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    no idea, sometimes it makes me sad not knowing
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    It's strange cause I feel entirely the same way about existenialism with the 'give it your own meaning' approach; I think it's incredibly cliché But I don't feel that 'rebellion' should be the main thing taken away from absurdism, moreso the notion that you always have the final say over your emotions (the "there is no fate that cannot be surmounted by scorn" reference). Though this notion itself isn't exactly new; the stoics said it several centuries ago lmao.

    I think an absurdist would struggle with constructing a reason to live because of the absurdity and unpredictableness of life. Since every 'meaning' could be so easily destroyed (like the rock falling right back down the hill after Sisyphus) it becomes a futile endeavour that only leads to misery.
    Lol that reminds me of a quote that said western philosophy is a series of footnotes to the greeks :laugh: (paraphrasing here ofc)
    I guess the way to get around that would be to not attach too much emotional significance to any meaning (I say this i have no idea how i could apply it irl). I mean, you could take a hedonistic attitude to life whilst remembering the absurd (?)

    Also - we're all like sisyphus, except that our constructed meaning doesn't necessarily have to be destroyed. the whole point of the meaning/purpose is that when it is satisfied we get joy out of it, no matter how pointless it is in the grand scheme of things.
    Another way of looking at it: Human nature is extremely absurd and I think part of accepting the absurdity is to accept that we can't help but make meanings, work towards them and (sometimes) see our work unravel. The absurd concept helps us cope with that inevitable rolling of the stone.

    p.s. I just realised the first two paragraph contradict each other, because the more emotion you assign to a meaning the more joy you can get when you satisfy it..
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    (Original post by toonervoustotalk)
    Haha
    How do you have the funds to eat soo much
    I can only afford like a takeaway a week
    hehehe i have a p-t job- spend most of the on takeaways- and a student loan :mmm:
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    (Original post by tamil fever)
    ...like what is the point?
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    and no-one writes to go on TSR

    To please Appa and Amma
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    Life is what you make of it. It can be anything you want...
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    (Original post by CleverSquirrel)
    hehehe i have a p-t job- spend most of the on takeaways- and a student loan :mmm:
    Ahh now it makes sense :lol:
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    (Original post by LeTamoul)
    To please Appa and Amma
    nah i don't think so..lol
    u tamil?
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    (Original post by tamil fever)
    nah i don't think so..lol
    u tamil?
    Yes I am
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    Welcome to nihilism
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    (Original post by tamil fever)
    ...like what is the point?



    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    Life, knowledge and love
    the point of life is life? :holmes:

    (Original post by BigYoSpeck)
    Nobody exists on purpose, nobody belongs anywhere, everybody's gonna die. Come watch TV.
    What to watch on TV though is the question :bandit: or is there no point in choosing the channel either? :dontknow:

    (Original post by prazzyjazzy)
    Making something from nothing? IDK this question is too deep for TSR m8
    No question is too deep for tsr m8, some of the brightest students and avid procrastinators are on here.

    (Original post by tamil fever)
    But don't you ever feel like your wasting ur life and have you ever had those moments when u think to urself:
    "What the hell am I supposed to do?What is the point?"
    Pretty much everyday tbh, for me its dance though, thats my point

    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Don't think about stuff that's not worth thinking about
    But surely

    1) this is worth thinking about, its one of the most worthiest stuffs if you think about it
    2) how would great inventions ever occur if we just get by with what we have/do? :holmes:

    (Original post by Unistudent77)
    To make yourself and other people happy.

    There is no 'meaning' of life. We just exist and we'll die. May aswell enjoy the ride
    Apart from those who believe in reincarnation I guess :holmes:
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    (Original post by ForestShadow)



    Apart from those who believe in reincarnation I guess :holmes:
    Nice quote

    Well i don't believe in reincarnation. Even less believable than that of an afterlife.

    Just live this life to the fullest
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    (Original post by ForestShadow)

    the point of life is life? :holmes:
    Of course, one of the points of life is to keep on living. Probably one of the most frequently evidenced 'points of life' too - evolution is, after all, geared towards survival value.
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    (Original post by lemonlikelime)
    Lol that reminds me of a quote that said western philosophy is a series of footnotes to the greeks :laugh: (paraphrasing here ofc)
    I guess the way to get around that would be to not attach too much emotional significance to any meaning (I say this i have no idea how i could apply it irl). I mean, you could take a hedonistic attitude to life whilst remembering the absurd (?)

