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Will it make a difference to declare Anxiety on my uni application? Watch

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    So I'm not formally diagnosed with Anxiety, but I was wondering if it would be worth getting a formal diagnosis so I can put that on my application, if it would make any difference? I'm 100% certain I suffer with a moderate-severe degree of anxiety, but I would assume I'd need a formal diagnosis if I were to declare it?
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    No one is ever going to read through your uni application properly anymore. It's not like back in the day where that stuff actually mattered. the government lifted the law that restricted university's on how much students they could take, so now they are just trying to stuff their lecture halls with as much money* they can.


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    (Original post by Nicoley-oley)
    So I'm not formally diagnosed with Anxiety, but I was wondering if it would be worth getting a formal diagnosis so I can put that on my application, if it would make any difference? I'm 100% certain I suffer with a moderate-severe degree of anxiety, but I would assume I'd need a formal diagnosis if I were to declare it?
    you'd need a diagnosis to declare it but it will only make a difference if you want it to, it wont make a difference to the acceptance of your application, they just give you option to declare it so you can get the ball rolling with any support from your chosen university.
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    Hello!

    Some universities offer a "disrupted studies" form or something similar, which gives candidates the opportunity to let the university know about any problems they might be suffering from. For this, however, medical evidence is required.

    I'm not entirely sure how it works on UCAS, if there is a separate section or something on the application- but if you feel like they should know, and you think it could potentially affect your A level grades or time at Uni, I would let them know.

    I wouldn't write it down unless there is evidence to back it up (eg medical note / signature from doctor) - my friend is applying for extenuating circumstances and he's had to get a lot of evidence to back it up. Even then, some universities will not take it into consideration when making an offer / rejecting.

    Hope this helps in some way, I'm only speaking from experience though so it's only an opinion, it is entirely your choice though. Speak to college / school and see
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    you'd need a diagnosis to declare it but it will only make a difference if you want it to, it wont make a difference to the acceptance of your application, they just give you option to declare it so you can get the ball rolling with any support from your chosen university.
    Okay, my main issue is that if I end up going to a university that's far from home and I end up having difficulties coping, I mean, I'm not sure what they could do for me, but I guess knowing there is some kind of support could give me some peace of mind?
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    (Original post by Morganblue68)
    Hello!

    Some universities offer a "disrupted studies" form or something similar, which gives candidates the opportunity to let the university know about any problems they might be suffering from. For this, however, medical evidence is required.

    I'm not entirely sure how it works on UCAS, if there is a separate section or something on the application- but if you feel like they should know, and you think it could potentially affect your A level grades or time at Uni, I would let them know.

    I wouldn't write it down unless there is evidence to back it up (eg medical note / signature from doctor) - my friend is applying for extenuating circumstances and he's had to get a lot of evidence to back it up. Even then, some universities will not take it into consideration when making an offer / rejecting.

    Hope this helps in some way, I'm only speaking from experience though so it's only an opinion, it is entirely your choice though. Speak to college / school and see
    I've found that it did mildly affect my Access course due to difficulty with giving presentations and being assessed with lab experiments, which I suppose could happen again at uni, so I'm thinking I might get a formal diagnosis then... not that I want any excuses for poor performance or anything, I just think the support and understanding could go a long way for me. Thank you
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    (Original post by Nicoley-oley)
    Okay, my main issue is that if I end up going to a university that's far from home and I end up having difficulties coping, I mean, I'm not sure what they could do for me, but I guess knowing there is some kind of support could give me some peace of mind?
    They'd have support like counselling available and you might be able to get a mental health mentor.
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    (Original post by Nicoley-oley)
    I've found that it did mildly affect my Access course due to difficulty with giving presentations and being assessed with lab experiments, which I suppose could happen again at uni, so I'm thinking I might get a formal diagnosis then... not that I want any excuses for poor performance or anything, I just think the support and understanding could go a long way for me. Thank you
    Some of the uni's I looked at have amazing support, but I think a diagnosis would be needed if you wanted to declare it. I doubt it would make a difference to them accepting / rejecting you, but if you end up going there it might be useful for them to know.

