make an attempt to go through a past paper question here. Probably only for today though.
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    (Original post by Kurdt)
    Assuming you can type in Arabic I am happy to make an attempt to go through a past paper question here. Probably only for today though.
    No, I'm sorry, I don't quite know how to type in Arabic. It take's quite a while.

    However, if you could give me a sample related to one of the topics, that'll be splendid. Would that work?
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    (Original post by amal29)
    No, I'm sorry, I don't quite know how to type in Arabic. It take's quite a while.

    However, if you could give me a sample related to one of the topics, that'll be splendid. Would that work?
    Off the hoof -

    2016 writing paper

    Q1a

    Write a letter about a your new town: neighbours, clubs, likes/dislikes

    Keyword letter

    30-70 words

    Think basically each sentence is 10 words - verb - subject (with adjective) - object (with adjective) adverb - conjunction/ joining phrase VS(A)O(A) again

    As a letter you need to start off like this

    عزيزي if male
    or عزيزتي if female

    then a phrase like

    تحية طيبة و بعد

    already 6 words from 30

    لقد وصلنا إلى المدينة الجديدة اليوم. لا أعرف أحداً هنا. المدينة كبيرة و جميلة. التقينا بالجيران و وجدناهم طيبين. سأزور نادي الرياضة غداً


    etc end

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    How long did it take you to be able to read the Arabic language fluently? I'm applying to do Arabic at university next year and I'm unsure how long it would take me to learn the Arabic alphabet and what letter corresponds with what, etc.
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    (Original post by Rex Onocrotalus)
    How long did it take you to be able to read the Arabic language fluently? I'm applying to do Arabic at university next year and I'm unsure how long it would take me to learn the Arabic alphabet and what letter corresponds with what, etc.
    Thanks for your question and reviving the thread.

    Many Muslims of non-Arabic backgrounds have a reading knowledge of the language from studying the Quran at a young age. Often they may have pronunciation deficiencies and they do not understand what they read.

    I have seen intelligent motivated people without that background master pronunciation and handwriting in 12 hours.

    I first start with learning a stock of vocab - words of things around you: pen, paper etc to make sure you have a practice with the sounds. Then handwriting "ah, that's how you write qalam for pen" then pronunciation drilling based upon the scheme they use in Indian sub-continent schools.

    Pronunciation is most important at beginner stage. Leading light of polyglot community Gabe Wyner stresses this. This should take take 8-12 hours. 1-2-1 native/fluent/ proficient tutor needed for that and handwriting. You can do online too with Wacom Intous tablet (£50 Amazon).
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    HiI want my daughter to start doing arabic as a second language, working up to GCSE. She can read it already.What are the best GCSE books to study? I've seen the Arabic as a companion - looks good. Are there any other books - what is your opinion of them please!thanksUmar
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    (Original post by blueskies77)
    HiI want my daughter to start doing arabic as a second language, working up to GCSE. She can read it already.What are the best GCSE books to study? I've seen the Arabic as a companion - looks good. Are there any other books - what is your opinion of them please!thanksUmar
    The GCSE scheme has changed recently and with a master's now to focus on for the next academic year I'm afraid I haven't been following trends as I ought to for a former tutor.

    GCSE has always been a tough one for me. My GCSE tutees were already very good with their language skills and needed exam training more than correcting their language.

    Although I always advise an adult learner does not need to attend classes or courses to learn a language with the correct motivation and self-organisation, that demand can be a bit tougher on 16 year olds. You have the likes of Tim Doner, the polyglot, to show what personal enthusiasm can achieve. See his YouTube Arabic videos.

    If she joined a local class a good teacher will have fun material to help her learn.

    I'm sorry I couldn't be more helpful.

    On the other hand if she has a personal enthusiasm she can go through the past papers and answers (all online) and practice via hinative.com. Just a thought.
 
 
 
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