    Also - we're all like sisyphus, except that our constructed meaning doesn't necessarily have to be destroyed. the whole point of the meaning/purpose is that when it is satisfied we get joy out of it, no matter how pointless it is in the grand scheme of things.
    Another way of looking at it: Human nature is extremely absurd and I think part of accepting the absurdity is to accept that we can't help but make meanings, work towards them and (sometimes) see our work unravel. The absurd concept helps us cope with that inevitable rolling of the stone.

    p.s. I just realised the first two paragraph contradict each other, because the more emotion you assign to a meaning the more joy you can get when you satisfy it..
    Apologies this is a late response, I told myself I'd reply later then completely forgot

    And that quote seems about right, whenever you try and look at any school of philosophy it's always starting off with "and aristotle/plato/socrates etc. said X about this" lmao.

    I do feel that if you don't attach emotional significance though, then it almost isn't really meaning? Meaning is quite a personal thing and if you take the emotion away it's not really anything. And I don't know if you could class hedonism as meaning really, since it's just pursuing pleasure for pleasure's sake and I actually expect the average absurdist would indeed lead this kind of lifestyle anyway

    I do agree with your general sentiment that you keep expressing of trying to accept the absurd but also allow meaning in life, and for someone who is able to fixate meaning on something, achieve that thing and move onto the next thing, then that is a very useful way to approach and enjoy life. But it requires you to have your meaning attached to something actually achievable; if you don't achieve that goal, or more importantly if your meaning is based on something like being in a relationship with X person, then that's where it all starts to fall down.

    Also your viewpoint seems to actually still be relatively close to absurdism, since you're emphasising our work towards meaning and watching it unwravel, which is quite similar to the quote "the destination is always more important than the journey" which I feel lies closer towards what an absurdist would believe than existentialist.

    You said this a few posts ago as well, but I too am by no means an expert in existenialist philosophy so this is my interpretation
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    No matter how zealous this may sound, it's whatever you want it to be. Personally it's to do the things that make me happy.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Apologies this is a late response, I told myself I'd reply later then completely forgot

    And that quote seems about right, whenever you try and look at any school of philosophy it's always starting off with "and aristotle/plato/socrates etc. said X about this" lmao.

    (1) I do feel that if you don't attach emotional significance though, then it almost isn't really meaning? Meaning is quite a personal thing and if you take the emotion away it's not really anything. And I don't know if you could class hedonism as meaning really, since it's just pursuing pleasure for pleasure's sake and I actually expect the average absurdist would indeed lead this kind of lifestyle anyway

    (2) I do agree with your general sentiment that you keep expressing of trying to accept the absurd but also allow meaning in life, and for someone who is able to fixate meaning on something, achieve that thing and move onto the next thing, then that is a very useful way to approach and enjoy life. But it requires you to have your meaning attached to something actually achievable; if you don't achieve that goal, or more importantly if your meaning is based on something like being in a relationship with X person, then that's where it all starts to fall down.

    (3) Also your viewpoint seems to actually still be relatively close to absurdism, since you're emphasising our work towards meaning and watching it unwravel, which is quite similar to the quote "the destination is always more important than the journey" which I feel lies closer towards what an absurdist would believe than existentialist.

    You said this a few posts ago as well, but I too am by no means an expert in existenialist philosophy so this is my interpretation
    No worries! Understandable aha I feel like philosophy generally requires me to actively engage my brain to think more than other things on tsr (or otherwise)

    (1) Lol those are good points and I agree.

    (2) Yeah I see what you mean. Urgh this is hard to get round tbh. The only answer I have to that is that you should assign meaning carefully aha, which isn't really an answer at all

    (3) the main reason I'm emphasising the unravelling bit is because I can't believe that any work I do will ultimately amount to anything, I agree with the idea of the absurd too much - which I think was what you were saying originally anyway aha. *sigh* no wonder if takes years and years for philosophers to construct counter arguments for ideas.

    All this aside, I strongly believe that for daily life, constantly second guessing yourself and whether what you're doing is meaningful is counter-productive because, by the nature of the society we live in, we will end up doing/working for things which we personally may not find meaningful. Recently I've gotten into the idea of democritus and his (to generalise hugely) attitude to life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6USqt3HztA&t=21s
    (arguably another version of absurdism)

    I saw you on the hugs thread actually! Are you feeling better ?
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    (Original post by lemonlikelime)
    No worries! Understandable aha I feel like philosophy generally requires me to actively engage my brain to think more than other things on tsr (or otherwise)

    (1) Lol those are good points and I agree.

    (2) Yeah I see what you mean. Urgh this is hard to get round tbh. The only answer I have to that is that you should assign meaning carefully aha, which isn't really an answer at all

    (3) the main reason I'm emphasising the unravelling bit is because I can't believe that any work I do will ultimately amount to anything, I agree with the idea of the absurd too much - which I think was what you were saying originally anyway aha. *sigh* no wonder if takes years and years for philosophers to construct counter arguments for ideas.

