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    Hi everyone! I have only just received my autism diagnosis (high functioning/aspergers) and I was wondering what happens next? What happens when I tell my university I have autism? Everything is a little bit confusing at the moment haha!
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    You can now apply for disabled students allowance. (DSA) This is usually equipment or non medical help (a mentor or note taker) given to disabled students. It'll only pay for extra costs you have as a disabled student and not generally study costs or general disability costs. You may also get exam arrangements. (such as a smaller room / extra time / rest breaks) if you need them.

    If you talk to the disabled students service, you can give their permission to talk to your lecturers if you want them to do that.
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    (Original post by hannahbanana198)
    Hi everyone! I have only just received my autism diagnosis (high functioning/aspergers) and I was wondering what happens next? What happens when I tell my university I have autism? Everything is a little bit confusing at the moment haha!
    Hey, I was diagnosed in 2015. Im not sure what to put because it has been a bit of a journey for me.

    All I can offer is to try to be aware of how things go when you tell professional contacts about your condition, they shouldnt adjust their decisions based on your disability, but some still do (as I am currently having some trouble of my own.)

    I will say, be careful when you tell "non-professional" contacts (as in friends, family members or new people you meet) as it can sometimes affect how they treat you. This is to be expected in all walks of life, but if you have just been diagnosed, it may affect you (depending on how you feel at the moment! I was in shock for a couple of months after being diagnosed, so some ways people treated me were kind of difficult to deal with at first.)

    It is for sure, a journey. Try to remember that you are not different because of this diagnosis, you have always been this way it is tempting to see your past through "autism coloured glasses" and think about how things could have been different. Try to not get lost in those thoughts :-)

    Erm, if theres anything else specific you would like to know, let me know, ill be happy to try to not ramble my views! haha

    (oh, and Uni's shouldnt care really. The law has made provisions that make discrimination against this condition unfair and against the law in some cases.)
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    (Original post by SonoLuma)
    Hey, I was diagnosed in 2015. Im not sure what to put because it has been a bit of a journey for me.

    All I can offer is to try to be aware of how things go when you tell professional contacts about your condition, they shouldnt adjust their decisions based on your disability, but some still do (as I am currently having some trouble of my own.)

    I will say, be careful when you tell "non-professional" contacts (as in friends, family members or new people you meet) as it can sometimes affect how they treat you. This is to be expected in all walks of life, but if you have just been diagnosed, it may affect you (depending on how you feel at the moment! I was in shock for a couple of months after being diagnosed, so some ways people treated me were kind of difficult to deal with at first.)

    It is for sure, a journey. Try to remember that you are not different because of this diagnosis, you have always been this way it is tempting to see your past through "autism coloured glasses" and think about how things could have been different. Try to not get lost in those thoughts :-)

    Erm, if theres anything else specific you would like to know, let me know, ill be happy to try to not ramble my views! haha

    (oh, and Uni's shouldnt care really. The law has made provisions that make discrimination against this condition unfair and against the law in some cases.)
    I agree with this. I've recently been diagnosed with ADHD and Asperger's at my University whilst studying there, which has allowed me to apply for DSA (originally a dyslexia screening - quite the opposite). Just like what SonoLuma said, you are no different than anyone else as you've just had your diagnosis and have always been the way you are. I'm still undecided whether to tell my parents (since I live with them). The Uni have said they can tell them for me with my permission (which is tempting) but just like the post that I'm replying to says - you can be treated differently.

    Anyway, I would definitely tell your University's learning support team about your diagnosis and speak to an advisor. They will work with you to set up a learning support agreement and can help you fill out forms for Disabled Students Allowance (very beneficial).

    Hope this post helps... sort of.
 
 
 
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