    Mo
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    They'd have support like counselling available and you might be able to get a mental health mentor.
    That could help, like I said before, I think just knowing there is some form of support really could put my mind at ease
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    (Original post by Morganblue68)
    Some of the uni's I looked at have amazing support, but I think a diagnosis would be needed if you wanted to declare it. I doubt it would make a difference to them accepting / rejecting you, but if you end up going there it might be useful for them to know.

    Mo
    Okay, thank you for the advice!
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    (Original post by Nicoley-oley)
    So I'm not formally diagnosed with Anxiety, but I was wondering if it would be worth getting a formal diagnosis so I can put that on my application, if it would make any difference? I'm 100% certain I suffer with a moderate-severe degree of anxiety, but I would assume I'd need a formal diagnosis if I were to declare it?
    I am in almost the same situation here.

    You would have to be formally diagnosed and present medical evidence for anxiety. It would count as extenuating circumstances and might get you a lower offer.

    However, think about how this will affect your future after university and if it would be worth it just for a AAB offer instead of AAA, for example. I also have mild anxiety which is only triggered in very specific and extreme circumstances, but chose not to get diagnosed in case it will limit my chances to get a good job in the future. My dream job requires one to have good mental health, which is standard me unless my anxiety is triggered, which rarely if ever happens, so not getting diagnosed seems to be the best course of action in my case. I do not know if your case is different or the same; you will have to think about it and decide whether it is worth it to get diagnosed or not. On the bright side, getting diagnosed could get you help in dealing with your anxiety and may limit it.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Michiyo)
    I am in almost the same situation here.

    You would have to be formally diagnosed and present medical evidence for anxiety. It would count as extenuating circumstances and might get you a lower offer.

    However, think about how this will affect your future after university and if it would be worth it just for a AAB offer instead of AAA, for example. I also have mild anxiety which is only triggered in very specific and extreme circumstances, but chose not to get diagnosed in case it will limit my chances to get a good job in the future. My dream job requires one to have good mental health, which is standard me unless my anxiety is triggered, which rarely if ever happens, so not getting diagnosed seems to be the best course of action in my case. I do not know if your case is different or the same; you will have to think about it and decide whether it is worth it to get diagnosed or not.

    Good luck!
    I mean I already have my grades and some of them slipped due to avoiding presentations and making silly mistakes in practical assessments due to extreme nerves, so instead of the ABB I was predicted, I only achieved a BBC which luckily is the minimum for some unis for my course... but others may not be so lenient... I don't want a free pass, I just want the support. I'll probably get a formal diagnosis asap, even if it means having to declare it later on down the line (since the ucas deadline is so soon)

    Thank you for the advice!
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    (Original post by Nicoley-oley)
    So I'm not formally diagnosed with Anxiety...
    ...then nobody will care. Unless you have EC it won't matter what you say.
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    ...then nobody will care. Unless you have EC it won't matter what you say.
    That was my question, whether or not I should get diagnosed and if it would have made a difference to declare it...
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    (Original post by Lemon Haze)
    , so now they are just trying to stuff their lecture halls with as much money* they can.
    Rubbish.

    Source? Evidence?
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    (Original post by Nicoley-oley)
    So I'm not formally diagnosed with Anxiety, but I was wondering if it would be worth getting a formal diagnosis so I can put that on my application, if it would make any difference? I'm 100% certain I suffer with a moderate-severe degree of anxiety, but I would assume I'd need a formal diagnosis if I were to declare it?
    What unis have you applied to if you dont mind me asking?


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    (Original post by sarah1001)
    What unis have you applied to if you dont mind me asking?


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    If you have anxiety a uni will support you. Uni counselling services are excellent in my experience.

    I'm not sure that a diagnosis is necessary because in my experience some of the best support for mental health exists outside of the nhs.
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    It won't really affect getting a place at uni but it may be worth getting a diagnosis so that you can easily access the universities support services. These vary but they will usually offer you an assessment to check out what you may need from them (if you're undiagnosed the likelihood is you won't need a lot) and then they will be a point of contact for you in case you suddenly find yourself missing deadlines etc. Most unis also have a free counselling service which generally doesn't have a huge waiting period so that may also help you.
 
 
 
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