    All this aside, I strongly believe that for daily life, constantly second guessing yourself and whether what you're doing is meaningful is counter-productive because, by the nature of the society we live in, we will end up doing/working for things which we personally may not find meaningful. Recently I've gotten into the idea of democritus and his (to generalise hugely) attitude to life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6USqt3HztA&t=21s
    (arguably another version of absurdism)

    I saw you on the hugs thread actually! Are you feeling better ?
    (1) Thank you x)

    (2) Yes it's always rather difficult, because unless you attach meaning to something that you know is going to happen anyway, it always seems very unstable. You always need that emotional connection.

    (3) Forgive me here if I'm misreading, but by saying "I can't believe that any work I do will amount to anything" you actually have just come across as very nihilist, because it's all meaningless I guess the absurd thinks moreso that it only amounts to disappointment (searching for meaning) and that we ought to recognise this and be happy regardless, but the line between nihilism and absurdism is arguably very blurred - absurdism is just more.. positive.

    Yes it's normally better not to focus on the wider meaning of things, but it can come in useful towards living your life in general. For example a nihilist really has nothing to lose and it could be quite liberating to be one, since you don't have to care about anything as you recognise how meaningless it all is. And then the absurdist has the advantage of being able to recognise the inherent absurdity of the world itself and laugh in the face of things that we all take so seriously, yet are genuinely quite strange things to be doing in the long run (the best example I saw was, what if we imagined fish getting up out of the water, putting on a suit and going to work? it seems very strange doesn't it.)

    I watched the video and Democritus seems very stoic and stoicism is a very good lifestyle approach to follow (I don't think it's absurdist because he views the world as inherently grim not meaningless) - it reminds me of the quote "What need is there to weep over parts of life, the whole of it calls for tears." (i.e. all of life is suffering which you should expect, so don't cry over suffering). You should read more into if you haven't: Seneca, Aurelias and Epicureas are the three major players and their books should be available online.

    And I'm fine thank you, I just have tough nights
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      (Original post by tamil fever)
      ...like what is the point?
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      and no-one writes to go on TSR


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      (Original post by Inexorably)
      (1) Thank you x)

      (2) Yes it's always rather difficult, because unless you attach meaning to something that you know is going to happen anyway, it always seems very unstable. You always need that emotional connection.

      (3) Forgive me here if I'm misreading, but by saying "I can't believe that any work I do will amount to anything" you actually have just come across as very nihilist, because it's all meaningless I guess the absurd thinks moreso that it only amounts to disappointment (searching for meaning) and that we ought to recognise this and be happy regardless, but the line between nihilism and absurdism is arguably very blurred - absurdism is just more.. positive.

      Yes it's normally better not to focus on the wider meaning of things, but it can come in useful towards living your life in general. For example a nihilist really has nothing to lose and it could be quite liberating to be one, since you don't have to care about anything as you recognise how meaningless it all is. And then the absurdist has the advantage of being able to recognise the inherent absurdity of the world itself and laugh in the face of things that we all take so seriously, yet are genuinely quite strange things to be doing in the long run (the best example I saw was, what if we imagined fish getting up out of the water, putting on a suit and going to work? it seems very strange doesn't it.)

      I watched the video and Democritus seems very stoic and stoicism is a very good lifestyle approach to follow (I don't think it's absurdist because he views the world as inherently grim not meaningless) - it reminds me of the quote "What need is there to weep over parts of life, the whole of it calls for tears." (i.e. all of life is suffering which you should expect, so don't cry over suffering). You should read more into if you haven't: Seneca, Aurelias and Epicureas are the three major players and their books should be available online.

      And I'm fine thank you, I just have tough nights
      Hahaha no you're right, I should have specified that when I say "amount to anything" I mean in the grand scheme of things, me doing well in life makes very little difference to the universe or the majority of even humans around me - therefore to try to assign my actions a higher purpose seems silly :-P but it does make a difference to me. And I'd agree with you when you say the line is blurred - I feel like they both make the same point but diverge at the resolution.

      Sorry if I keep repeating the same points in a different way but -
      I feel like there is a difference between nihilism and absurdism. nihilism (at least, the impression I have of it) strikes me as a resignation to the pointlessness of life; with absurdism, it feels less like a resignation and more like a "noble coping mechanism", because we search for intrinsic meaning naturally and you can't just reject that desire without a lot of difficulty (which I feel is what nihilism does).

      The bit in italics is probably one of the best bit of the impact absurdism can have in our life!
      Yes I see what you mean (about democritus), but for some reason I thought that because baseline sadness in the world gives little things more value, the same can be applied to "meaninglessness". :confused:
      Thank you for suggestions! Shall look into them (LOVE EPICURUS BTW) :-)
      Lol I love how you felt the need to simplify the quote for me - (the quote itself is really good!)
      Sorry to hear that :-( you can always talk about it if you'd like :-)
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      (Original post by lemonlikelime)
      Hahaha no you're right, I should have specified that when I say "amount to anything" I mean in the grand scheme of things, me doing well in life makes very little difference to the universe or the majority of even humans around me - therefore to try to assign my actions a higher purpose seems silly :-P but it does make a difference to me. And I'd agree with you when you say the line is blurred - I feel like they both make the same point but diverge at the resolution.

      Sorry if I keep repeating the same points in a different way but -
      I feel like there is a difference between nihilism and absurdism. nihilism (at least, the impression I have of it) strikes me as a resignation to the pointlessness of life; with absurdism, it feels less like a resignation and more like a "noble coping mechanism", because we search for intrinsic meaning naturally and you can't just reject that desire without a lot of difficulty (which I feel is what nihilism does).

      The bit in italics is probably one of the best bit of the impact absurdism can have in our life!
      Yes I see what you mean (about democritus), but for some reason I thought that because baseline sadness in the world gives little things more value, the same can be applied to "meaninglessness". :confused:
      Thank you for suggestions! Shall look into them (LOVE EPICURUS BTW) :-)
      Lol I love how you felt the need to simplify the quote for me - (the quote itself is really good!)
      Sorry to hear that :-( you can always talk about it if you'd like :-)
      If anyyhing I say does not make sense, please forgive as I am not 100% sound of mind

      I see, I did quesiton what you were typing and had to read it three times before I concluded what you might have meant (which was wrong!). Yes, existentialism does largely make a difference to the individual and that's where I think its merits actually lie - that meaning can still be of importance to individuals and we can't just immediately dismiss it. But then I jsut go back to all of my former problems about having meaning

      I do agree with your differene beween the two actually Tho perhaps, by actually trying to come to grips with the 'absurd', absurdists almost unintentonally give their life the meaning of "to live in the face of absurdity". But a coping mechanism is a better way of viewing it.

      Hahaha i didnt simplify the quote cause i thought you were dumb, it's cause I never understood the quote myself at first until put into wider context (Seneca said it to his family as they cried whilst he was being dragged off to his death!)

      And yeah the democritus could be applied to meaningless also

      It's fine I prefer not to talk about my problems
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      (Original post by Inexorably)
      If anyyhing I say does not make sense, please forgive as I am not 100% sound of mind

      I see, I did quesiton what you were typing and had to read it three times before I concluded what you might have meant (which was wrong!). Yes, existentialism does largely make a difference to the individual and that's where I think its merits actually lie - that meaning can still be of importance to individuals and we can't just immediately dismiss it. But then I jsut go back to all of my former problems about having meaning

      I do agree with your differene beween the two actually Tho perhaps, by actually trying to come to grips with the 'absurd', absurdists almost unintentonally give their life the meaning of "to live in the face of absurdity". But a coping mechanism is a better way of viewing it.

      Hahaha i didnt simplify the quote cause i thought you were dumb, it's cause I never understood the quote myself at first until put into wider context (Seneca said it to his family as they cried whilst he was being dragged off to his death!)

      And yeah the democritus could be applied to meaningless also

      It's fine I prefer not to talk about my problems
      Lol I'm sorry I looked back at what I had written and I didn't quite understand it either
      That's true. I hope I don't sound rude when I say this (I don't know how this will come across), but I think there's a point at which philosophy can only do so much, and after that you have to find "inner peace" by yourself (cliche as that sounds - I'm still struggling with that and I think most people do in one way or another). After all, just having a "love for wisdom" doesn't make us wise. (i know that sounds more like some modern hippie stuff.. but it does have some element of truth to it )
      It's like that thread that someone posted some time ago about agreeing with the idea that heaven/hell doesn't exist but not being happy with it.

      I did a mini stalk of your profile (no creep intended) and saw you did philosophy a level! Lol no wonder you know your stuff - my knowledge comes from youtube and sparknotes so I apologise if some of what I say sounds a bit naive or "unphilosophical"

      Lol trust a stoic to make a wise observation on life as his own was being ended - but I do get it, the context+situation gives more depth to/understanding of the quote. The greeks are so interesting aha.

      Okay if you're sure :-) Maybe you could type/write up everything that's going wrong to get it off your chest and just delete the document. I do that sometimes - it works for some.
     
     
     
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